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Posts tagged: street photography

Arlene Gottfried Captured New York at Its Best

Angel and Woman on Boardwalk in Brighton Beach, New York, 1976

Women on Riis Beach, New York, 1980

Arlene Gottfried (1950–2017) was a paradox of the best kind: the infinitely shy artist who can blow the roof off the joint while singing gospel, or approach any person in order to take their photo. Hailing from Brooklyn, Gottfried spent her childhood in Coney Island where all kinds of characters loomed near and far.

She took up photography, casually snapping some of the greatest New York scenes ever caught on film, documenting an era of life that once defined the city, but has long since been erased. In Sometimes Overwhelming (powerHouse Books). Gottfried chronicles the charismatic figures she encountered on the streets and the beaches, the nightclubs and the parks, the boardwalks and the parades, the circus and the dog shows.

These Nostalgic Photos Capture the Spirit of NYC

Sleuth

Chrysler

When describing the American photographer Berenice Abbott, the French poet Jean Cocteau once said, “She is a chess game between light and shadow.” It’s been almost ninety years since Abbott made New York her stomping ground, but her ghost continues to haunt its streets. And perhaps if you look hard enough, you’ll see she left a few of those chess pieces behind.

Ian Robert Wallace knows how to find them. As the child of two architects, the young photographer and filmmaker always shared a bond with the city. “I knew when I was growing up that I wanted to live in NY at some point,” he admits. “I thought it was mesmerizing.” He finally made the move when he went to NYU in 2012, but in some ways, the much-anticipated arrival took him back in time.

12 Must-See Exhibitions at the Indian Photography Festival

Delhi, India © Alejandra Cardenas, from The Print Swap by Feature Shoot

The Indian Photography Festival (IPF) by the Light Craft Foundation is now underway! As South Asia’s leading photography festival, IPF 2018 includes stunning exhibitions, talks, workshops, and portfolio reviews with some of the world’s most influential and pioneering artists, journalists, and editors. Among those present are the photojournalists Nick Ut (Vietnam) and Anush Babajanyan (Armenia), National Geographic‘s senior photo editor James Wellford, the photographer Sandro Miller, the photographer/filmmaker Pep Bonet, and many more.

Featuring 550 photographers hailing from 52 countries, this year’s events speak to the power of photography to inspire social change. Exhibiting organizations range from Women Photograph to the Siena International Photo Award and everyone in between. The festival opened last night at the State Gallery of Art in Hyderabad, India, and it will run through October 7th. In anticipation of opening weekend, we put together this preview of just twelve of this year’s extraordinay exhibitions to whet your appetite. Be sure to head on over the IPF website to see the whole schedule. And if you’re in or near Hyderabad this month, don’t miss the chance to see all the shows in person!

A Photographic Duet Inspired by the Glittering “Violet Isle” of the Caribbean

© Rebecca Norris Webb

© Alex Webb

For more than a century, Cuba has mesmerized the world, beckoning visitors to its vibrant shores and the rich fertile soil that has earned the island the little-known name of the “Violet Isle.” It is a land of captivating beauty, majestic wonder, and alluring mystique, one whose magic and mysteries are slowly revealed through the work of artists, filmmakers, and musicians.

Over a period of 15 years, American photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb made 11 trips to Cuba, each drawn to difference elements of this multi-faceted gem. Alex Webb explored the country’s street life, capturing scenes of everyday life set in a prism of vivid colors that glow under the Caribbean sun, while Rebecca Norris Webb was drawn to the resounding presence of animal life, photographing tiny zoos, pigeon societies, and personal menageries.

The result is Violet Isle (Radius Books), their first collaboration. First published in 2009, the book is a photographic duet that pairs two distinct but complementary visions of Cuba at the turn of the millennium. The book, long unavailable, has just been re-released. We speak with the authors here about their fresh take on a much-photographed land, giving us new perspectives of life on the Violet Isle.

A Look Back at Saul Leiter’s Pioneering Color Work

Harlem 1960

Red Umbrella 1951

Color is the provenance of the painter, who must select the palette before setting brush to canvas. Color is sensation that shapes mood, as the light waves in color stimulate different emotional centers in the brain. Color is an affect that evokes a response, most alluringly an innate attraction and insatiable curiosity, an ability to be still, even spellbound, held in a gaze, enraptured by the sheer pleasure of hue and shade.

American photographer Saul Leiter was a master of color, a debt owed in great part to his training as a painter. Born in Pittsburgh in 1923 to Wolf Leiter, the internationally renowned Talmudic scholar, young Saul was intended for the Rabbinate – until his father opposed it. In 1946, he left Cleveland Theological College in 1946 and moved to New York to work as an artist.

One Photographer’s Love Letter to Appalachia

Erik, Athens

Hubie Bobo Lane, Chauncey

The Ohio photographer Rich-Joseph Facun remembers the exact day he started work on Black Diamonds: January 5th, 2018. He saw a stranger while leaving his doctor’s office, and he stopped briefly to greet him. “As we talked a little more, I began to get annoyed with myself,” the photographer remembers. “I knew I should photograph him.” After some consideration, he did, and he’s been sharing stories from the towns of Appalachian Ohio ever since.

A Joyful, Fearless Exhibition About Women Photographing Women

Isabel Bateman in the Character of Queen Henrietta Maria, 1874 © Julia Margaret Cameron

Self-Portrait, Canal Saint Martin, Paris, 1930’s © Ilse Bing

American Girl in Italy, 1951 © Ruth Orkin

In 1865, The Photographic Journal published a review of the work of Julia Margaret Cameron. It ended with the line, “We are sorry to have to speak thus severely on the works of a lady, but we feel compelled to do so in the interest of the art.” On more than one occasion, she was dismissed, belittled, and even mocked, and in some cases, critics made special reference to her gender.

Now, a century and a half later, we recognize Cameron as a pioneer who left an indelible mark on the history of photography. “In many ways, Julia Margaret Cameron was a feminist even if there wasn’t a word for it,” Daniel Cooney, the gallerist behind Daniel Cooney Fine Art, tells me. “She was one of the first female practitioners of photography, and she was making images that revealed women as complex, intelligent people, even though they had very few rights.”

Beginning with that brilliant Victorian lady and extending through the Second, Third, and Fourth Wave, Cooney’s exhibition Into the Light honors generations of women behind–and in front of–the camera.

A 97-Year-Old Photographer and Her Love Affair with New York

Harlem

Antoinette, Chelsea

“Her photographs are etched into her mind,” the curator Daniel Cooney says of Vivian Cherry, the artist behind the current show at his gallery, titled Helluva Town. Pick out any one of her pictures, and chances are, she’ll be able to tell you the story from memory. Cherry entered the New York photography scene in the 1940s as a darkroom technician when she was a dancer in her early twenties, and she would continue to document her city and its streets for more than seventy years. She lives in Manhattan today.

The Print Swap Comes to Berlin in a New Photo Exhibition

The Crying Window © Anne Closuit Eisenhart (@lesfifoles), Brooklyn, NY

Steam Streets © Erica Reade (@ericareadeimages), Brooklyn, NY

Alexa Becker, the Acquisitions Editor for photography and art books at the influential publisher Kehrer Verlag, has selected 30 images from The Print Swap collection to be part of our upcoming exhibition at BERLIN BLUE art. This will be the fifth-ever Print Swap show and the first in Europe. All photographers who participate in The Print Swap give and receive a print; the project connects photographers across genres and thousands of miles. A different guest curator and industry leader chooses approximately 25-40 images for each of our exhibitions. We invite all photographers to submit here.

The Berlin Print Swap exhibition includes photographers from throughout the United States, England, Italy, Greece, Portugal, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Norway, Austria, Russia, and Australia. Through Becker’s selections, we travel from megacities to the vast wilderness and back again; in the spirit of the swap, we find unlikely visual cues tying together dissimilar places. When seen from above, Navid Baraty’s geometric New York City echoes Shannon Kerr’s feral Grand Canyon; Damien Drew looks out a window in Japan to see a concrete maze, while Marc Schindl peers into his rearview mirror to discover an endless landscape, set on fire by the light of the sun. Anne Closuit Eisenhart and John Duke Kisch capture worlds abstracted by rain and condensation, while Nelson Miranda and Alberto Blanco photograph underpasses more than 10,000 kilometers apart.

Please note that we are currently accepting submissions for our next exhibition, taking place early this fall in Hyderabad, India, as part of The Indian Photography Festival (IPF) by the Light Craft Foundation. The world-renowned photojournalist Ami Vitale will curate the show. Submit to The Print Swap here. As always, it costs $40/image to be included. We cover printing and shipping. All photographers who submit will participate in the worldwide exchange, and Vitale will select a total of 25 images to include in this next exhibition. Submit today!

South Beach, 1974-1990: Photographs of a Jewish Community

Gay Block

Gay Block

Gay Block

Long before South Beach in Miami became a destination among the jet set, it was a thriving retirement community for Jewish Americans, who made their fortunes up north before cashing their chips in and heading to Florida to spend their final years in the sun.

During the 1960s, 70s, and 80s, when they came en masse, they decamped in the Art Deco wonder palaces that had been the perfect getaway for the likes of Frank Sinatra and Marilyn Monroe. Once they arrived, they brought their culture with them, a singular mixture of Yiddish Americana that exalts the gestalt of mid-twentieth century “Lawn Guyland.”

In celebration, HistoryMiami Museum presented South Beach, 1974-1990: Photographs of a Jewish Community, a group exhibition featuring more than 120 works by Gay Block, Gary Monroe, Richard Nagler, David Scheinbaum, and Andy Sweet.

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