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Posts tagged: landscape photography

Eerie, Dreamlike Moments Made on Light-Sensitive Paper

Vanessa Marsh still remembers the night at sleep-away camp when she learned the truth about the night sky: once starlight reached the earth, it had already traveled trillions of miles. For this reason, a counselor told her, the twinkles she saw at night were already old— sometimes even hundreds or thousands of years old. The star itself could have died before she was born.

Never-Before-Published Ryan McGinley Photos

© Ryan McGinley

When Ryan McGinley was a kid, one of his favorite books was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. “I love Mark Twain and I love that adventurous spirit of getting into trouble,” he recently told Kathy Ryan. It’s a perfect line from a photographer famous for his wandering feet, group road trips, and out-of-the-way locations.

In collaboration with WeTransfer, the New York Times Magazine Photography Director combed through the archives of the legendary American photographer to curate a digital gallery of fifteen previously unpublished images. The photographs and their conversation were just released on WeTransfer.

A Quintessential Road Trip In Search of ‘America’

The United States is built on myth, dating back to the earliest days of the republic, when Thomas Jefferson wrote, “All men are created equal,” without any self-awareness. A slaveholder claiming equality — what kind of world could spawn such profoundly pathological cognitive dissonance?

It is “self-evident” as Jefferson would say: one that considered itself “enlightened” enough to use reason and logic to uphold irrational beliefs; to craft holidays like “Thanksgiving” that celebrated the wholesale slaughter of Native Americans and whitewash history; to name cities, towns, and counties after Christopher Columbus, the architect of the Transatlantic Slave Trade — to do all these things and play innocent.

The myth of “America” has appealed for hundreds of years. “Give me your tired, your poor, / Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, / The wretched refuse of your teeming shore” wrote poet Emma Lazarus, whose words were placed on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty in 1903. “Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me.”

See 40 Landscapes from The Print Swap at Black Eye Gallery

‘Ella as Dorothy’ © Cathy Ronalds (@cathyronalds), Victoria, Australia

‘Búðakirkja (Black church). Búðir, Iceland. November 2016.’ © Brian S. Lee (@brianslee_), Atlanta, GA

‘Dogs of Teotihuacán’ © Michelle Lorén (@fotoinfinitum), Pomona, CA

Since Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a worldwide project for photographers who want to share their work with one another, we’ve had repeated requests for exhibitions. This fall, The Print Swap is proud to present Ambient Landscapes at Black Eye Gallery in Sydney, Australia.

Mysterious Photos Inspire Us to Get Lost At Sea

Your Braid, 2006 © Dan Estabrook

Mesmory, 2010 © Lisa M. Robinson

Ribboned Water, 2015 © Diana H. Bloomfield

The pictures in At Sea, now on view at Panopticon Gallery in Boston, leave us feeling adrift. The ocean is endless, and when people do appear, they don’t look real.

The Grace & Magic of Rural Living, in Photos

Electric Current © Andrew Heiser, Los Angeles, CA

German Pastoral Study #1, from the series Divine Animals: The Bovidae © R. J. Kern, Minneapolis, MN

Dinner Time © Michael Knapstein, Middleton, Wisconsin

Last summer, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a worldwide project for photographers. Here’s how it works: you can submit by tagging your photos #theprintswap. Every day, we curate submissions, and we notify photographers who have been selected. It’s free to submit, but winners pay a one-time fee of $40 per image. We cover shipping and printing, which is done by our friends at Skink Ink in Brooklyn, New York. Prints are then mailed out randomly across the globe, and every participating photographer receives a surprise print from one of their peers.

In recent weeks, we’ve been looking over The Print Swap archive and putting together online group shows with the pictures in the collection. In the past, we’ve explored themes like New Topographics, Seascapes, and the American West. Here, a collection of some of our favorite photographs of life in rural places.

Lee Deigaard Photographs the Backs of Horses as Landscapes

Lee Deigaard

Lee Deigaard

I had featured the work of New Orleans artist Lee Deigaard a few years ago, and I was so excited when I learned she’d be at the Living With Animals conference at Eastern Kentucky University in March so we could finally meet. I love the photographs in her series Equuleus (“part of a multi-media long-term project, In Your Dreams [Horses], exploring horse personality and individuality, sensory processing and proprioception, concepts of invitation, initiation, and trespass, and shared thresholds of experience between horse and human”) for their playful concept, their surreal, otherworldly quality, and the series’ thoughtful, poetic statement.

Ordinary Scenes from the Extra-Terrestrial Landscape of the American Southwest

Serge J-F. Levy

Serge J-F. Levy

In his series The Fire in the Freezer, Tucson, Arizona artist Serge J-F. Levy documents “the small happenings of life and the ordinary scenes in the extra-terrestrial landscape of the American Southwest.” The project, which was awarded special recognition by the Dorothea Lange–Paul Taylor Prize from the Center for Documentary Studies at Duke University in 2015, moves beyond documentary or landscape photography to describe the artist’s shift from life in New York City to the Sonoran Desert, from black and white street photography to color images that focus on scenes in nature, and from one “place” in life to another.

65 Photos from The Print Swap Are Coming to Photoville!

‘A Broken Pulsar’ © Fili Olsefski, Athens, Greece

‘Down by the Station’ © Steffen Tuck, Brisbane, Australia

‘Havana by Night’ © Eric Hsu, New York, NY

Last year, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a way to connect photographers around the world. The rules are simple: anyone can submit by using the hashtag #theprintswap on Instagram. If your image is selected, it’s printed by the experts at Skink Ink in Brooklyn before being mailed across the world and landing on the doorstep of another winner. Every winning photographer gives a print, and every winning photographer receives a print too. Pieces are mailed out randomly, so it’s always a fun surprise to see who ends up with which print.

Since its inception, The Print Swap has received more than 45,000 submissions. Curators Alison Zavos and Julia Sabot have selected more than 2,500 winning images. Over the past two months, they’ve also considered all incoming submissions and handpicked 65 of them to show at the first ever Print Swap exhibition, opening in September at Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photoville, the largest annual photography event in New York City and, will include 70+ exhibitions this year, all installed in repurposed shipping containers-turned-galleries.

This is truly an international exhibition. Zavos and Sabot chose pictures from photographers working in twenty countries around the world. But more than that, this collection represents a wide range of practices, genres, and methods. There’s film; there’s digital. There’s classic black and white and vibrant, artificial color.

These photographers find reverence, dignity, and whimsy in humans and animals alike. Jake Green photographs Sonja Usher, an actor playing the role of the Archbishop of Canterbury in a production of Shakespeare’s Henry V. Kristen Bartley introduces us to Picasso, a dog whose name presumably comes from the slightly off-kilter structure of his face. Even uninhabited places, like Steffen Tuck’s Australian subway station or Bonita Chan’s reflected Hong Kong carousel, seem to thrum with life.

For all the beauty, there are also echoes of urgency and loss that color and illuminate corners of this exhibition. Aleksandra Dynas meets children living in the streets of Uganda, where over ten thousand young people go without food, shelter, education and medical care. Many work in demolition and do jobs on trucks, and the littlest ones collect metal and plastic. Yusni Aziz encounters a young resident of the Kampung Akuarium in Jakarta sitting in his “dream house,” a thoughtfully designed and decorated fisherman’s boat, after families in the area were evicted and their homes were razed to the ground.

Here, you’ll find all the participating photographers showing work at The Print Swap exhibition at Photoville. We hope you’ll visit in person between September 13-24, 2017. After all, these prints were meant to be seen in real life, hanging on a wall. As always, The Print Swap is open for submissions. Find more details on our website, and check in at @theprintswap on Instagram, where we regularly share winning images. Thank you to everyone to submitted work this time around. We love seeing your images.

Enter The 2017 PhotogrVphy Grant for a Chance at $1000

Images © Drew Nikonowicz, Elena Anosova, Matt Hamon

PhotogrVphy Magazine established the annual $1000 PhotogrVphy Grant to support photographers working across genres around the world. Every year, they welcome an international jury of editors, curators, publishers, agents, gallerists, academics to select winners who fit into five broad but distinct categories. This year’s categories are Architecture, Conceptual, Nature, Photojournalism, and Culture.

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