Posts tagged: animal photography

3 Photographers on What It’s Like to Work (and Sell Images) with ImageBrief (Sponsored)


Emily Wilson

“I like working with people who genuinely want me to succeed,” says portrait photographer Emily Wilson—who has worked with such clients as The New York Times, Grey Advertising, and The Globe and Mail—of her decision to join ImageBrief, a platform that directly connects brands, advertising agencies, and other buyers who are looking for specific content with photographers who are perfect for the job. Like so many others on ImageBrief, she’s found the support she needs to further build her already impressive network of top clients, including Reebok, whose executives hired her on assignment after seeing some images she’d uploaded to her profile.

Hard-Hitting Images Examine the Complex Relationship Between Asians and Elephants

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A tear rolls the cheek of a distressed elephant as his spirit is broken after three days of imprisonment in a wooded crush on the Thai- Burma border

Hand of a Mahout as he leeds this your elephant in Western Thailand

Hand of a Mahout as he leeds an elephant in Western Thailand

“In Asia, we haven’t quite figured out whether we love these animals or hate them,” says Madras-born, Hong Kong-based photographer Palani Mohan of the elephants he spent over five years documenting. Vanishing Giants is his testimony of the ways in which mankind both cherishes and does violence to the Asian elephants that live amongst humans in villages and cities alike.

Touching Portraits of Dogs Taken Years Apart, from Puppyhood to Old Age


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Lily, 15 years

Although Massachusetts-based portrait photographer Amanda Jones has been working with dogs for two decades, the first canine she could call her own was a longhaired Dachshund named Lily. As Jones’s first-born, Lily was there for it all— various relocations, the arrival of the photographer’s human baby— until she passed away after sixteen years of friendship. Lily, says the photographer, was the companion who ultimately led her to create Dog Years, a book for which she captured dogs in mirrored photographs of their youth and old age, taken years apart.

Portraits Capture the Humanity of Primates



As the single male gorilla amongst five females housed together at the Berlin Zoo, Ivo the silverback familiar to many throughout Europe for his rare and curious response to the throngs of visitors that pass by his run. The twenty-something-year-old animal has yet to find a mate and spends much of his days colliding with and hammering upon the glass that separates him from spectators. Sometimes, he’ll simply gather toss rocks at the crowd until they disperse in fear. Meeting Ivo, says Warsaw-based photographer Pawel Bogumil, marked the beginning of what would become inHUMAN, a series that has lead him to conclude that although they may not be human, apes are— in the most essential sense— people.

Intense Portraits Show Reptiles and Insects Interacting with the Human Body




For Penumbrae, Dutch photographer Juul Kraijer collaborates with her longtime muse, a young French woman who chooses to remain unnamed, to build human-animal hybrids that incorporate a bestiary of terrestrial and avian creatures.

The Story of Former Mexican Gang Members Who Now Pursue Their Passion for Art and Tattooing



In the desert landscape of Indio, California, eight young men cast off their involvements within the Mexican gang system in hopes of forging non-violent lives as a brotherhood of tattoo artists. For Desert Ink, Australian photographer Jonathan May tells the story of the men of Art and Ink tattoo shop, weaving together a murky and enigmatical tale of loss and redemption.

The Weather Channel and Toyota’s ‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest Is Offering the Chance to Win $15,000 and Other Prizes


If there’s one thing that photographers will never be able to control, it’s the weather. No matter how advanced cameras become or how much the industry changes course, Mother Nature will remain a constant, and she will always have the upper hand. When photographers are faced with unusual weather, they have two choices: to resign and go back home, or to embrace the unpredictability and power of our planet. This year, The Weather Channel’s annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest celebrates those who have chosen the latter and gone on to make unforgettable images relating to the themes of nature, adventure, and the elements.

Photographer Gains Once-in-a-Lifetime Access to the Festival of Niger’s Nomadic Tribes




When rainfall quenches the bone-dry terrain of Southern Niger, says New York-based travel photographer Terri Gold, a thousand Wodaabe nomads, along with thousands of their treasured animals, converge across the desert in celebration of the The Guérewol Festival. As part of the weeklong event, the men dress in traditional finery, adorn their faces in paint, and perform for hours in hopes of winning the admiration of a set of young women judges. After braving the 110 degree heat in search of the merrymaking, Gold at last happened upon Guérewol after weeks of anticipation and captured the scene using infrared film.

A Story of Hope and Beauty on the Mississippi Delta




For New York City-based photographer Magdalena Sole, visiting the Mississippi Delta for the first time was like returning to a home she never knew she missed. Since then, she has spent eighty four days and traversed over 10,000 miles of land between the Mississippi and Yazoo Rivers, discovering happiness and heartache as they erupt in tandem across the Southern plains.

Photographer Traverses the Frozen Wilderness, Comes Back with Ethereal, Dreamlike Images

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For Alaskan photographer Acacia Johnson, traversing the Far North signifies a homecoming, a return to the curiosity and awe she felt as a young child for the icy wilderness. For Polaris, named for the North Star, the photographer camps and hikes across Alaska and Iceland, chasing down the elusive threads of belonging that bind her to the inhospitable terrain.