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Posts tagged: travel photography

This Photographer Is a Professional Globetrotter (Sponsored)

So far this summer, photographer Rhiannon Taylor has sipped wine on a balcony while looking out over Sydney Harbour Bridge, dined on hot and sour soup in Siem Reap while listening to the sound of singing monks, and visited a TriBeCa penthouse with a rooftop garden.

In the last year alone, she’s traveled throughout Australia, South Africa, Bali, Abu Dhabi, Italy, the US, and more. She’s chronicled these unforgettable trips on her blog, In Bed With, where she takes followers on an international adventure, stopping over in some of the most unique and unconventional hotels, resorts, and lodges on earth.

A Rhiannon Taylor photograph is instantly recognizable. It’s clean and luxurious, and most often, it’s accompanied by travel notes, detailing where she ate, where she slept, where she wandered. Frequent comments on her Instagram include: “So jealous!” “Sounds Heavenly!!” and “This looks like the perfect place to escape!” (exclamation marks included).

When building her blog and her commercial website, Taylor chose Squarespace, a platform that understood her pristine aesthetic and on-the-go lifestyle. We asked the photographer to tell us about her life, her travels, and everything she’s learned along the way.

These Aerial Photos Will Make You See Famous Landscapes in a New Way

Yellowstone National Park

Three years ago, a GoPro photograph of the tallest building in the world, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, went viral and changed the course of Henry Do‘s life. Since then, the Las Vegas-based photographer has taken to the skies all over the world. Do bought his first drone back in 2015. He got his second drone a week later.

Photographer Tells Stories of Women Across Rural India

Japiyammal, 34, sells dry fish to make a living for her family. She also received a notice to vacate her home. After 50 years, the government suddenly seems to have woken up from its deep slumber and recognized the tourism potential in Dhanushkodi.

The fishing community here relies on traditional methods of reading the winds, stars and direction of waves. Without any formal training on modern techniques of fishing and unavailability of any GPS or Wireless devices, it is very hard for Japiyammal and other fishing community, to leave their land and learn the new ways of fishing elsewhere.

Initially, I thought Bharti, 13, was accompanying her parents to the fields since they did not want to leave her behind at home. But to my surprise, Bharti joined the work along with other adults on the salt plant. I saw her lifting the heavy pans full of salt, way too heavy for her thin arms. Her repeated movements of lifting salt and filling the tractors were fast but painful. It’s not just Bharti; there are scores of children waiting endlessly for an opportunity to lead a healthy life beyond these salt pans.

Deepti Asthana is a self-taught photographer living in Mumbai, India. She was born and raised in a north-Indian city called Bareilly in Uttar Pradesh, where she grew up in challenging circumstances. Asthana graduated with a degree in engineering from Tamil Nadu and spent some time working in Mumbai and Delhi; all this while she knew she wanted more out of life. In 2011 she was sent to London for a project from her organisation and met a landscape  photographer there. This meeting helped her discover a talent and passion for telling women’s stories through photography, which led Asthana to begin her project titled Women of India, in 2016. Her journey since then has brought the two Indias closer through her work and continues to shape her perspective of travelling alone through rural India.

Photographer Chris Burkard on Conservation, Fearlessness, and Sony Cameras (Sponsored)

Justin Quintal standing under the northern lights while filming for Under an Arctic Sky. Shot with Sony a7S II with 35mm f1.4 ©Chris Burkard/Massif

Photographer Chris Burkard has navigated frozen waters, survived rugged waves, and walked beaches so remote they don’t have names. He’s smiled his way through harsh blizzards, braved arctic winds, and come face-to-face with some of the wild animals who call this planet their home.

Burkard was only nineteen years old when left his job at the time to become a professional surf photographer, and his connection with water has only become stronger over the years. “My entire life I’ve lived less than a mile from the ocean,” he recently wrote on Instagram, where he has well over two and a half million followers.

But Burkard isn’t your typical surf photographer. “I set out to find the places others had written off as too cold, too remote, and too dangerous to surf,” he told the audience in a TED talk a few years ago. For his book Distant Shores, he documented surfing on six of the seven continents on earth.

His film Under An Arctic Sky tells the story of six surfers who made the journey to Iceland right before the arrival of the worst storm in a quarter-century. They risked everything for a shot at once-in-a-lifetime waves, and with just three hours of sunlight per day, their journey was illuminated by the aurora borealis.

The film is currently touring, and Burkard made time in his packed schedule to tell us a bit about his process and motivations. Below, he shares some of his most memorable stories and insights into the importance of conservation. He also gives us a peek into his camera bag and reveals how he uses Sony mirrorless cameras to make the photographs the Sierra Club once called “too good to be true.”

This Photographer Took Big Risks to Pursue His Dreams (Sponsored)

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When Andrew Kearns first started taking pictures, people told him it was almost impossible to make a living as a photographer. They thought he needed a “safe” career. They were wrong. In early 2015, he took a leap of faith and left his job at Starbucks. His Instagram took off, and soon after that, his dream became a reality.

Since then, he’s taken more risks. In the spring of 2016, he left everything behind to live out of his car and explore the world around him. These days, Kearns is still traveling, shooting sublime landscapes and chronicling his adventures on his popular vlog channel. He’s watched the sun rise and set over some of the most beautiful places on earth, and most recently, he’s hiked Ben Hope in Northern Scotland.

We interviewed Kearns about Instagram stardom, the importance of hard work, and the value of a Squarespace website.

Magical Photos from the World’s Surviving Tribes

Suri Girl with Orchid Wreath, Ethiopia

Sisters Meal Festival Dancer in Guizhou, China

Photographer Terri Gold says she wants to find “the grace notes” of humanity. She has vivid memories of spinning an old-fashioned globe as a child, and as an adult, she dreams of faraway places and the secrets they keep hidden.

Gold has devoted much of her life to visiting the Indigenous tribal communities of our planet. The longterm project Still Points in a Turning World has taken her to Namibia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, India, and China. She’s camped under the desert skies with the Wodaabe nomads, and she’s watched the sunrise over the villages of the Omo Valley, where people paint their bodies and adorn themselves with plants and shells and bones. She has driven through the hairpin turns of the mountains of Guizhou, a landscape etched with 2000-year-old rice terraces.

Minimalist Snapshots of the World by ‘the Agoraphobic Traveller’

Impressive cactus, Sun City, Arizona.

Football game, Chile.

“At first I was uncomfortable with sharing my mental health issues publicly,” photographer Jacqui Kenny, sometimes known as the “Agoraphobic Traveller,” says, “Now it’s something I talk openly about.”

One Photographer’s Whimsical Travels Around the World

Ciragan Palace Kempinski, Istanbul

Ortahisar Kalesi, Turkey

Photographer Ekaterina Mishchenkova, who goes by the name Katia Mi on Instagram, travels fifteen to twenty times each year, and every picture she makes is informed by the architecture, heritage, and language of her surroundings.

Dizzying Cityscapes by an Adventurous 20-Year-Old Photographer

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Singapore

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Singapore

Yik Keat Lee’s favorite photographs are the ones that give him what he calls the “flashback effect.” No matter where in the world he is, he makes pictures in order to fast to moments of adventure and intensity before they slip away. Brief recollections can last forever if he’s there to photograph them.

One Photographer’s Story of World Travel and Fear of Missing Out (Sponsored)

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© Austin Rhee

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Austin Rhee’s Squarespace website

Scrolling through photographer Austin Rhee‘s Instagram feed, you’ll see the same word commented over and over again: “WOW.” You’ll also find “Sweet!” “Crazy!” and the occasional “Stoppppppp!” And that pretty much sums it up. Rhee takes impossibly beautiful photographs of impossibly beautiful places.

Whether he’s in his hometown of San Francisco or navigating a snowy day in Norway’s Lofoten islands, Rhee has an enviable understanding of the whims of nature. He knows when to wake up so the light falls across the terrain in just the right way; he chases mist and sunrises and dewy, silent streets.

Rhee represents the rising generation of photographers and influencers in that he has both a powerful mainstream appeal and a vision that can’t be reproduced. He’s been commissioned to photograph some of the most breathtaking places on earth, and he’s done it on his own terms. We interviewed the photographer about his adventures, his social media stardom, and his gorgeous Squarespace website, which he uses to share his work with potential clients around the world.

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