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Posts tagged: landscape photography

20 Beautiful, Uncommon Photos of Flowers

The floral forest of dreams © Dina Shirin (@dinashirin), Bronx, NY

Rhapsody © Katharina Will, Düsseldorf, Germany

The Print Swap is a submissions-based project by Feature Shoot connecting thousands of photographers all over the world. Here’s how it works: any and all images can be submitted via Instagram using the hashtag #myfeatureshoot. Outstanding photographs are selected for the swap, and participating photographers give and receive prints. Prints are mailed out internationally and randomly, so part of the excitement is that it’s always a surprise. You never know what print you’ll get until the day it arrives.

Over the last few months, we’ve been highlighting some of the extraordinary images from The Print Swap by featuring them in online group shows, each with a different theme. This time, we drew inspiration from the likes of Robert Mapplethorpe, Edward Weston, and Imogen Cunningham and focused on a single subject: flowers. After combing through The Print Swap collection in search of sunflowers, roses, tulips, and daisies, we plucked out some of our favorite blossoms to share with you.

In photographs, flowers can be metaphors–for love, loss, or rebirth. My Heart’s Desire by Mark Reynolds is part of the artist’s Funeral Flower Series. In Meredith Andrew’s work, plucked flowers are the last remaining vestige of a season gone by. In Dina Shirin’s picture, the silhouette of a woman explores an alternate realm, defined only by the vague shape of a flower. Still, flowers don’t always have to be symbols of larger themes. Sometimes flowers are simply flowers, and their beauty is more than enough. Jules Hebert regularly photographs the rotating cast of flowers on display in his New York lobby.

This Valentine’s Day, enjoy a collection of flowers, and feel free to peruse The Print Swap Instagram feed for more inspiring imagery. Photographers are welcome to submit images to The Print Swap by tagging them #theprintswap on Instagram. We also accept submissions emailed to [email protected] New images submitted between now and March 23rd will be considered not only for The Print Swap but also for our upcoming Print Swap exhibition, happening at BERLIN BLUE art. Learn more about the show here.

Childhood, Loss, and Redemption in the Photos of Cig Harvey

In her third and latest book, the photographer Cig Harvey remembers studying art history at the age of eighteen. She attends class two days a week, and she’s so bored, she falls asleep at her desk. “It’s all just so beige,” she writes. You An Orchestra You A Bomb is a rebellion against the tedium, a frenzied, color-fueled exploration of the everyday, and an antidote to sleep.

Harry Gruyaert’s Photos Take Us On a Colorful Journey from Vegas to the USSR

 

Las Vegas downtown motel, Las Vegas, Nevada, United States, 1982.
© Harry Gruyaert Magnum Photos

Moscow, Russia, 1989.
© Harry Gruyaert Magnum Photos

“Higher emotions cannot be communicated in color,” American photographer Paul Strand claimed – revealing the power of irrational beliefs to take root in the mind and spread like a virus through those who fear to question ideology in search of the truth.

The decision to invite Belgian photographer Harry Gruyaert (b. 1941) to join Magnum Photos in 1982 caused dissent among the ranks. At that time Gruyaert had been working in color for two decades, but the powers that be “didn’t see color,” so to speak. Photography was still a fledgling medium in the art world, and those who were desperate to join the ranks revealed a powerful insecurity that fed simple-minded biases and false hierarchies designed to exclude innovative thinkers who worked outside the narrow frame of the status quo.

Gruyaert, however, was undeterred. His commitment remained consistent throughout his remarkable career. In 1981, Geo photo editor Alice Rose George commissioned Gruyaert to photograph Las Vegas. Rather than provide his take on the tired tropes of the Strip, Gruyaert ventured off the beaten path ton the Vegas where residents lived. The result was entirely too realistic; Vegas was not the place of fantasies and spectacle – it was a world where people eked out their existence on the margins.

Timeless Photos of the American Midwest

Somewhere near Stoughton, Wisconsin, there’s a white townhouse on top of a hill. It’s alone up there, surrounded by sky. Years ago, it survived a tornado that ravaged much of the landscape. Middleton photographer Michael Knapstein doesn’t know who lives in the house, and that’s alright with him. “I can picture what the owners look like, even though I have never met them,” he tells me.

Alec Soth’s Iconic ‘Sleeping by the Mississippi’ 13 Years Later



Alec Soth, ‘Peter’s houseboat, Winona, Minnesota’ from Sleeping by the Mississippi (2017). Courtesy of the artist and MACK

Alec Soth, ‘Maiden Rock, Wisconsin’ from Sleeping by the Mississippi (2017). Courtesy of the artist and MACK.

“Over and over again I fall asleep with my eyes open, knowing I’m falling asleep, unable to prevent it. When I fall asleep this way, my eyes are cut off from my ordinary mind as though they were shut, but they become directly connected to this new, extraordinary mind which grows increasingly competent to deal with their impressions.” -Charles Lindbergh, aviator (epitaph to Alec Soth’s Sleeping by the Mississippi)

“I live near the beginning of the Mississippi and have always felt a pull to it,” Soth tells writer Colin Pantall of the British Journal of Photography. “I used to run away when I was 5 or 6, pack a suitcase with books and run away from home. I’d only get a few blocks but it was the whole Huck Finn process, where the north is home and the south symbolises the exotic.”

Photos of the Vending Machines That Illuminate Japan at Night

If one of Eiji Ohashi’s friends spots a vending machine is some obscure, out-of-the-way spot in Japan, they tell him about it. The Hokkaido photographer has been chasing the machines for nine years now, venturing out on the coldest winter nights to see them glittering against their sleepy surroundings. Roadside Lights, now on view at the &co119 gallery in Paris, is the result of his adventures.

A Photographer’s Strange and Beautiful Ode to His Daughter

Amsterdam photographer Caspar Claasen, like all parents, dreads the day his child will have to live without him. Four years ago, when his daughter Lora was four years old, the fear took over, causing acute bouts of panic. Intrusive thoughts and anxiety-inducing images flooded his brain. He worried about car accidents and ill-fated falls. Throughout this period, Claasen also photographed Lora, watched her grow up, and raised her one day at a time.

Claasen is now raising funds for his new book, Even Firemen, an ode to his daughter and the demons she unknowingly helped him to overcome. Composed of photographs of a solitary Lora exploring ordinary places turned surreal by her father’s gaze, the book marks the close of a painful but vital chapter in the photographer’s life. He describes the scenes in its pages as “the moments between moments.”

Eerie, Dreamlike Moments Made on Light-Sensitive Paper

Vanessa Marsh still remembers the night at sleep-away camp when she learned the truth about the night sky: once starlight reached the earth, it had already traveled trillions of miles. For this reason, a counselor told her, the twinkles she saw at night were already old— sometimes even hundreds or thousands of years old. The star itself could have died before she was born.

Never-Before-Published Ryan McGinley Photos

© Ryan McGinley

When Ryan McGinley was a kid, one of his favorite books was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. “I love Mark Twain and I love that adventurous spirit of getting into trouble,” he recently told Kathy Ryan. It’s a perfect line from a photographer famous for his wandering feet, group road trips, and out-of-the-way locations.

In collaboration with WeTransfer, the New York Times Magazine Photography Director combed through the archives of the legendary American photographer to curate a digital gallery of fifteen previously unpublished images. The photographs and their conversation were just released on WeTransfer.

A Quintessential Road Trip In Search of ‘America’

The United States is built on myth, dating back to the earliest days of the republic, when Thomas Jefferson wrote, “All men are created equal,” without any self-awareness. A slaveholder claiming equality — what kind of world could spawn such profoundly pathological cognitive dissonance?

It is “self-evident” as Jefferson would say: one that considered itself “enlightened” enough to use reason and logic to uphold irrational beliefs; to craft holidays like “Thanksgiving” that celebrated the wholesale slaughter of Native Americans and whitewash history; to name cities, towns, and counties after Christopher Columbus, the architect of the Transatlantic Slave Trade — to do all these things and play innocent.

The myth of “America” has appealed for hundreds of years. “Give me your tired, your poor, / Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free, / The wretched refuse of your teeming shore” wrote poet Emma Lazarus, whose words were placed on the pedestal of the Statue of Liberty in 1903. “Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me.”

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