Menu

Posts tagged: interior photography

The Life of One Young Lady with Down Syndrome, in Photos

When the photographer Snezhana von Buedingen first visited Sofie’s family at their farm in east Germany, she stayed for three days. She spent her waking hours shadowing Sofie, taking her time to soak in the details of her everyday life. With time, the pair forged a powerful bond; Meeting Sofie is the photographer’s ongoing ode to her friend and muse–a young woman who happens to have down syndrome.

The Secret Life of Alpacas, in Photos

According to Andean mythology, alpacas are gifts from the gods and goddesses. They arrived in our world under one condition: we must always treat them well and tend to their needs. Many centuries later, the photographer Daniel Gebhart de Koekkoek pays homage to these age-old animals with Better Living with Alpacas, a new calendar in which he imagines the secret life of a few mischievous fellows.

Join Us in Brooklyn for The Print Swap Holiday Exhibition!

Photos (clockwise from left): @bottenvikenmatters@tinetti_julie@alixjoyce@konrad.jpg

Plastic Planet © Wolf Silveri (@wolf.silveri), Rosenheim, Germany

Every Day is a Gift © Deborah Hodges (@debhodges), Gig Harbor, WA

In 2016, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap in hopes of connecting photographers across the world. Eight international exhibitions later and with more on the way, we’re thrilled to announce the largest Print Swap show ever, taking place at the beautiful ROOT Studios in Brooklyn on December 13th. This will be our second holiday party, and every single photographer who participated in the swap between mid-September and mid-November will exhibit their work. We have artists from all over the globe represented, and with some of them traveling from faraway locales to attend, it will surely be a night to remember. If you’re in town, be sure to RSVP here.

A Poignant Behind-the-Scenes Look at a Suicide Respite Center

“My background is in engineering and research. I quite enjoy, now, reflecting on how I became mad and that process of where the brain takes you. That I find fascinating. I think it’s quite difficult to become suicidal really. You need trigger points, some people need just need one, I needed quite a few. But once you’re there…

“The first time that I had heard the word Maytree I had been sectioned. I was in Chase Farm, Enfield, in the hospital unit. There were 4 people around the table chit chatting and 2 of those had both been guests at Maytree. It was 2005. It was coming up to the Christmas period and I didn’t think I’d get through it. One of the women said maybe you could go and stay at Maytree.

“Maytree was a wonderful safe place. I remember I was in a bad place. It really was quite bad. I couldn’t cook or do anything for myself. I used to love porridge. On the first morning Michael made me porridge and I thought… that little thing, making the porridge, was good.

“When I got better I thought maybe I should volunteer at Maytree. I think I have a sense of loyalty to Maytree. I find it therapeutic going there. It’s sometimes very challenging but I’ve never really thought it’s too overpowering, but when you walk through that door you never know…” – Michael

Maytree is a house in Finsbury Park, London. It has four bedrooms, and its inhabitants change all the time. As a suicide respite center, it serves as a temporary home to people in crisis. Guests stay for four days and five nights only; during that time, they can speak openly with volunteers and peers. They can talk about anything and everything, or they can talk about nothing. There is no judgement, and the environment is decidedly non-clinical.

There are about 150 volunteers currently working at Maytree. The photographer Daniel Regan is one of them. His book and exhibition project I Want to Live tells the story of this unusual house and the people who walk through its doors. 

A Portrait of Vintage New York City Through Found Photographs

Rocco’s Barber Shop c.1989 from 6×7 negative

Frank Sinatra c.1955 from original 2.25 negative

Back in the day, New York City was a collector’s paradise. Every weekend, empty parking lots would be transformed into bustling flea markets filled with vintage goods, from brocade covered antique chairs and velvet opera cloaks to crates of vinyl record albums and boxes of old photographs.

Through the 1970s and ‘80s, Williamsburg native Ray Simone would make his way around town, hitting up flea markets, street fairs, stoop sales and estate sales in search of old camera negatives documenting scenes of daily life in New York City. A professional photographer by trade, Simone had the eye and the ability to spot a classic scene of city life.

Unforgettable Photos from One of the World’s Last Matrilineal Societies

Pema Lamu (73) from the village Zhashi. Faces and hands of most Mosuo women are marked by the daily working hours in the fields. There is a clear division of labor between men and women. Women are responsible for household duties and farmwork and men for heavy labor and funerals. Usually, it is the Dabu who is working the hardest.

Du Zhi Ma holds a photograph in her hand, a portrait of her, which was taken about 35 years ago. In the photo, she carries one of her three children in her arms.

In order to get to China’s Lugu Lake, where the Mosuo people live, German photographer Karolin Klüppel traveled by road. That road, she says, has only been around for one or two decades. Before then, the area was relatively remote, sheltered from curious outsiders. Today, there’s not only a road but also an airport. Tourists arrive by plane a few times a week. Life is changing for the Mosuo, especially the women.

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at ‘Terrorist Rehab’ in Saudi Arabia

A classroom for members of the jail is lined with desks. Even though the desks are new, the participants have scratched their names, dates, hearts, and slogans into the wood. The black seats with wooden desks reminded me of a line of black clad IS members carrying kalashnikovs. At Al-Ha’ir prison, I had to use the prison’s camera and wasn’t allowed to take photos of any of the staff or inmates, which left me to photograph the evidence left behind by the inmates. I photographed some of the etchings in the wood, but the prison censored these photos. © David Degner/Getty Images

Inmates have a small area with astroturf to enjoy the sun at the end of each cell block. The Ha’ir prison is primarily for terrorists, we are told. Talking to human rights activists, however, gives the impression that there are different departments with different standards. Political prisoners sometimes come to Ha’ir, but hardly in the comfortable cells jihadists have. While the writers were interviewing another inmate under supervision, I was able to talk with some inmates alone. They saw many new inmates arrive after the bombing of Shia mosques in the eastern provinces in May 2015 and felt they were arrested randomly. As one inmate said, there is always the official story and then the unofficial story which they won’t let us see. But he said he couldn’t go into details. © David Degner/Getty Images

The Family House is designed like a boutique hotel with all the amenities for a family visit. The suites allow inmates to live with their family for short periods of time while incarcerated. The families and inmates arrive in chauffeured cars with the hotel logo; guests are given a key for their rooms, and the all female staff cares for them during their stay. © David Degner/Getty Images

In May of last year, Cairo photographer David Degner and Swiss journalist Monika Bolliger traveled to the Al-Ha’ir Prison in Saudi Arabia to see the living conditions of men who had been incarcerated on terrorism-related charges.

Stunning Photos of Old Havana Before Everything Changed

When photographer Joseph Romeo traveled to Havana in March of 2014, he could not have predicted that in a few short months, President Barack Obama would announce his intentions to normalize relations with Cuba. These days, we’re used to seeing photographs of the city, but when Romeo was there, everything was new, and the streets teetered right on the precipice of drastic change.

The Man Who Photographed a Forgotten America by Moonlight

Late Arrival, 2011

Diner, 2011

Noel Kerns is an American time traveler. His camera has taken him on road trips across Texas, down Route 66, and through the ghost towns of the American West. He’s found these bygone patches of the United States under the light of the full moon, synching his trips with the calendar of lunar phases.

The Woman Who Wanted to Photograph Every House in Poland

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

Zofia Rydet mentioned in one of her letters that taking photos for her is like vodka to an alcoholic,” curator Sebastian Cichocki says of the 20th century photographer, “It’s like an addiction, so she collects more and more and more and she’s never satisfied.”

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get some visual inspiration into your day!

5 Weekly Tips to Advance Your Photo Career

Expert advice from photo industry professionals every Friday + get our guide to mastering Instagram (for FREE)!

You have Successfully Subscribed!