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Posts tagged: fashion photography

Fashion-Forward Photos of Women in Nature by Tracy Morford

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© Tracy Morford / Offset

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© Tracy Morford / Offset

For Austin-based photographer Tracy Morford, fashion is a means of exploring personal themes as well as telling universal stories. Since growing up in the wooded landscape of Central New York, the artist has felt a profound connection with nature, one which she returns to by capturing solitary women as they gallop through verdant pastures or dip their toes in passing streams.

A Photographer Captures the Strange World of Fashion’s Elite

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For L’Habit fait Le Moine, French photographer Charles-Henry Bédué infiltrates some of the most exclusive fashion shows and brand events in China and Paris. Making his living as an event photographer, the artist explains that he initially felt alienated amidst the hoards of glitterati. The only remedy for his discomfort was to push the crowded scenes further into the realm of abstraction, capturing alluring glimpses of color and form caught within the sea of high fashion glamour.

John Malkovich Recreates History’s Most Iconic Photographs

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Dorothea Lange / Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California (1936), 2014

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Albert Watson / Alfred Hitchcock with Goose (1973), 2014

For Malkovich, Malkovich, Malkovich: Homage to Photographic Masters, legendary portrait photographer Sandro Miller collaborates with longtime friend John Malkovich to reproduce the most iconic images of our time, with Malkovich adopting the role of recognizable characters like Marilyn Monroe, Albert Einstein, and the identical twins of Diane Arbus.

Mother as Muse: A Fashion Shoot Features an Unlikely Model

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When Charlie Engman first photographed his mother, Kathleen, he noticed there was a stark difference between his mother in real life and the woman who appeared in the photographs. “I couldn’t really recognize her in the images, or rather, I recognized her in unfamiliar ways,” he explained in a recent interview. He began photographing her more frequently, and over time his mother has become something of a muse for Engman. It wasn’t until years later, when commissioned for a fashion editorial shoot by Hungarian magazine The Room, that he decided to cast his mother as the model, in a series simply titled, MOM.

Captivating Photographs of Trauma Survivors Reenacting Scenes from a Missoni Catalogue

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For her photography and video project Tractatus 7, photographer Denise Prince reveals what is normally hidden and repressed within the human mind. In replicating a catalogue by high-end fashion house Missoni, she replaces heavily retouched models with individuals who have undergone severe physical trauma. Asking us to confront painful experiences that escape comprehension, she breaks through the allure of fantasy and invites us to peer beneath the glamour of fashion and into a reality we rarely allow ourselves to enter. Here, the idyllic beachside of the catalog is revealed to be a mere studio set, and Prince’s subjects are left speechless, forced to reconcile who they believed they were with a newly-emerging self. We spoke to Prince about the project.

Quirky Fashion Series Features Upside-Down Models

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For Fortune Cookie, photographer Martin Tremblay, also known as Pinch, turns the fashion world upside down, literally. As part of a shoot commissioned by London-based Schön! Magazine, he captures models floating, their heads planted on an overturned floor. Though the planet is jarringly inverted, normal life continues unchanged while fantastical female muses clad in Dolce & Gabbana, Marie Saint Pierre, and Givenchy adapt to a reverse gravitational pull. Here, the world of fashion and the mundanities of the everyday exist both in harmony and in conflict, moving in opposite directions and yet unified under a single, vibrant aesthetic.

Kiss Me Like You Mean It: Intimate Photos by Rankin Capture the French Kiss

Retrospective / Snog

Retrospective / Snog

For his delightful series Snog, fashion and portrait photographer Rankin captures couples of all genders, races, and ages engaged in passionate kisses. Hoping to challenge cultural taboos surrounding public displays of affection, he finds moments of sexual abandon normally reserved for secret, hidden spaces. Hurled amidst the tangle of tongues, the mess of lipstick, and the inevitable clashing of teeth, we are forced to confront our own discomfort, allowing it to give way to an invigorated celebration of love.

Photo du Jour: An Illusive Poolside Nymph

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Sois Belle …

Annelie Vandendael is not your typical fashion photographer. Her models are often partially obscured or surreally headless, the lovely forms always evading a direct gaze. Vandendael is concerned with loss of identity in the standard fashion photo, a genre where women are often heavily manipulated and edited until there is no trace of reality.

Sweet Family-Style Portraits of Farm Animals

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With his touching series The Farm Family, Brooklyn-based photographer Rob MacInnis shoots barn animals in the style of fashion magazine spreads. Freeing the soulful creatures from the context of the lowly barnyard and challenging rituals of human consumption, he wittily and heartbreakingly captures sheep, cows, and goats in Annie Leibovitz-inspired portraits and panoramas. Staged between bales of hay and a snowy doorway resembling a dreamy film screen, the humble beasts find themselves suddenly under floodlights, before a camera that catches their sweet dignity.

Portraits of Underground Cirque Troupe Lucent Dossier

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In collaboration with the Lucent Dossier underground cirque troupe, photographer August Bradley presents A Theater of Darkness, an enchanting visual narrative filled with curiosity and terror. As if birthed from the pages of an H.G. Wells novel, Bradley’s circus characters are confined to an old, anachronistic vaudeville theater—long after their performances, they lurk in the steampunk underground, yearning for the outside world and hoping for escape.