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Lee Deigaard Photographs the Backs of Horses as Landscapes

Lee Deigaard

Lee Deigaard

I had featured the work of New Orleans artist Lee Deigaard a few years ago, and I was so excited when I learned she’d be at the Living With Animals conference at Eastern Kentucky University in March so we could finally meet. I love the photographs in her series Equuleus (“part of a multi-media long-term project, In Your Dreams [Horses], exploring horse personality and individuality, sensory processing and proprioception, concepts of invitation, initiation, and trespass, and shared thresholds of experience between horse and human”) for their playful concept, their surreal, otherworldly quality, and the series’ thoughtful, poetic statement.

65 Photos from The Print Swap Are Coming to Photoville!

‘A Broken Pulsar’ © Fili Olsefski, Athens, Greece

‘Down by the Station’ © Steffen Tuck, Brisbane, Australia

‘Havana by Night’ © Eric Hsu, New York, NY

Last year, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a way to connect photographers around the world. The rules are simple: anyone can submit by using the hashtag #theprintswap on Instagram. If your image is selected, it’s printed by the experts at Skink Ink in Brooklyn before being mailed across the world and landing on the doorstep of another winner. Every winning photographer gives a print, and every winning photographer receives a print too. Pieces are mailed out randomly, so it’s always a fun surprise to see who ends up with which print.

Since its inception, The Print Swap has received more than 45,000 submissions. Curators Alison Zavos and Julia Sabot have selected more than 2,500 winning images. Over the past two months, they’ve also considered all incoming submissions and handpicked 65 of them to show at the first ever Print Swap exhibition, opening in September at Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photoville, the largest annual photography event in New York City and, will include 70+ exhibitions this year, all installed in repurposed shipping containers-turned-galleries.

This is truly an international exhibition. Zavos and Sabot chose pictures from photographers working in twenty countries around the world. But more than that, this collection represents a wide range of practices, genres, and methods. There’s film; there’s digital. There’s classic black and white and vibrant, artificial color.

These photographers find reverence, dignity, and whimsy in humans and animals alike. Jake Green photographs Sonja Usher, an actor playing the role of the Archbishop of Canterbury in a production of Shakespeare’s Henry V. Kristen Bartley introduces us to Picasso, a dog whose name presumably comes from the slightly off-kilter structure of his face. Even uninhabited places, like Steffen Tuck’s Australian subway station or Bonita Chan’s reflected Hong Kong carousel, seem to thrum with life.

For all the beauty, there are also echoes of urgency and loss that color and illuminate corners of this exhibition. Aleksandra Dynas meets children living in the streets of Uganda, where over ten thousand young people go without food, shelter, education and medical care. Many work in demolition and do jobs on trucks, and the littlest ones collect metal and plastic. Yusni Aziz encounters a young resident of the Kampung Akuarium in Jakarta sitting in his “dream house,” a thoughtfully designed and decorated fisherman’s boat, after families in the area were evicted and their homes were razed to the ground.

Here, you’ll find all the participating photographers showing work at The Print Swap exhibition at Photoville. We hope you’ll visit in person between September 13-24, 2017. After all, these prints were meant to be seen in real life, hanging on a wall. As always, The Print Swap is open for submissions. Find more details on our website, and check in at @theprintswap on Instagram, where we regularly share winning images. Thank you to everyone to submitted work this time around. We love seeing your images.

Drugs, Poop, and Harpoon Attacks: One Photographer’s Crazy Life

Rainbow Gathering, Guatemala

When I first wrote about photographer Benoit Paillé last year, it seemed as though he was in a different place every time I emailed him. “I’m always on the move,” he told me. “Okay,” I thought to myself, “I get it. Photographers travel.” Turns out, I hadn’t understood after all. He was being literal. This particular photographer lives on the road. His house is a 21-foot camper van.

Thievery in the Redwood Forests of Humboldt County, California

Semper Virens

Coastal Drive, Southwest View

The redwood trees of Northern Pacific Coast are among the oldest living things on earth, with life spans that average 1,200 to 1,800 years. Also known as Sequoia sepmervirens, they include these evergreens include the tallest trees on the planet, reaching up to 379 feet (115.5 meters) in height and 29.2 feet (8.9 meters) in diameter. Simply put, they are majestic beings that have fallen victim to the greed of wo/man.

The First Peoples of American lived in the forest for thousands of years, able to create a symbiotic relationship with the land without destroying it. Their spiritual beliefs, combined with knowledge of the natural world, allowed them to cultivate the resources of the forest and live in harmony with the earth.

All of this changed with the arrival of an imperialist force that traveled across the Atlantic Ocean and took land that did not belong to them. As the descendants of Europe made this country their own, they ravaged the landscape without thought to the consequences of their actions. They began decimating the forests to build homes, tearing down trees with no effort to replace the forests they destroyed.

18 New Topographics Photos That Could Have Been Made in the 1970s

From the series Urban Sprawl Emptiness © Emmanuel Monzon, Bellevue, Washington

Pie in the Sky © Lauren H. Adams, Southampton, NJ

Clubhouse, Daytona Beach, Florida 2006 © Damien Drew, NSW, Australia

Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap one year ago to connect photographers around the globe. Since then, more than twenty thousand photographers have submitted their work, and over one thousand have participated in the swap. The idea is to bring the joy of making and collecting photographs into the digital age. Anyone can submit photos via Instagram by tagging them #theprintswap. Outstanding submissions are chosen as winners and printed at Skink Ink in Brooklyn. From there, they are mailed out to winners all over the world. Prints are mailed out at random, so no one knows what print they’ll receive until it arrives at their doorstep.

The Print Swap includes work across all genres, and we sorted through the archive to put together this online group show, inspired by the historic 1975 exhibition New Topographics: Photographs of a Man-Altered Landscape at George Eastman House in Rochester, New York.

The Trauma of Life on Skid Row, in Photos

Genevine and Jennifer

Old Roses

Little Cat, Skid Row

Los Angeles photographer Suzanne Stein recently posted a picture of a badly abused, sick cat from Skid Row on her Instagram feed.

In my mind, it’s a photograph that could not have been made by anyone but Stein. She has been photographing life on Skid Row since the fall of 2015, and in the last year, she has borne witness to the acute suffering of others. She’s heard firsthand from survivors of rape and abuse. She’s befriended people who are addicted to heroin. She’s been in the presence of infections and illness, true life and death situations. And throughout all of it, a fundamental decency and humanity have remained at the heart of all her images. 

Shocking Photos Taken Behind-the-Scenes at Puppy Mills

Dogs in their cages at a puppy mill before being rescued. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals with the Montreal SPCA

A recently rescued dog receives care. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals with the Montreal SPCA

A recently rescued dog receives care. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals with the Montreal SPCA

In 2013, photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur was with the SPCA when they seized approximately 100 dogs from a puppy mill in rural Quebec. After a lifetime of living in confinement, about half a dozen pit bull-type were finally led into the open air. Their tails, once firmly tucked between their legs, started to relax. The rescuers spoke softly and offered their hands for the animals to sniff. Little by little, the wagging began.

Revealing the Cruelty of Bear Bile Farming, in Photos

A rescued Malayan sun bear at Free the Bears sanctuary in Cambodia © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

A newly rescued Asiatic moon bear. The bear is missing both front paws. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur will never forget the day she met Miracle the Asiatic moon bear in Vietnam in 2008.

Miracle had lived eight years in a bear bile farm, where the animals are forced to live in small cages and undergo repeated invasive extractions. The bear had just been saved by Animals Asia and brought to their rescue center in Tam Dao, but the signs of her former trauma were plainly visible. The bars on her cage were rusted shut, and the top of her head was covered in calluses, a result of many hours spent rubbing her head against the bars in frustration and despair.

A Rare Look Behind-the-Scenes at Veal and Dairy Farms

A calf looks up, still wet from birth. © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

A calf strains his head outside the bars of a crate enclosure while another lies dead next to him. © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

In 2010, photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur took a tour of a dairy farm in Spain. She saw farmers pull a calf from her inside her mother, and when the young cow was just 20 minutes old, she saw the young animal placed in a wheelbarrow and separated from her mother. The farmer named the newborn calf Jo-Anne, in the photographer’s honor.

The Suffering of Animals Farmed for Fur, in Photos

Calico fox in a fur farm in Europe © Jo-Anne McArthur / The Ghosts In Our Machine

Injured mink kits with their dead mother at a fur farm © Jo-Anne McArthur / Djurattsalliansen

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur usually smells a fur farm before she sees it. Her eyes water; her nose runs. It’s not just the smell of run-off from the feces; as she puts it, “Animals will emit specific scents when they’re afraid.”

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