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Posts tagged: landscape photography

Call for Entries: The RPS International Photography Exhibition

Rose in a Fox Mask © Melanie Eclare

Abrigo Corner 1 © Tom Blachford

The International Photography Exhibition by The Royal Photographic Society has been a fixture of the photography community since 1854, just fifteen years after the invention and introduction of practical photography. Now in it’s 160th year, the IPE is the single longest-running photography competition of its kind, allowing contemporary photographers to follow in the footsteps of early exhibitors like Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Steichen, and Roger Fenton.

For this year’s worldwide call for submissions, the RPS has once again opened its doors to photographers of all backgrounds, working in all genres. As always, there is no fixed theme, making IPE one of the most consistently diverse photography exhibitions in the world.

One Photographer’s Fight for the Hudson River in New York

“This is our Standing Rock,” photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood says of the Hudson River.

Photos of the Last Remaining American Drive-In Theaters

Frontier Drive-In, Center, Colorado. Abandoned
“The Frontier Drive-In was possibly my favorite location that in hindsight I wish I had given more time to. As we drove down this long highway surrounded by nothing, we were heading straight towards the biggest rain cloud I have ever seen. As soon as we had the theatre in our sights, the torrential rain started. My assistant and I sat in the car for nearly an hour, until finally we got a 10-minute break in the rain.”

East Hartford Drive-In, South Windsor, Connecticut. Abandoned
“The shoot at East Hartford was very special because I got to create a photograph that had been in my head since the beginning of this project. I found a model who also had an amazing vintage car he was willing to drive back into the unmaintained lot. Of course it started to rain as soon as we arrived, so I had to work quickly, but we were able to create one of my favorite images from the trip.”

In the summer of 2014, Portland photographer Lindsey Rickert packed up her life and hit the road in search of drive-in movie theaters around the county. Some had been closed and deserted; others had adapted to a swiftly-changing market and were still in business. In total, she spent over two months in her car, traversing an estimated 12,022 miles across the United States.

A Fairytale World Hidden in the Landscapes of Sweden

As a child, Swedish photographer Isabella Stahl spent her days with the horses in the stable. She and the other kids in her village swam in the lakes and rivers and hiked through the woods. They munched on candy and explored the landscape surrounding their farms and houses, and one of the children’s dogs usually came along for the journey. They read ghost stories.

A Photographer Retells the History of the American Southwest (Sponsored)

Saguaro, Sonoran Desert, Arizona, photographed with the Lensbaby Edge 50 Optic

MV Motel, Mesquite, Nevada, photographed with the Lensbaby Sweet 35 Optic

Nathan Cowlishaw wants to rewrite the history of landscape photography. The photographer, who is from Utah originally, doesn’t romanticize the sprawling terrain of the American Southwest; his experience of home is eternally shaped by the heritage and experiences of the Indigenous Peoples who populated it long before the arrival of European and American settlers.

Over the course of days spent on the road, the photographer has made beautiful pictures of the desert, but behind their aesthetic appeal lies a sincere wish to correct the wrongdoings and oversights of the past. Cowlishaw’s Southwestern States aren’t the ones you’ll find in the conventional storybooks. They’re the ones passed down from generation to generation of Native Peoples.

The Bloody History of Colonization in Tasmania, in Photos

Eliza Pross is a descendant of Truganini who is famed as being one of the last full blooded Tasmanian Aboriginals. Eliza’s family is from Bruny Island, the home of Truganini.

Risdon Cove Massacre, 1804. Facts about deaths at this site are highly debated. One group claim that less than three Aboriginal people were killed during the conflict, while the majority of historians claim that over 30 Aboriginals were slaughtered. Image is overlaid with a John Glover painting.

When Australian photographer Aletheia Casey was a child, she didn’t learn about any of the frontier conflicts of the time of settlement and colonization in Australia, and she didn’t learn about The Black War in the island state of Tasmania. For the most part, she was told about heroic European settlers, who tamed the wild terrain of Australia at the beginning of the 19th century and built their homes and farms across the land.

When She Was Battling Cancer, This Photographer Turned to Her Dog

When photographer Jenny Cardoni was diagnosed with Burkitt’s Lymphoma, she felt isolated. She found few people who had undergone treatment, and since the cancer mostly affects men, she had no women to talk to about the experience. Over the course of nearly a year of chemotherapy, surgeries, and spinal taps, her immune system was weakened, meaning that she couldn’t do much with other people.

But she always had her dog Finley.

One Father’s Photos of the Magic of Childhood

“As we age,” Kentucky photographer Adrian C. Murray says, “we tend to forget the wonder that comes with being young.”

The Colorblind Photographer Who Was Meant to Be an Astronaut

“My dream was to be an astronaut,” photographer and filmmaker Vinnoth Krishnan remembers of his childhood. He spent his days watching films like Alien and Blade Runner on VHS, rewinding to see his favorite parts over and over again. These scenes meant so much to him that he once accidentally started a fire while trying to recreate them with his parents’ electronics. Whenever his stomach hurt, he imagined a real alien squirming inside.

The Man Who Photographed a Forgotten America by Moonlight

Late Arrival, 2011

Diner, 2011

Noel Kerns is an American time traveler. His camera has taken him on road trips across Texas, down Route 66, and through the ghost towns of the American West. He’s found these bygone patches of the United States under the light of the full moon, synching his trips with the calendar of lunar phases.

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