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Posts tagged: landscape photography

Otherworldly Photos from the World’s Largest Salt Flat

Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni, the planet’s largest salt flat, will literally take your breath away. “The air is crystal clear but very thin, which makes it hard to breathe,” the Berlin-based photographer Navina Khatib tells me. “You always have a taste of salt on your lips, and in some places there is a strong smell of sulfur. There is a profound silence, and the colors shine very bright.” Her photographs from Uyuni reflect that sense of breathlessness; instead of recording the reality of the landscape, she captures the sensations of being there, in the middle of nowhere, more than 3600 meters above sea level.

One Photographer Reflects on the Mysteries of the Human Body

When the gallerist Giles Huxley-Parlour discusses the work of Jocelyn Lee, he doesn’t talk about seeing the work “in person.” Instead, he uses the phrase “in the flesh.” When the poet Sharon Olds writes about Lee’s photographs, she uses the same word, asking, “What is this flesh, anyway?!” And when Lee describes her own images, she tends to use the word “naked” instead of “nude.” The Appearance of Things, created over the course of about a decade, is her exploration of our bodies, their strength, and their fragility.

Enter the ‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest Now for a Chance at $15,000

Image: The Great Chamber © David Swindler

Flamingos in Flight © Aya Okawa, Grand Prize Winner

Bison March © Kaely Carmean, Second Prize Winner

In the winter of last year, the San Francisco-based photographer and visual anthropologist Aya Okawa took a flight over Andalusia. She’s traveled to this marshland numerous times, capturing breathtaking aerial views, but this trip was different; as the sun dipped below the horizon, a flock of flamingos took off into the air. Okawa preserved that exact moment in her photograph Flamingos in Flight.

The incredible image would become the $15,000 Grand Prize Winner of the 2017 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest. Organized by The Weather Channel in partnership with Toyota, this contest honors imagery that speaks to the power and beauty of our planet and our place within it.

Mysterious Photos from the Stunning Landscapes of Norway

Trolltyg i tomteskogen

Hunting Trolls

“I have always been drawn to a darker, mysterious, and melancholic side,” the Norwegian photographer Sebastian Dijkstra Nilander tells me. “In music, I prefer songs in minor keys, and I read mostly thrillers and horror books.” His fascination with the shadows began in childhood; he spent his early years watching films like Labyrinth, The NeverEnding Story, The Lost BoysThe Goonies, and others. And it’s continued throughout his adult life; now a father himself, Nilander spends evenings and early mornings exploring the woods close to home in Lier.

A Moment of Contemplation & Serenity During Arles

Hills at dawn, Namo Buddha, Nepal Dec, 2017

Salinas Grandes, district de Juyjuy, Argentine, Mai 2015

On the banks of the Rhône River, the rapidly developing district of Trinquetaille, Colombian architects Simón Vélez and Stefana Simic have designed a monumental pavilion that overlooks the Old City of Arles. Made of bamboo, the thousand-square meter structure is home to Contemplation, an installation featuring the black and white photographs of Mattiheu Ricard, a Buddhist monk, scientist, and author who has been living alongside Tibetan masters in the heart of the Himalayas for over forty years.

Contemplation features 40 photos made between 1983 and 2017, made in Nepal, India, Argentina Chile, Bhutan, and Tibet bear witness to Ricard’s devotion to spiritual practice in all its forms. The photographs are printed on traditional Japanese Awagami paper, whose production dates back some 1,400 years. The 2m x 1.5m prints are accompanied by music designed to evoke a sense of serenity, a place for restoration and rest, during the middle of Les Rencontres de la Photographie in Arles, July 3 – September 23, 2018.

One Photographer’s Love Letter to the Horses of Iceland

“Sleipnir is one of the most famous Icelandic horses,” the photographer Drew Doggett tells me. “He is believed to be the god Odin’s spirit animal, and according to folklore, the horseshoe-shaped glacial canyon Asbyrgi was formed by Sleipnir’s footprint.” In the Poetic Edda, Sleipnir carries Odin into the world of the dead. The author of the Prose Edda tells us he had eight legs. He was the son of a stallion and the Norse god Loki, and his real-world brothers and sisters, descendants of the horses brought over by the Norse people, still roam the enchanted landscape of Iceland today. They served as muses for Doggett’s most recent project In the Realm of Legends.

The Young & Passionate Surfers of Liberia, in Photos

“As soon as the morning light hits, you’ll see them making their way through the sand until the sun sets in the horizon,” the Aba, Nigeria-born photographer Yagazie Emezi says of the surfers of Robertsport in Western Liberia. “It’s a serious passion for them, living and breathing. It’s unrelenting.” A Young Thing is her testament to the surfers, the littlest of whom are eight to twelve years old.

A Spiritual Journey Exploring the Magnificence of Trees

Lake Tree, Beihai Park, Beijing, China, 2008

Bamboo and Tree, Qingkou Village, Yunnan, China, 2013

Huangshan Mountains, Study 13, Anhui, China, 2008

As a young boy growing up in the town of Widnes in northwest England, photographer Michael Kenna discovered a tree at the edge of a field in Victoria Park and made it his own. He and his brothers staked out their respective arboreal homes, hidden from the world, they could escape into the limitless expanses of their imaginations. Those trees became sanctuaries from all that civilization demanded of them, allowing them a space to commune with nature, free and unfettered.

Over the past 35 years, Kenna has dedicated himself to photographing trees all around the globe. Using a Hasselblad to create exquisite black and white silver gelatin prints, Kenna’s portraits of trees are like Zen koans: tranquil and enchanting, minimal and moody, and powerfully evocative of life’s deepest mysteries.

A selection of these works is on view in Philosopher’s Tree’ by Michael Kenna at Blue Lotus Gallery, Hong Kong, from June 15 through July 1, 2018. The works take us around the world, into different realms where trees have their own unique relationship with the landscape and the environment. Whether in China or Italy, Norway or Brazil, Kenna’s relationship to the trees is an unwavering act of devotion.

These Photos of the South Island Are Straight from a Dream

During the two weeks he spent camping through New Zealand’s South Island, the Oakland photographer Paul Hoi heard the sound of a glacier breaking. He watched the sunset from Rocky Mountain, without another soul in sight. Along the way, he encountered wild rabbits and kea birds, elk and alpaca. He spotted goats on his way back to camp. He saw waterfalls emerge from curtains of mist. “The two solitary weeks on those roads were two of the best weeks of my life,” he tells me. “But it’s important to me to push all my work into the fringe of the otherworldly.” For that reason, he chose not to record his journey but to reimagine it in infrared with help from a modified mirrorless camera with specialized filters.

Sally Mann Looks Back on Life in the American South

Sally Mann. Bean’s Bottom, 1991.
Silver dye bleach print, 49.5 × 49.5 cm (19 1/2 × 19 1/2 in.)
Private collection. © Sally Mann

Sally Mann. Was Ever Love, 2009>
Gelatin silver print, 38.1 × 34.3 cm (15 × 13 1/2 in.).
The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Museum purchase funded by the
S.I. Morris Photography Endowment, 2010.163. Image © Sally Mann

“The past is never dead. It’s not even past,” William Faulkner wrote in the 1951 novel Requiem for a Nun. He understood the ways in which history is ever present to the point in which it casts a long shadow over our daily lives. It lingers and mingles until it dyes the color of our thoughts, camouflaging itself by hiding in plain sight.

Faulkner understood the nature of the American South, a land shrouded in myth and mystique, nestled in layers of illusion and untold histories. For the novelist, the South was not so much a place as it was an “emotional idea,” one that could be mined endlessly for stories that evoke the truth about who we were – and who we are.

American photographer Sally Mann shares this knowledge of the South. A native Virginia born in a hospital that had once been Stonewall Jackson’s home, Mann’s work is infused with mix of romantic and Gothic sensibilities that underscore her southern roots. In every image there is a sense of a past so profound that it pulls the present backwards until the very sense of when these images were made melts away.

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