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Posts tagged: landscape photography

Poignant Photos of a Man in the Final Year of His Life

Hugo, the oldest man in the town of Las Cascadas, spends time sitting in his couch watching how the wind moves the trees on his farm on a cold winter day on July 25th, 2016.

From his farm in southern Chile, Hugo says the Osorno Volcano is majestic, imposing, and the most beautiful in the world. While this view has been with him every day, he often confuses it with other volcanos.

Years ago, two men, Hugo Küschel and Teodoro Hofmann, lived in the village of Las Cascadas, Chile. Here, they tended their farms, raised their families, and became dear friends. Teodoro passed away in 1978, but more than thirty-five years later, his granddaughter, the photographer Constanza Hevia H., would meet Hugo for the first time. By then, Hugo was the oldest man living in Las Cascadas, and he and his wife Wilma spent their time inside their house, where the photographer became a regular visitor. “One day, I asked Hugo if he was afraid of death,” she says. “He told me, ‘Look, I look at it in this way: tomorrow or the day after tomorrow, one has to leave this earth.'” The Time I Have Left is her record of Hugo’s memories and the final chapter of his life.

Poetic Photos from an Anti-Drilling Protest Camp

Last year, the photographer Ben Terzza spent many evenings exploring the Bury Hill Wood in Surrey, England. During one quiet sunset, he happened across a Fallow Deer, accompanied by her fawn. “These woods are quite secluded so there’s hardly anyone ever up there,” he remembers. All was peaceful, but the meeting was bittersweet, tainted by the knowledge that the landscape was at risk. Over the summer, Terzza would help tell the story of a place called Leith Hill, looming plans for drilling in the area, and the protest camp fighting for its future.

Join Us in Brooklyn for The Print Swap Holiday Exhibition!

Photos (clockwise from left): @bottenvikenmatters@tinetti_julie@alixjoyce@konrad.jpg

Plastic Planet © Wolf Silveri (@wolf.silveri), Rosenheim, Germany

Every Day is a Gift © Deborah Hodges (@debhodges), Gig Harbor, WA

In 2016, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap in hopes of connecting photographers across the world. Eight international exhibitions later and with more on the way, we’re thrilled to announce the largest Print Swap show ever, taking place at the beautiful ROOT Studios in Brooklyn on December 13th. This will be our second holiday party, and every single photographer who participated in the swap between mid-September and mid-November will exhibit their work. We have artists from all over the globe represented, and with some of them traveling from faraway locales to attend, it will surely be a night to remember. If you’re in town, be sure to RSVP here.

This Photographer Will Make You See LA In a Whole New Way

From Bryan Brandon’s Squarespace website

With an Instagram following of more than 38,000, the self-taught photographer Bryan Brandon is a Renaissance man for the 21st century, mixing and matching influences from the street, architecture, and cinema. He’s explored the natural wonders of national parks in the American Southwest and some of the most dynamic metropolises in the world, but Los Angeles is currently his home base and primary playground.

You can find him out and about exploring its bustling streets and beaches, chasing down sunsets and spontaneous portraits. With a portfolio full of vibrant lifestyle imagery, Brandon captures the sense of movement and diversity that makes great cities thrum with energy. He’s tapped into the aesthetic of wanderlust, and he’s invited us all along for the journey, even if it’s only a walk down the street.

Brandon creates commercial photographs that feel personal, authentic, and real, and he knew he had to have just the right website design to stand out from the competition. Using Squarespace, he built his own domain and selected the perfect website template; with one click, clients and followers can immerse themselves in the photographer’s universe, where looming skyscrapers and mountaintops stand waiting to be explored. Thanks to the Squarespace website builder, Brandon was also able to create his own online store, where people can buy his coveted presets. We spoke with him about his unconventional start in the photo industry, his favorite cities, and his stunning website.

Submit to #ThePrintSwap for a Chance at $500 + An Exhibition in Sydney


The Other Art Fair, Sydney

When Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap back in 2016, we could not have anticipated that the worldwide phenomenon it would become. Photographers simply tag their images #theprintswap on Instagram, and our editors select outstanding submissions to be part of a worldwide swap that transcends geographical boundaries.

Now, we’re giving Print Swap photographers an exciting new opportunity.

We’re inviting everyone who participates in The Print Swap between now and January 15 to pitch us their dream photography project. We’ll consider all your ideas, and we’ll give three photographers $500 each to bring their visions to life. Once the projects are completed, they’ll be debuted exclusively right here on Feature Shoot and showcased across all our social channels.

We’re also thrilled to announce that our tenth exhibition–and second show in Sydney–will be at The Other Art Fair in March 2019. Carly Earl, Picture Editor at The Guardian Australia, will be our guest curator, and only photos submitted now through January 15th will be eligible for consideration for the show.

Exhibiting images will be announced shortly after the deadline.

Presented by Saatchi Art, The Other Art Fair Sydney is the preeminent destination for emerging artists and collectors throughout Australia. Now in its fifth year, the 2019 edition will take place at the Australian Technology Park in Eveleigh. Known around the world as a bridge between up-and-coming artists and established gallerists, The Other Art Fair spans continents with editions throughout the UK, the US, and Australia. This will be the second time The Print Swap has exhibited at The Other Art Fair; earlier this year, 24 images from the project were shown as part of the London fair.

Carly Earl has been a leading picture editor in Sydney for more than eight years; before arriving at The Guardian, she held posts at The Daily Telegraph and Sunday Telegraph. Throughout her career, she has also sat on juries for some of the nation’s most esteemed competitions and awards. Earl will select a total of 25 photographs from The Print Swap to exhibit at the Australian Technology Park. All photographers who participate in The Print Swap during the judging period will be considered for the exhibition, but inclusion in The Print Swap will not necessarily mean inclusion the final collection.

While judging for exhibitions and other opportunities takes place during fixed time periods, The Print Swap is open year-round for submissions. It’s free to submit, but selected photographers pay $40 per image to participate. This fee covers printing and shipping in full, and every Print Swap photographer gives a print and receives a print from someone else somewhere in the world. The fun part is that prints are mailed out at random, so you never know if you’ll get a photo from down the street or across the globe until it arrives at your doorstep.

Learn more at The Print Swap website, and be sure to follow along at @theprintswap on Instagram for updates and new opportunities.

Tag your best photos now with #theprintswap to be in with a chance of winning the ‘dream photography’ assignment and be considered for The Other Art Fair Sydney.

A Photographic Duet of Flesh & Spirit, Earth & Animal

© Antoine D’agata

© Emmanuel Monzon

Consider our propensity for seeing duality everywhere we go, on a quest to reduce the dialectic to a conversation centered in an “either/or” proposition as though half is greater than the whole. One of the primary flaws of binary thought is the way it triggers a hierarchical impulse that is patently false. It is neither “either/or” but “and” — the perception of the holistic nature of the universe.

On the whole, this takes more effort to assert, to swim against tides that define our radically polarized times. Sometimes it’s less an effort and more a response to what already exists. For French photographers Antoine D’agata and Emmanuel Monzon, this dynamic revealed itself in the exhibition of their work by Charbon Space in Fine Art Asia 2018.

In the photographs of Antoine D’Agata, the very fabric of the flesh becomes a radiant field of energy, at once murky and diaphanous as though we might dissolve and disintegrate into our spiritual essence for a taste of eternity. In D’agata, we feel an insistent intensity, the impassioned whisper of a wordless truth that knows that pain and pleasure exist like the ouroburo, a snake eating its tail.

A Polar Expedition to the Very Last Frontier, in Photos

Yamal Peninsula April 2018 © Yuri Kozyrev / NOOR pour la Fondation Carmignac. The Arctic Gate terminal is located in the Gulf of Ob, near Cape Kamenny (Russia). The first oil barrel was shipped out from the terminal in 2014, and winter out-shipments started in 2015. It was launched as part of the Novy Port oil field development.

Point Hope, Alaska, Arctic, May 2018 © Kadir van Lohuizen / NOOR for Fondation Carmignac.  A whale hunter is on the outlook to track Bowhead whales. The Point Hope native community can catch 10 bowheads a year.

We might wish to bury our heads in the sand as the forces of climate change push the survival of the planet towards the precipice, comforted by a faith that ignorance can protect us from all that we sow — either unable to accept reality or overwhelmed by the fact that these changes are now unstoppable, and we are ill-prepared to meet the challenges they bring. The fate of the planet lies in the hands of those who set policy — but often we don’t see what is happening until it is much too late. Enter photojournalists Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir van Lohuizen.

As recipients of the ninth annual Carmignac Photojournalism Award, which supports the production of photographic reportage on subjects concerning environmental and human rights issues around the world, Yuri Kozyrev and Kadir Van Lohuizen went to the end of the earth to document the last frontier — and the devastation being reaped in the name of “progress” and “civilization.”

The results of their work can be seen in Arctic : New Frontier – A Double Polar Expedition, on view at Cité des sciences et de l’industrie in Paris through December 9, 2018 – revealing the devastating, irreversible effects of climate change on the ice caps, as a direct result of the impact of large-scale industrialization and militarization. A book of the same name has just been co-published by Reliefs and Fondation Carmignac. 

Stirring Photos of Animals in the Aftermath of Hurricane Florence

Pigs who survived the hurricane and escaped their farm swim through flood waters in North Carolina. © Kelly Guerin / We Animals

Drowned body of a broiler chicken on a porch in North Carolina. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

Cows who survived the hurricane, stranded on a porch, surrounded by flood waters in North Carolina. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

When the filmmaker Kelly Guerin was on the ground in Duplin County, North Carolina, in the wake of Hurricane Florence, she encountered a group of pigs stranded on a highway bridge. It was already getting dark, but she and local activists Daniel Turbert and Caroline Byrd couldn’t leave the pigs behind. After coordinating with local sanctuaries, Guerin and Turbert stayed with the animals all night, counting them, checking that they were still breathing, and waiting for their rescue. Many of the pigs in the area had never seen the outdoors before Florence; raised for meat, they had spent their lives confined to factory farms, and when the hurricane came, they were been taken by the water.

Dreamy Pictures of Life on the Seashore

All That Is Above Me and Nothing That Is Below

Endless Season

“When I’m on the beach and faced with the blue horizon, wide-open sky, and a miles-long expanse of sand, sometimes my mind starts racing,” the Seattle-based photographer and digital artist Tony Nahra tells me. “Usually, I’m looking for a figure in a minimalist scene… on the sand, in the waves, or on a dune.” His images are an ode to the sea, its benevolent and violent whims, and the sense of solitude we find on its shores.

A Portrait of the Amazon on the Brink of Catastrophic Change

March 29, 2014. A group of boys climb a tree on the Xingu River by the city of Altamira, Para State, Brazil. Major areas of the city have been permanently flooded by the construction of the nearby Belo Monte Dam Complex displacing over 20,000 people while impacting numerous indigenous and riverine communities in the region.

November 26, 2014. Members of the Munduruku indigenous tribe walk on a sandbar on the Tapajos River as they prepare for a protest against plans to construct a series of hydroelectric dams on their river in Para State, Brazil. The tribe members used the rocks to write ‘Tapajos Livre’ (Free Tapajos) in a large message in the sand in an action in coordination with Greenpeace. After years of fighting, in 2016 the Munduruku were successful in lobbying the government to officially recognize their traditional territory with a demarcation. This recognition forced IBAMA, Brazil’s Environmental Agency, to suspend the environmental licensing process for the 12,000 megawatt Tapajós hydroelectric complex, due to the unconstitutional flooding of their now recognized land.

The mouth of the mighty Amazon River lies in the state of Pará, Brazil, which has been home to the people of the rainforest for over 5,000 years. During the 1960s, the government created the nation’s very first Indigenous Park, which was, at that time, the largest preserve in the world.

Home to 14 tribes that survive off the land, Xingu Indigenous Park became the site of controversy when the government began to develop plans for the Belo Monte Dam Complex on the Xingu River in 1975. In 1989, the Kayapo, a warrior tribe, mounted a massive campaign in opposition to the construction. International financers pulled out, and the project was shelved until 2007, when President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva announced the Accelerated Growth Program.

Positioned at the forefront of construction of more than 60 major hydroelectric project in the Amazon over the next 15 years, Belo Monte is poised to become the fourth largest dam in the world — displacing up to 40,000 people living in the park while destroying the complex ecosystems in order to fuel continued mining of the rainforest.

In his series, Where the River Runs Through, which was chosen for the Critical Mass Top 50, photographer Aaron Vincent Elkaim presents Where the River Runs Through, a profound portrait of the people and the landscape at the precipice of a massive change whose impact on the indigenous communities and the environment are devastating. Elkaim shares his insights into the impact of industry on the earth.

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