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Posts tagged: animal photography

A New Photo Book for People Who Love Cats

Midcentury Kitty on the Red Chair, 2015 © Sue Abramson

On the cover of PhotoCat., Schilt Publishing’s new ode to feline-kind, you’ll find a portrait of Sacha de Boer’s longtime companion– a picture simply called “Julius, tuned out, January 2008.” Julius casts his eyes down, inhabiting his own little black and white world. He might be falling asleep, or maybe he’s thinking about something important. In any case, he’s vulnerable in a way that cats rarely are.

The Sorrow and Grace of Abandoned Cats, in Photos

“I remember having the clear feeling that I was taking photos of people,” Italian photographer Sabrina Boem tells me of her first encounter with stray and abandoned cats. “I remember human eyes that talked to me. I loved those cats, their eyes, the way they looked at me.”

The Grace & Magic of Rural Living, in Photos

Electric Current © Andrew Heiser, Los Angeles, CA

German Pastoral Study #1, from the series Divine Animals: The Bovidae © R. J. Kern, Minneapolis, MN

Dinner Time © Michael Knapstein, Middleton, Wisconsin

Last summer, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a worldwide project for photographers. Here’s how it works: you can submit by tagging your photos #theprintswap. Every day, we curate submissions, and we notify photographers who have been selected. It’s free to submit, but winners pay a one-time fee of $40 per image. We cover shipping and printing, which is done by our friends at Skink Ink in Brooklyn, New York. Prints are then mailed out randomly across the globe, and every participating photographer receives a surprise print from one of their peers.

In recent weeks, we’ve been looking over The Print Swap archive and putting together online group shows with the pictures in the collection. In the past, we’ve explored themes like New Topographics, Seascapes, and the American West. Here, a collection of some of our favorite photographs of life in rural places.

Lee Deigaard Photographs the Backs of Horses as Landscapes

Lee Deigaard

Lee Deigaard

I had featured the work of New Orleans artist Lee Deigaard a few years ago, and I was so excited when I learned she’d be at the Living With Animals conference at Eastern Kentucky University in March so we could finally meet. I love the photographs in her series Equuleus (“part of a multi-media long-term project, In Your Dreams [Horses], exploring horse personality and individuality, sensory processing and proprioception, concepts of invitation, initiation, and trespass, and shared thresholds of experience between horse and human”) for their playful concept, their surreal, otherworldly quality, and the series’ thoughtful, poetic statement.

A Photographer Finds Terror and Magic on the Banks of a River (NSFW)

Indonesian photographer Aji Susanto Anom still carries with him the stories he heard as a child. In Javanese mythology, he says, the river is where people cast off their bad luck. When people make offerings here, evil spirits and unfortunate thoughts are thrown out into the water and left behind. At night, they linger there like ghosts.

Humankind’s Bizarre Relationship with Nature, In Photos

Victoria Crowned Pigeon, The National Aviary, Pittsburgh

Zebras, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh

In the last four years, Emma Kisiel has spent a great deal of her time in natural history museums throughout the United States, perched outside of the dioramas featuring taxidermied animals. The children who visit with their parents often asked similar questions:”Are these real animals?” The parents, Kisiel reports, usually gave ambiguous answers. They might say, “They were real. Now they’re not” or “They’re not real. They’re dead.”

Photos of Captive Animals That Will Stay With You After You Look Away

Malayan Sun Bear, Thailand 2008 © Jo-Anne McArthur

Lions, Lithuania 2016 © Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

Chimpanzee, Denmark 2016 © Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur met Mykoliukas the baboon at one of the many zoos she’s visited over the last decade. As she passed, his hands reached out and grabbed the bars of his cage. He tried to groom her, as he tries with many of the countless people who walk by. Over the course of the day, McArthur allowed him to groom her a few times, and he waited for her to return. When she left for the last time, he climbed to the top of his cage and strained his neck. He kept her in sight as long as he could.

McArthur writes about the lonesome baboon in her newest book Captive, which she created in zoos and aquaria in more than twenty countries around the world.

Dogs in Bed with Humans Photographed by Lisa Strömbeck

Lisa Strömbeck

Lisa Strömbeck

Several years ago, I saw the work Uniform by Lisa Strömbeck, based in Copenhagen, Denmark and Borrby, Sweden, when it appeared on Feature Shoot. The photos are funny – they show dogs, cats, and rabbits up close in the laps of people donned in fur of the same color and texture, the humans and non-humans morphing into one mass with eyes, tongues, and fleshy hands.

Submit to the 2017 ‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest for a Chance at $15,000 (Sponsored)

Galactic Rainbow © Michael Trofimov

Only one week left to enter! Submit your work by August 7th for a chance at $15,000 and other prizes!

In the last year, you might have encountered Greg Gulbransen’s photograph of a polar bear in Manitoba, Canada. Fire on Ice was taken during a frigid day, just as the strong sunlight was evaporating the ice. Gulbransen’s fingers froze, and he worried his camera battery wouldn’t survive the cold. It’s a breathtaking photograph, but it’s also a resonant and symbolic one in this era– a moment in time when melting sea ice is threatening polar bear populations around the world. It’s no surprise Fire on Ice took home the $15,000 Grand Prize at the 2016 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest, presented by The Weather Channel and Toyota.

2016 Grand Prize Winner: Fire on Ice © Greg Gulbransen

From now until August 7th, the fourth annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest is open for entries. Jurors will select images based on technical excellence, creativity, and adherence to one of three main themes: nature, adventure, and weather. The “nature” category includes any and all images telling stories about flora, fauna, and landscape; “adventure” images should be about exploring the great outdoors, and of course, “weather” photographs should capture the elements.

Photos of a Changing Landscape, Inspired by the Western Meadowlark

In 1994, MTV’s Karen Duffy made the trip to the least-visited state in America, a snow-covered North Dakota, to find answers. When she asked then-governor about his home, he responded, “Well, I think the best reason to visit North Dakota is you can still get lost here.” He paused before adding, “Not necessarily lost on a map, but you can really get lost mentally here.”

It’s twenty-something years later, and Seattle photographer Ian C. Bates has gotten lost many times in North Dakota. He picked the state in part because of its solitude. “It is easy to feel alone there,” he tells us, “I liked that feeling, but it also overcomes you after being there for a long time.”

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