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Posts tagged: black and white photography

Photos of Winter Waves Capture the Power of Mother Nature

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For his series Wave Pacific, photographer Scott Hoyle captures that chaotic and sublime moment when two opposing forces simultaneously collide together in a burst of emotion. In stark black and white, each violent crash is unique in shape and form. The dark background in contrast with the whiteness of the wave indicates an absence of location and environmental reference. These waves could be anywhere.

Fascinating Images Show the Movement of Snails Through Sand on the Beach

Daniel Ranalli

Daniel Ranalli

Boston-area artist Daniel Ranalli has spent 25 years engaging and collaborating with nature in his artwork. In his Snail Drawings series, Ranalli arranges snails on a beach and photographs the patterns they make as they move through the sand and around rocks. The “before and after” diptychs are fascinating to look at.

Welsh Taxi Driver Photographs His Diverse Passengers

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The job of a taxi driver is not limited to the safe transportation of people from one location to another. Willing to lend their ears to candid stories, personal secrets and rants of their many passengers; taxi drivers are confidants and impromptu counsellors, if only for the duration of metered fare. This fascination with people is what drew taxi driver Mike Harvey to photograph the wide array of passengers he met on a daily basis, for his series titled Taxi.

A Pediatrician’s Moving Photographs of Children at Play in Developing Countries

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As a pediatrician, Calvin Chen sees children at their best and their worst. He says his job is about how to “keep kids safe and healthy,” but during his travels to developing countries, he began to realize that “these two adjectives may not always coincide.”

Perhaps due to his natural ease around children, Chen’s photographs are candid, playful, and provide an intimate look into their lives. Not afraid to enter the fray, his close proximity to his subjects place the viewer into each activity, whether it’s a stickball game in the street, or a swim in the river.

Photographer Ayumi Tanaka’s Stunning Dioramas Made From Layered Negatives and Found Objects

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Japanese-born artist Ayumi Tanaka’s series Wish You Were Here pushes the boundaries of traditional photography in this series derived from memories of her childhood. Rather than replicate exact experiences, Tanaka strives to convey the emotions behind these events through photo-collages that are packed with symbolism. The resulting tableaus mesh personal recollections of her childhood with traditional Japanese fairytales.

An Up Close and Personal Survey of the Tiny Critters in American Backyards

Joshua White

Joshua White

I was attracted to Joshua White’s project, A Photographic Survey of the American Yard, upon first glance, but I really fell in love with the impressively comprehensive series while carefully going through the massive amount of pictures. White lives and works in Boone, North Carolina, and his survey consists of over 400 images, all cataloging the various flora and fauna of the typical backyard.

Arresting Photos of Los Israelitas, an Evangelical Community in Peru

Stan Raucher

A Sabbath Prayer

Stan Raucher

To the Sanctuary

Those who choose to live outside the norm, especially those who follow a religious leader, captivate the public imagination. Seattle-based photographer Stan Raucher felt this draw when, after a photo workshop in Peru in 2013, he happened to end up traveling down the Amazon River by boat with several members of Los Israelitas, a small, evangelical sect in Peru who live along the riverbank. For his project The New Promised LandRaucher made two trips to visit the community and plans to return next year. He spoke with me via email about the project, which I saw in Critical Mass 2013.

Dreamlike Photos of Tokyo in the 1970s and 1980s

Issei Suda

© 2014 Issei Suda. Courtesy Nazraeli Press

Issei Suda

© 2014 Issei Suda. Courtesy Nazraeli Press

Photographer Issei Suda, born in Tokyo in 1940 and raised through the war and post-war years, has documented the changing face of his city throughout the course of his career. Tokyokei, published by Nazraeli Press, is a group of 106 previously unpublished photos depicting daily life in Tokyo in the 1970s and 1980s. Compared with the more popularized visions of the modern-day megacity, Suda captures a stillness, a moment of pause, in the much quieter city streets, even in the midst of a degree of hustle and bustle.

Jet Setters: St. Maarten Sunbathers Share Beach with Passenger Jets Flying Only 13 Feet Above

Josef Hoflehner

Josef Hoflehner

Bizarre black and white beach scenes, featuring planes zooming alarmingly closely overhead are the focus of Austria-based photographer Josef Hoflehner‘s Jet Airliner, now on view at Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla, California.

Shameless Internet Scammer Cons Austin-Based Photographer Out of Prints and Profits

Polly Chandler

Seagulls © Polly Chandler. Available for purchase as part of the artist’s fundraiser.

Polly Chandler

Cracked Heart © Polly Chandler. Available for purchase as part of the artist’s fundraiser.

Austin-based photographer Polly Chandler, beloved in the photo community for her beautiful, storied photographs as well as for her winning personality, was recently the victim of an Internet scam that left her bank account wiped out. The short version is this: After much email correspondence, a collector in England purchased two of her limited edition prints with a cashier’s check. Wells Fargo, Chandler’s bank, made the funds available, only to determine weeks later, money spent, that the check had been a fake. This left her account not only drained but also, incredibly, accruing overdraft fees. Chandler is having a print sale to help her recoup her losses. It ends, oddly enough, this Friday, June 13. To purchase one of her ridiculously under-priced prints (for this sale only), contact her through her website or Facebook page. Chandler was generous enough to share her story, as well as thoughts about her work, with us.