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The Suffering of Animals Farmed for Fur, in Photos

Calico fox in a fur farm in Europe © Jo-Anne McArthur / The Ghosts In Our Machine

Injured mink kits with their dead mother at a fur farm © Jo-Anne McArthur / Djurattsalliansen

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur usually smells a fur farm before she sees it. Her eyes water; her nose runs. It’s not just the smell of run-off from the feces; as she puts it, “Animals will emit specific scents when they’re afraid.”

The Horrific Truth About Pigs in Factory Farms

A sow looks out between the bars of her gestation crate © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

Piglet fetuses in a dumpster © Jo-Anne McArthur / Essere Animali

When the photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur documents life inside a factory farm, she doesn’t touch a thing. She usually doesn’t have permission from the owners, and she enters at night with a security team. She has never broken anything, and she leaves the location exactly as she found it. She’s there to tell the truth, and that truth is worth running the risk of trespassing fines, and in some cases, bodily harm.

One Photographer’s Fight for the Hudson River in New York

“This is our Standing Rock,” photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood says of the Hudson River.

6 Photo Editors Discuss How They Use Instagram to Find New Talent

© Amr Alfiqy for TIME LightBox, photographer discovered via IG by photo editor Olivier Laurent

While for many years social media has been seen as a tool for procrastination, more and more photographers are recognising the professional benefits of using it to market their photography. The immediacy and accessibility of Instagram are in part what make it so useful to photo editors, art buyers and companies that need to find new work or hire the appropriate person for a commission.

In our recent guide to using Instagram hashtags made in collaboration with PhotoShelter (which you can download for free here) we emphasized the importance of using hashtags to help your work get seen by the right audiences. Following on from this we spoke with six photo editors who gave us insight into how they use Instagram to find and follow the ongoing work of emerging and established photographers.

When She Was Battling Cancer, This Photographer Turned to Her Dog

When photographer Jenny Cardoni was diagnosed with Burkitt’s Lymphoma, she felt isolated. She found few people who had undergone treatment, and since the cancer mostly affects men, she had no women to talk to about the experience. Over the course of nearly a year of chemotherapy, surgeries, and spinal taps, her immune system was weakened, meaning that she couldn’t do much with other people.

But she always had her dog Finley.

Poignant, Playful Photos of the Stray Dogs of India

A hungry dog.

A stray puppy at Varanasi Ghat.

A kid plays with a street dog.

Mumbai photographer Neenad Joseph Arul used to be shy about approaching people, so instead, he turned to the dogs in his neighborhood. Unlike people, the stray animals were never judgmental, and they didn’t mind being photographed. Over time, what started for Arul as a simple lesson in street photography evolved into a longterm relationship with the city’s canine inhabitants.

Voyeuristic Photos of Tokyo Commuters on the Way to Work

Michael Wolf makes rush hour last an eternity. Now in its fourth edition, his smash-hit book Tokyo Compression– along with the coinciding exhibition by Blue Lotus Gallery chronicles countless weekday mornings on the city’s packed subway cars, where human bodies, their breath and their sweat, leave dewdrops of condensation on the glass.

145 Minimal Photos Find Magic In the Mundane

© Lulu Ash (@luluashstudio)

For our latest group show, we invited you to submit your minimalist photographs. Curated by Lucy Pike, Head of Photography Partnerships at WeTransfer, in collaboration with Feature Shoot Editor-in-Chief Alison Zavos, the final collection of images is bound not by their subject matter but by their form. Minimalism is huge these days, especially on Instagram, and this is unsurprisingly our biggest group show to date. Winning images run the gamut from representational to abstract; they find lyricism in the mundane, poetry in the prosaic.

Congratulations to our Grand Prize Winner Lulu Ash. Her photograph of a Swahili fisherman at his traditional sail boat in Kenya will be showcased as a WeTransfer wallpaper, where it will be seen by an estimated audience of 10 million people.

One Father’s Photos of the Magic of Childhood

“As we age,” Kentucky photographer Adrian C. Murray says, “we tend to forget the wonder that comes with being young.”

50 Years Later, The Courage of Gordon Parks

Untitled, Shady Grove, Alabama, 1956. © The Gordon Parks Foundation from the book I AM YOU: Selected Works, 1942–1978 by Gordon Parks, published by Steidl

The Fontenelles at the Poverty Board, Harlem, New York, 1967 © The Gordon Parks Foundation from the book I AM YOU: Selected Works, 1942–1978 by Gordon Parks, published by Steidl

I Am You, the new book of Gordon Parks photographs published by Steidl, The Gordon Parks Foundation, and C/O Berlin, draws its title from a 1967 Life photo essay called A Harlem Family, in which the photojournalist told the story of an African American couple named Bessie and Norman Fontenelle as they struggled to feed and clothe their nine children. Parks penned the introduction himself, beginning with the following lines:

“What I want. What I am. What you force me to be is what you are. For I am you, staring back from a mirror of poverty and despair, of revolt and freedom […] There is something about both of us that goes deeper than blood or black and white. It is our common search for a better life, a better world.”

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