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Posts tagged: black and white photography

Arresting Photos of Los Israelitas, an Evangelical Community in Peru

Stan Raucher

A Sabbath Prayer

Stan Raucher

To the Sanctuary

Those who choose to live outside the norm, especially those who follow a religious leader, captivate the public imagination. Seattle-based photographer Stan Raucher felt this draw when, after a photo workshop in Peru in 2013, he happened to end up traveling down the Amazon River by boat with several members of Los Israelitas, a small, evangelical sect in Peru who live along the riverbank. For his project The New Promised LandRaucher made two trips to visit the community and plans to return next year. He spoke with me via email about the project, which I saw in Critical Mass 2013.

Dreamlike Photos of Tokyo in the 1970s and 1980s

Issei Suda

© 2014 Issei Suda. Courtesy Nazraeli Press

Issei Suda

© 2014 Issei Suda. Courtesy Nazraeli Press

Photographer Issei Suda, born in Tokyo in 1940 and raised through the war and post-war years, has documented the changing face of his city throughout the course of his career. Tokyokei, published by Nazraeli Press, is a group of 106 previously unpublished photos depicting daily life in Tokyo in the 1970s and 1980s. Compared with the more popularized visions of the modern-day megacity, Suda captures a stillness, a moment of pause, in the much quieter city streets, even in the midst of a degree of hustle and bustle.

Jet Setters: St. Maarten Sunbathers Share Beach with Passenger Jets Flying Only 13 Feet Above

Josef Hoflehner

Josef Hoflehner

Bizarre black and white beach scenes, featuring planes zooming alarmingly closely overhead are the focus of Austria-based photographer Josef Hoflehner‘s Jet Airliner, now on view at Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla, California.

Shameless Internet Scammer Cons Austin-Based Photographer Out of Prints and Profits

Polly Chandler

Seagulls © Polly Chandler. Available for purchase as part of the artist’s fundraiser.

Polly Chandler

Cracked Heart © Polly Chandler. Available for purchase as part of the artist’s fundraiser.

Austin-based photographer Polly Chandler, beloved in the photo community for her beautiful, storied photographs as well as for her winning personality, was recently the victim of an Internet scam that left her bank account wiped out. The short version is this: After much email correspondence, a collector in England purchased two of her limited edition prints with a cashier’s check. Wells Fargo, Chandler’s bank, made the funds available, only to determine weeks later, money spent, that the check had been a fake. This left her account not only drained but also, incredibly, accruing overdraft fees. Chandler is having a print sale to help her recoup her losses. It ends, oddly enough, this Friday, June 13. To purchase one of her ridiculously under-priced prints (for this sale only), contact her through her website or Facebook page. Chandler was generous enough to share her story, as well as thoughts about her work, with us.

Shot Over 20 Years, Photos Portray an Endearing Array of Animal Emotions

Michel Vanden Eeckhoudt

India, 2008 © Michel Vanden Eeckhoudt

Michel Vanden Eeckhoudt

Belgium, 2008 © Michel Vanden Eeckhoudt/Vu

It would be hard to imagine a time when images of animals were more popular than they are now. Whether or not you are a fan of the near inescapable stream of animal photos and videos available at all times online, it is unquestionable that animals can be endless entertainment. In Bittersweet, published by Kehrer Verlag, Brussels-based photographer Michel Vanden Eeckhoudt‘s photos, largely of animals and spanning much of the globe and almost 20 years, take a very different look at this exceedingly popular subject. 

Photographs Convey a Childlike Curiosity of the Natural World

Cheryle St. Onge

Cheryle St. Onge

New England artist and 2009 Guggenheim Fellow Cheryle St. Onge makes large-format photographs about science, observation, and knowledge. Her pictures express the states of learning, looking, and wondering. 

Photos Reveal An Imaginary World of Miniature Animals

Andrea Buzzichelli

Andrea Buzzichelli

Much of America’s population is probably pretty tired of snow, but I’ve been enjoying looking at these soft, snowy pictures by the Italian artist Andrea Buzzichelli. I always think photographs that play with scale and perspective are fun, but there’s also something really sad about these photos to me. 

Gripping Photos of Forensic Facial Reconstruction Sculptures of Suspected Murder Victims

Arne Svenson

© Arne Svenson. Courtesy Julie Saul Gallery, NYC.

Arne Svenson

© Arne Svenson. Courtesy Julie Saul Gallery, NYC.

At first glance, NYC-based photographer Arne Svenson’s stark portraits of sculpted heads are deceptively amusing. However, Unspeaking Likeness is a series of deeply unfunny photographs of forensic facial reconstruction sculptures of suspected murder victims. 

Available Light: Harold Feinstein’s Coney Island at Night

Harold_Feinstein_Photography

Over the years, the face of Coney Island has reflected waves of immigration and shifting neighborhoods. Here Orthodox Jews, African Americans, Italians, Russians, Puerto Ricans and folks from all over the world were drawn together by the lure of the surf, sand, boardwalks, side-shows, Nathan’s hot dogs, and the permission to leave go of all inhibitions.—Harold Feinstein

Photographer Harold Feinstein was born in Coney Island, Brooklyn in 1931. His legendary street photos, shots from the Korean War, portraits, nudes, and images from nature are all the result of a distinct talent and magical eye. But it’s the portraits of his birthplace—which he photographed for six decades—that really sing.
In these photos of Coney Island shot at night, Feinstein used his Rolleiflex and the play of dark and light to capture both the thrills and wonder of Coney Island with an intimacy all too often missing in street photography. Clearly, if a place can act as a muse, Feinstein found his next to the seaside in a corner of Brooklyn.

Harold_Feinstein_Photography

The Other Jersey Shore: A Photographer’s Intimate Portrait of a Community on the Rocks

Ester_Jove_Soligue_Photography

This project inspired me to keep doing projects that are meaningful [to me] and hopefully to others. It [also] proved to me that it is possible to make a difference, even if it is a small one. As documentary photographers, we start with a strong belief in this, but many times feel the frustration of not always seeing this difference. After this work was published [on a larger scale], a beautiful woman named Susan from upstate New York contacted me offering her help. She bought sleeping bags and thermal material for them to use in the winter, that I [ended up] distributing. It was encouraging.—Ester Jové Soligue