Menu

Posts tagged: animal photography

One Photographer’s Commitment to the Vulnerable Wild Horses of the United States

Wild Horse Family, Sandwash Basin, CO

Moonlit Dance

Entwined

Horses helped ease Tori Gagne‘s homesickness when she was a young girl away at summer camp. As an adult and a photographer, Gagne now sees the equine species as a kind of mirror for the pieces of ourselves we’ve lost. “Horses connect us to a deeper part of ourselves that remembers wildness, freedom, nature and open spaces,” she tells me. “They can feel your emotion and reflect it back to you, showing you your true self.” Today, she documents and advocates for the lives of wild horses in the United States.

One Photographer’s Love Letter to the Horses of Iceland

“Sleipnir is one of the most famous Icelandic horses,” the photographer Drew Doggett tells me. “He is believed to be the god Odin’s spirit animal, and according to folklore, the horseshoe-shaped glacial canyon Asbyrgi was formed by Sleipnir’s footprint.” In the Poetic Edda, Sleipnir carries Odin into the world of the dead. The author of the Prose Edda tells us he had eight legs. He was the son of a stallion and the Norse god Loki, and his real-world brothers and sisters, descendants of the horses brought over by the Norse people, still roam the enchanted landscape of Iceland today. They served as muses for Doggett’s most recent project In the Realm of Legends.

Touching Photos of Dogs With Their Favorite Things

The Stray. Marmaduke / Shar Pei Pitbull mix, 7.5 years old (Marmaduke is up for adoption at Pacific Pups Rescue!)

The Senior. Magda / Cocker Spaniel Dachschund mix, 13.3 years old

Last year, I opened an old cardboard box to discover a long-forgotten stuffed monkey that once belonged to my childhood dog. Perry passed away more than a decade ago, but the memory of his scent rushed back to me in an instant. The tattered, time-worn toy seemed to contain so much of the life of my beloved pet, regardless of how much time had elapsed. Dogs, like humans, have objects they use and cherish, and these items help define who they are. The Los Angeles photographer Alicia Rius pays tribute to this truth in her new series A DOG’S LIFE.

Toru Kasaya Photographs Hidden Beauty Near the Shore

Date:2016/11/6. Shooting place: Osezaki Shizuoka.
Scientific name: Lubricogobius exiguus. English name: Golden goby.

Date:2013/5/9. Shooting place: Hakodate Usujiri Hokkaido.
Scientific name: Sargassum horneri (Turner) C. Agard Hypoptychus dybows.
English name: Eggs of Naked sand lance with Sargassum.

Date:2015/12/1. Shooting place:Hakodate Usujiri Hokkaido.
Scientific name:Enteroctopus dofleini. English name:Giant pacific octopus.

The ocean is a place of magic and mystery, perhaps the one last frontier left on earth. Its depths have never been plumbed or mapped; the marvels they contain are rarely revealed to those who walk the land.

Japanese photographer Toru Kasaya understands this well: we need not go far off shore before we encounter the mesmerizing and beautiful. “I take my photos near populous coasts. Not many residents are aware of the bountiful life under their noses,” Kasaya reveals in his artist statement.

“Even fishermen, who make a living from the sea, are surprised when they look at my photos, saying that they had no idea marine creatures were living this way as they only see them out of the ocean.”

These Photos of the South Island Are Straight from a Dream

During the two weeks he spent camping through New Zealand’s South Island, the Oakland photographer Paul Hoi heard the sound of a glacier breaking. He watched the sunset from Rocky Mountain, without another soul in sight. Along the way, he encountered wild rabbits and kea birds, elk and alpaca. He spotted goats on his way back to camp. He saw waterfalls emerge from curtains of mist. “The two solitary weeks on those roads were two of the best weeks of my life,” he tells me. “But it’s important to me to push all my work into the fringe of the otherworldly.” For that reason, he chose not to record his journey but to reimagine it in infrared with help from a modified mirrorless camera with specialized filters.

Revealing the Traumas of America’s Class System, in Photos

Jean (Mother), 2017

Sheldon at Sixteen, 2016

The photographer John-David Richardson commutes from graduate school in Lincoln, Nebraska to his hometown in Northern Alabama each winter and summer. He makes stops in Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama, meeting people along the way. In one town, he spent a series of afternoons with a pair of teenage boys and their two puppies. They had run from home, their foster families, and the police. They hoped to make it to California. “I saw myself in those boys,” Richardson admits. “I remember feeling so lost and having so little hope that escaping was the only way to better my situation.”

The Vulnerability of Pit Bulls, in Photos

Frida, adopted

Sula, available for adoption at AZK9 Rescue

Rumple, available for adoption at Animal Haven

When the photographer Sophie Gamand first pitched her Pit Bull Flower Power book to publishers, she faced resistance. One suggested, “Nobody cares about pit bulls.” Gamand is familiar with this sentiment. Over the four years she’s spent photographing the misunderstood dogs, she’s learned some painful facts: about one million pit bull type dogs die in shelters each year because they do not find homes. Approximately one out of every six hundred is adopted. In the United States, a pit bull is euthanized every thirty seconds, due in large part to an unwarranted stigma fed by biased and negative press. Abuse and neglect effect hundreds of thousands of individual animals. But at the same time, Gamand has also discovered another truth: families around the world have pit bulls they love and cherish.

The Story of the Fearless Woman Who Saves Elephants

In 1996, Sangdeaun “Lek” Chailert founded Thailand’s Elephant Nature Park, a safe haven for elephants rescued from the logging and tourism industries. For the last 20-plus years, she’s adopted these once-abused animals into her family. “They can spot her from across the fields and will run up to her, trumpeting excitedly,” Kelly Guerin, the filmmaker behind the short documentary Lek Chailert: An Unbound Story, remembers. “They surround her like they do an infant, protecting her under their giant bodies.” She, in turn, greets them with bananas and Thai lullabies. “I still don’t quite have words for it,” Guerin continues. “But in that tiny woman is the soul of an elephant.”

Breathtaking, Emotional Photos of Rescued Elephants

Sabachi, Kenya 2009. Photo © 2017 Joachim Schmeisser. All rights reserved. www.joachimschmeisser.com.

LAYONI, Photo © 2017 Joachim Schmeisser. Photo © 2017 Joachim Schmeisser. All rights reserved. www.joachimschmeisser.com.

Photographs of poached elephants are graphic and painful. In order to obtain their ivory tusks, poachers first shoot elephants with poison, and then, while the animals are still living and breathing, they rip their tusks (the equivalent of human teeth) from their skulls. Many die from hemorrhaging. They can survive for multiple days in agony. These images have been circulated widely in recent years, as elephant populations continue to be endangered by human activity.

But there’s only one such photograph in Elephants in Heaven by Joachim Schmeisser, a new photo book published by teNeues, and it’s at the volume’s conclusion. Cruelty isn’t Schmeisser’s chosen subject; instead, he tells a story of courage and kindness at the David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust in Nairobi, where elephants orphaned by poaching are nurtured by human hands until they are able to lead a wild and free life with their kind.

Powerful Photos Made with the Ashes of Deceased Shelter Dogs

When I first look at Mary Shannon Johnstone’s Stardust and Ashes photographs, my husband leans over my shoulder and whispers, “Wow, is that the universe?” The pictures look like constellations–Orion, Pegasus, Leo, Canis Major. In fact, they are cyanotypes made using the ashes of cremated dogs from local animal shelters. These dogs, while living, were discarded; they were unable to find homes and families, and they were euthanized.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get some visual inspiration into your day!