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Posts tagged: street photography

Ethereal Photos from the Shores of the Dead Sea

For years, the Israeli-based photographer Alexander Bronfer returned to Ein Bokek beach regularly, searching for moments of poetry and silence long after most people had left. “Over generations, people have entered into state of tranquility visiting those ancient shores,” he says. “It’s difficult find the right words to describe it. This is the mystery of the Dead Sea.” He titles this body of work Sodom, after the nearby mountain and the rumored site of the biblical city by the same name.

A Kaleidoscopic Portrait of America in 1966

‘Schoolboy, New York, 1966′

‘South Pacific Restaurant, Chicago, 1966’

‘Trade Union Workers, Detroit. 1966’

Born and raised in Tuscany, Mario Carnicelli was 29 when he entered and won a national Italian photography contest sponsored by Popular Photography magazine, Ferrania Film, Mamiya, and Pentax. The prize was a one month trip across United States, with destinations including New York, Washington, D.C., Detroit, Chicago, and San Francisco.

Carnicelli returned to Italy and staged an exhibition at the Pirelli Tower in Milan under the title I’m sorry, America! Evocative indeed. Carncelli felt indiscreet, as though he was intruding upon the affairs of a nation that would soon be burning. He saw past appearances, peering into the soul, recognizing over 50 years ago a profound loneliness, a sense of alienation that only today people are beginning to address, as it reaches epidemic proportions.

Yet within this state, there is a poetry, a longing that underscores each and every scene. It is a wish and a desire, one that persists within every frame that Carnicelli shoots. It is almost a hello and a goodbye, a passing through, and if not for these photographs, no one else would see it too. It is the hope and the belief that a photograph can bridge both time and space.

Exploring the Chimerical World of Fantasy in “Korean Dreams”

Kim Jong-il
Kim Jong-Il was the Supreme Leader of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea between 1994 and 2011. Affectionately referred to as the “Dear Leader”, Kim Jong-Il presided over a highly repressive regime that controlled virtually every aspect of political, social and economic life. Note: The North Korean government website once stated that Kim Jong-Il was the world greatest golfer and never needed to urinate or defecate.

Mass Gathering
The North Korean constitution guarantees the freedoms of speech and assembly but in practice the regime does not tolerate any challenge to its authority or propaganda machine. Gatherings outside state-organised civic events and ceremonies are strictly prohibited in order to prevent the spread of dangerous liberal ideas.

The media will have you believe we live in a post-truth world – but what they fail to mention is, this is the way it has always been. Misinformation, disinformation, deception, deceit – the powerful have always sought to use smoke and mirrors to cover their tracks. In a world ruled by 24/7 communications, we have amplified the divide between illusion and reality, opinion and reportage.

Yet, the systems that distort, erase, and wholly rewrite history exist within all cultures, regardless of wealth and technology. Consider North Korea, a nation that exists as both a fantastical image and a quixotic mystery to the world. The distance between these two realms has captivated Canadian photographer Nathalie Daoust.

In her new exhibition, Korean Dreams at the Gadsden Museum of Art in Gadsden, AL (September 7-October 29, 2018), Daoust has created a series of photographs that act a metaphor for the way information is manipulated in North Korea. During the development stage, Daoust deliberately obscures her photographs. As the layers of film are peeled off, information is “lost,” and what remains is a haunting shadow of the original – it’s truth no longer evident, or even essential to the viewing experience.

24 Photos from The Print Swap Are Headed to London!

Visitors © Sebastian Dijkstra Nilander (@___sebastian_dijkstra___), Lier, Norway

guides & messengers / net fishing in Cartagena © Hakim Kabbaj (@ _______hakim), Brooklyn, NY

Palouse Green Acres © Clark Most (@clarkmost), Midland, MI

The Print Swap by Feature Shoot is coming to The Other Art Fair in London on October 4th, in an exhibition curated by Caroline Hunter, the Picture Editor at The Guardian Weekend Magazine! This show is our first in the UK, featuring 24 images in total with photographers hailing from the United States, Canada, England, Norway, Germany, Poland, Italy, Belgium, and Qatar. The Other Art Fair is expected to draw over 14,000 visitors.

While this show has no fixed theme, Hunter’s selections feel bound by a common thread; that is, they all seek beauty in the overlooked. These artists ask us to discover and delight in the surprises that lie beyond the surface, whether it’s the poetry of color in the streets of London (Kyun Ngui), an otherworldly trick of the light behind a seemingly ordinary tree (Sebastian Dijkstra Nilander), or the shadow cast by a lonely basketball hoop (Bastian Richter).

Remembering the net fishers he encountered in Cartagena, the photographer Hakim Kabbaj writes, “Despite the fact that they were just kids making a few bucks for the day, at that moment, they seemed to become mythological figures who had control over everything around them, the boat, the net, the fish, the birds, the tides and sun.” Amanda Annand says she feels “most at home in small and unusual places, and similarly, Edward Kreutzarek admits, “I always had that affinity for those not ‘obviously beautiful’ places.”

If you’re in London between October 4th and 7th, be sure to check out the show in person! As always, we invite photographers around the world to submit images to The Print Swap by tagging #theprintswap. Our team of editors selects outstanding images to be part of the project, and participating photographers both give and receive prints. Prints are mailed out at random, so it’s always a fun surprise to see who ends up with each print. A photographer in New York, for instance, could receive a print from Pakistan. While it’s free to submit to The Print Swap, selected photographers pay $40/image to participate, and that covers printing and shipping in full.

In November, we’ll be having our holiday party and exhibition at ROOT Studios in Manhattan, and all photographers who participate in The Print Swap between now and November 11th will get to show work! Learn more at our website, and follow along at @theprintswap on Instagram for more.

Arlene Gottfried Captured New York at Its Best

Angel and Woman on Boardwalk in Brighton Beach, New York, 1976

Women on Riis Beach, New York, 1980

Arlene Gottfried (1950–2017) was a paradox of the best kind: the infinitely shy artist who can blow the roof off the joint while singing gospel, or approach any person in order to take their photo. Hailing from Brooklyn, Gottfried spent her childhood in Coney Island where all kinds of characters loomed near and far.

She took up photography, casually snapping some of the greatest New York scenes ever caught on film, documenting an era of life that once defined the city, but has long since been erased. In Sometimes Overwhelming (powerHouse Books). Gottfried chronicles the charismatic figures she encountered on the streets and the beaches, the nightclubs and the parks, the boardwalks and the parades, the circus and the dog shows.

These Nostalgic Photos Capture the Spirit of NYC

Sleuth

Chrysler

When describing the American photographer Berenice Abbott, the French poet Jean Cocteau once said, “She is a chess game between light and shadow.” It’s been almost ninety years since Abbott made New York her stomping ground, but her ghost continues to haunt its streets. And perhaps if you look hard enough, you’ll see she left a few of those chess pieces behind.

Ian Robert Wallace knows how to find them. As the child of two architects, the young photographer and filmmaker always shared a bond with the city. “I knew when I was growing up that I wanted to live in NY at some point,” he admits. “I thought it was mesmerizing.” He finally made the move when he went to NYU in 2012, but in some ways, the much-anticipated arrival took him back in time.

12 Must-See Exhibitions at the Indian Photography Festival

Delhi, India © Alejandra Cardenas, from The Print Swap by Feature Shoot

The Indian Photography Festival (IPF) by the Light Craft Foundation is now underway! As South Asia’s leading photography festival, IPF 2018 includes stunning exhibitions, talks, workshops, and portfolio reviews with some of the world’s most influential and pioneering artists, journalists, and editors. Among those present are the photojournalists Nick Ut (Vietnam) and Anush Babajanyan (Armenia), National Geographic‘s senior photo editor James Wellford, the photographer Sandro Miller, the photographer/filmmaker Pep Bonet, and many more.

Featuring 550 photographers hailing from 52 countries, this year’s events speak to the power of photography to inspire social change. Exhibiting organizations range from Women Photograph to the Siena International Photo Award and everyone in between. The festival opened last night at the State Gallery of Art in Hyderabad, India, and it will run through October 7th. In anticipation of opening weekend, we put together this preview of just twelve of this year’s extraordinay exhibitions to whet your appetite. Be sure to head on over the IPF website to see the whole schedule. And if you’re in or near Hyderabad this month, don’t miss the chance to see all the shows in person!

A Photographic Duet Inspired by the Glittering “Violet Isle” of the Caribbean

© Rebecca Norris Webb

© Alex Webb

For more than a century, Cuba has mesmerized the world, beckoning visitors to its vibrant shores and the rich fertile soil that has earned the island the little-known name of the “Violet Isle.” It is a land of captivating beauty, majestic wonder, and alluring mystique, one whose magic and mysteries are slowly revealed through the work of artists, filmmakers, and musicians.

Over a period of 15 years, American photographers Alex Webb and Rebecca Norris Webb made 11 trips to Cuba, each drawn to difference elements of this multi-faceted gem. Alex Webb explored the country’s street life, capturing scenes of everyday life set in a prism of vivid colors that glow under the Caribbean sun, while Rebecca Norris Webb was drawn to the resounding presence of animal life, photographing tiny zoos, pigeon societies, and personal menageries.

The result is Violet Isle (Radius Books), their first collaboration. First published in 2009, the book is a photographic duet that pairs two distinct but complementary visions of Cuba at the turn of the millennium. The book, long unavailable, has just been re-released. We speak with the authors here about their fresh take on a much-photographed land, giving us new perspectives of life on the Violet Isle.

A Look Back at Saul Leiter’s Pioneering Color Work

Harlem 1960

Red Umbrella 1951

Color is the provenance of the painter, who must select the palette before setting brush to canvas. Color is sensation that shapes mood, as the light waves in color stimulate different emotional centers in the brain. Color is an affect that evokes a response, most alluringly an innate attraction and insatiable curiosity, an ability to be still, even spellbound, held in a gaze, enraptured by the sheer pleasure of hue and shade.

American photographer Saul Leiter was a master of color, a debt owed in great part to his training as a painter. Born in Pittsburgh in 1923 to Wolf Leiter, the internationally renowned Talmudic scholar, young Saul was intended for the Rabbinate – until his father opposed it. In 1946, he left Cleveland Theological College in 1946 and moved to New York to work as an artist.

One Photographer’s Love Letter to Appalachia

Erik, Athens

Hubie Bobo Lane, Chauncey

The Ohio photographer Rich-Joseph Facun remembers the exact day he started work on Black Diamonds: January 5th, 2018. He saw a stranger while leaving his doctor’s office, and he stopped briefly to greet him. “As we talked a little more, I began to get annoyed with myself,” the photographer remembers. “I knew I should photograph him.” After some consideration, he did, and he’s been sharing stories from the towns of Appalachian Ohio ever since.

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