Posts tagged: fashion photography

Apocalyptic Photographs of Divine Beings Warn of a Dark Future for Planet Earth

The Prophecy-1


The waters of bay run red with the blood and offal from an adjacent slaughterhouse, the sand dyed black with thick oil running back into the ocean. The fish are dying, and the scent is fowl and unforgettable, and as much as the scene resembles something from the apocalypse, the end of days, it actually happened. This is Hann Bay in Senegal, a once beautiful beach now poisoned by waste and closed to the swimmers and surfers that once called it a paradise. For The Prophecy, Dakar-based photographer Fabrice Monteiro paired up with designer Doulsy and the Ecofund Organization to tell the frightful tale of pollution in West Africa.

Delightfully Bizarre Editorial Pairs Elaborate Jell-O Concoctions with Vintage-Inspired Fall Fashion



If there’s one food item that has continued to beguile the American masses over the last century, it’s jello. Since it first graced the pages of Ladies’ Home Journal at the turn of the century, the animal bone-derived product has gone on to become a staple of the suburban household, promising picture-perfect domesticity for busy mid-century moms. Jell-O could be sweet or savory, appearing both as desserts and in salad form with congealed vegetables and meats. For the Nowstalgia issue of PAPERMAG, Los Angeles-based photography duo JUCO—composed of Julia Galdo and Cody Cloud—takes on the most revolting and enchanting edible from our shared past, pairing surreal (and all too real) jello molds with fall’s hottest vintage fashions.

Nude Photo Series Celebrates the Tattooed Male Model


Ricki Hall at Nevs


Asher at AMCK

For London-based photographer Danny Baldwin, getting inked can be a powerful means of asserting autonomy and of defying the confines of others’ perceptions and assumptions. Where once the fashion community snubbed heavily tattooed bodies, Baldwin has witnessed recent deviations from the standard clean-shaven masculine ideal to one that embraces otherness and self-expression. Skin Deep, an exhibition of more than one hundred photographs of nude male models exposing their ink, is his ode to the intersections between two mainstream art forms—fashion and photography—with the art of the tattoo.

Photographer Amos Mac Puts Trans Issues in the Spotlight



There are so many people in the world who have not had the privilege of a realistic or fair representation. The framing may be wrong; they may be fetishised as a subject, or perhaps the angles are pushed forward with a strange kind of inherent bias. It’s prevalent in all forms of art, in television and in film, but in photography these discrepancies become even more apparent. Only 8 black women have been on the cover of vogue in its 132 year history. Trans women or trans men certainly have not been at all. The fashion world is still invested in superiority, especially when it comes to beauty. But it feels like things are changing slowly, and as always, those who have been pushed to the side work twice as hard to show their work (which is often twice as interesting and genre breaking.) Amos Mac exemplifies this artistic fashion resistance.

Celebrity and Fashion Photographer Max Montgomery Talks Inspiration, Travel, and Heidi Klum (Sponsored by Squarespace)


From the Squarespace website of Max Montgomery



For New York-based fashion and portrait photographer Max Montgomery, image-making is second-nature. When he isn’t shooting covers for leading magazines, he’s snapping away just for the joy of the craft, capturing candid and unfiltered moments in the lives of everyone from A-list celebrities to passersby on the street. Whether they’re commissioned or personal, Montgomery’s images capture what is alluring and fantastical about fashion and beauty while remaining true to the grit and serendipity of real life moments. The photographer’s extensive portfolio, visible on his Squarespace website, is a testament to the dedication and finesse that comes with never slowing down.

The Electrifying Fashion Photography of Polina Vinogradova


Polina Vinogradova’s Squarespace website


Soundvenue Magazine


VICE Denmark

Looking through the portfolio of Copenhagen-based photographer Polina Vinogradova is a bit like receiving a jolt of electricity, like being transported into a fantasy wherein colors shine brighter and shapes more bold; her editorial spreads and live event snaps have that je ne sais quoi that costume designer Edith Head might have called an instinctual understanding of the “language” of fashion. Vinogradova herself calls it an “energy,” something that pulsates at the center of her diverse body of work, visible on her Squarespace website.

Welcome to Miss Muslimah, a Beauty Pageant for Muslim Women


Finalists have a last meal during preparations for the Grand Finale on November 21st, 2014


Fatma Ben Guefrache of Tunisia is crowned Muss Muslimah 2014 at The Grand Finale of the Miss Muslimah World Competition on November 21st, 2014.


The World Muslimah Award is unlike any other beauty pageant in the world, substituting headscarfs for bathing suits, spiritual piety for baton twirling, and a jury of orphaned children for a set of celebrity panelists. In 2014, Istanbul-based photojournalist Monique Jaques ventured to Yogakarta, Indonesia, where the competition of eighteen young hopefuls unfolded against a backdrop in which Islamic mosques stood alongside Buddhist and Hindu temples.

Mid-Century Burlesque Stars Prove That Beauty Has No Age Limit


Angel Carter, Pahrump, Nevada, 2012


Val Valentine, Toledo, Ohio, 2012


April March, Saratoga Springs, New York, 2012

The burlesque dancers of the mid-20th century, suggests French photographer Marie Baronnet, were feminists in a time before feminism. In a country wherein women were limited mostly to the home—and where female sexuality was overlooked by both science and society at large—they traveled the states, paving their own roads by doing what they loved to do. For Legends: The Living Art of Risque, Baronnet tracked down these women, now in their mid-sixties to mid-nineties, dusted off their timeworn costumes, and embarked on an unforgettable journey down memory lane.

Fashion Film Asks Teenage Girls, ‘If You Could Be Any Animal, What Would It Be?’

For Fashionable Animal, New York City-based artist Gigi Ben Artzi and fashion designer Elle Sasson invite a group of five teenage girls to imagine life in the animal kingdom, asking, “If you could be any animal, what would it be?”

Photographer Dons Her Late Mother’s Clothes in Incredibly Moving Photo Series


“Holiday” clothes. It’s summer; the intensively bright sun, the smell of freshly brewed coffee and mom’s voice wakes us up. I have a quick peek through the curtains, a line of washing must have been hung outside early in the morning; it looks completely dry. I cannot see anyone, but I know she’s there. I crane my neck, and I am just able to make out blonde locks and cigarette smoke. The morning “gossip” with the neighbors is in full swing. Bare-footed and in pajamas, my sister and I jump out on the balcony and join the discussion. We love summer. We have our mom to ourselves for a whole 2 months of holidays.


“Winter” clothes. She would leave for work in darkness; we would all be still asleep. She would take a red bus to her work at the music school. We didn’t have a car. Waiting for the bus, bitter cold, the uncertainty whether it would come, shifting from foot to foot. On the way back she would do the shopping. She would move slowly with heavy bags, being careful not to slip. Freezing cold, with a red nose and cheeks, she would enter the house. Every night her soaked black boots would stand in a puddle of melted snow under a radiator in the kitchen.

Polish photographer Karolina Jonderko embarked on Self-portrait with my Mother without any intention of releasing the images. The pictures she made were for herself and for her mother, a way of grieving and way of feeling near to the woman who had raised her and passed away. Four years after losing her mother, Jonderko found her once more by trying on the clothing she left behind.