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Posts tagged: animal photography

Tragic Images Aim to Raise Awareness About Bird Fatalities

Lynne Parks

Lynne Parks

The photography of Baltimore-based Lynne Parks depicts migratory birds that have had fatal collisions with buildings. Parks’ photos bring attention to the results of building design that is antithetical to one of nature’s great movements, migration patterns.

Baby Wild Boar in the Snow

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© Fotofeeling / Westend61 / Offset

To see more of Fotofeeling’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

10 Devastatingly Beautiful Photographs from Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

Michael_Nichols

The last great picture Nick set out to create an archetypal image that would express both the essence of lions and how we visualize them – a picture of a time past, before lions were under such threat. Here, the five females of the Vumbi pride – a ‘formidable and spectacularly cooperative team’ – lie at rest with their cubs on a kopje (a rocky outcrop), in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. Nick got to know and love the Vumbi pride. A few months later, he heard that it had ventured into land beyond the park and that three females had been killed. © Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

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The price they pay A teenager from a village in southern Tunisia offers to sell a three-month-old fennec fox, one of a litter of pups he dug out of their den in the Sahara Desert. Catching or killing wild fennec foxes is illegal in Tunisia but widespread. Bruno discovered widespread wildlife exploitation, including hunting and capture for commercial trade and traditional medicine. He also discovered that the causes and therefore the solutions are complex and include high unemployment, poor education, lack of enforcement of conservation laws, ignorant tourists and tour companies, habitat destruction and the socio-political legacy of the ‘Arab Spring’ revolts. But Bruno is convinced that change is possible – that tourism has a part to play and that thought-provoking images can help raise awareness among tourists as well as highlight what’s happening to the fragile Sahara Desert environment. © Bruno D’Amicis / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

As our human race continues to encroach upon and threaten the natural world that surrounds us, few genres carry as much weight as wildlife photography, and for 50 years, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition at London’s Natural History Museum has maintained its position as a leading international platform for imagery that transforms and enriches our perceptions of those creatures with whom we share our planet.

New Documentary Shows the Annual Herding of Icelandic Wild Horses Across Incredibly Scenic Terrain

Lindsay Blatt

Lindsay Blatt

Herd in Iceland is a documentary film about the annual round-up of the Icelandic horse, isolated for centuries by the country’s oceanic borders. The film, directed by New York photo editor, photographer, and filmmaker Lindsay Blatt, is accompanied by a photo essay. Both sets of visuals provide a beautiful look into this amazing tradition and focus on the stories of the people as well as the animals.

Sad Puppy

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© Galeries / Offset

To see more of Galeries’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

Idyllic Photos of a Shepherd’s Everyday Life

Marco Sgarbi

Marco Sgarbi

When I first contacted Marco Sgarbi, he let me know that he is not a photographer, but a shepherd. An Italian trained as an architect, Sgarbi left the field as it was not “good for the soul,” lamenting that in his work he destroyed places “to build non-places.” A beautiful sentiment coming from someone who felt a calling and followed through to return to the land.

Baby Elephant at Sunset

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© Jason Edwards / National Geographic / Offset

To see more of Jason Edwards’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

Heartwarming Portraits of Extremely Old Dogs

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“Benjamin was found as a stray and ended up in a shelter about a year and a half ago. Pugalug Pug Rescue took him in and we were his foster parents. Due to his age and his medical problems, Ben was put in the ‘Abode Program'; he would be a long term foster. We thought it was important that he have a forever family so we adopted him; we are foster failures (again). He is estimated to be about 14 years old.”

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“Finnegan is a Brussels Griffon smooth coat or a Petit Brabançon. He is 12.5 years old. When he lived in Montreal, he went by his French name: Finni le Poo.”

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“Meet Stella the 12-year-old, one-eyed wonder Chihuahua! The little head tilt gives this tough girl a bit of deserved attitude.”

For Old Faithful, Toronto-based photographer Pete Thorne captures the time-worn faces of elderly dogs, inviting the canines to sit for him in his home studio and sometimes making special trips to visit those who, in their old age, are unable to make the journey.

Exclusive Interview with ‘The Cut’ Photo Editor Emily Shornick About Online Editing and Her Quirky Collection of Offset Imagery

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© The Licensing Project / Offset

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© The Licensing Project / Offset

The Cut is a division of New York Magazine devoted entirely to female-driven content, covering everything from breaking fashion news to complex explorations of contemporary women’s issues. In addition to keeping its millions of readers appraised of the latest celebrity gossip and most engaging political debates, The Cut has helped define the voice of the Millennial Generation, generating viral content that speaks to a diverse group of 20-something women. The Cut seamlessly merges the sex and relationship advice of Cosmopolitan, the fashion of Vogue, and the stimulating content of Ms. Magazine, securing its position as a leading daily resource for women.

Photo du Jour: A Tale of Two Baby Squirrels

Tytia_Habing

In early September of this year, I discovered a baby squirrel on the side of the road. With unopened eyes and just a downy layer of fur, she was unable to fend for herself. I picked her up and carried her in my hands to the nearest vet’s office, her small snout burrowing into my skin in search of food.