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Posts tagged: interior photography

Unforgettable Photos from One of the World’s Last Matrilineal Societies

Pema Lamu (73) from the village Zhashi. Faces and hands of most Mosuo women are marked by the daily working hours in the fields. There is a clear division of labor between men and women. Women are responsible for household duties and farmwork and men for heavy labor and funerals. Usually, it is the Dabu who is working the hardest.

Du Zhi Ma holds a photograph in her hand, a portrait of her, which was taken about 35 years ago. In the photo, she carries one of her three children in her arms.

In order to get to China’s Lugu Lake, where the Mosuo people live, German photographer Karolin Klüppel traveled by road. That road, she says, has only been around for one or two decades. Before then, the area was relatively remote, sheltered from curious outsiders. Today, there’s not only a road but also an airport. Tourists arrive by plane a few times a week. Life is changing for the Mosuo, especially the women.

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at ‘Terrorist Rehab’ in Saudi Arabia

A classroom for members of the jail is lined with desks. Even though the desks are new, the participants have scratched their names, dates, hearts, and slogans into the wood. The black seats with wooden desks reminded me of a line of black clad IS members carrying kalashnikovs. At Al-Ha’ir prison, I had to use the prison’s camera and wasn’t allowed to take photos of any of the staff or inmates, which left me to photograph the evidence left behind by the inmates. I photographed some of the etchings in the wood, but the prison censored these photos. © David Degner/Getty Images

Inmates have a small area with astroturf to enjoy the sun at the end of each cell block. The Ha’ir prison is primarily for terrorists, we are told. Talking to human rights activists, however, gives the impression that there are different departments with different standards. Political prisoners sometimes come to Ha’ir, but hardly in the comfortable cells jihadists have. While the writers were interviewing another inmate under supervision, I was able to talk with some inmates alone. They saw many new inmates arrive after the bombing of Shia mosques in the eastern provinces in May 2015 and felt they were arrested randomly. As one inmate said, there is always the official story and then the unofficial story which they won’t let us see. But he said he couldn’t go into details. © David Degner/Getty Images

The Family House is designed like a boutique hotel with all the amenities for a family visit. The suites allow inmates to live with their family for short periods of time while incarcerated. The families and inmates arrive in chauffeured cars with the hotel logo; guests are given a key for their rooms, and the all female staff cares for them during their stay. © David Degner/Getty Images

In May of last year, Cairo photographer David Degner and Swiss journalist Monika Bolliger traveled to the Al-Ha’ir Prison in Saudi Arabia to see the living conditions of men who had been incarcerated on terrorism-related charges.

Stunning Photos of Old Havana Before Everything Changed

When photographer Joseph Romeo traveled to Havana in March of 2014, he could not have predicted that in a few short months, President Barack Obama would announce his intentions to normalize relations with Cuba. These days, we’re used to seeing photographs of the city, but when Romeo was there, everything was new, and the streets teetered right on the precipice of drastic change.

The Man Who Photographed a Forgotten America by Moonlight

Late Arrival, 2011

Diner, 2011

Noel Kerns is an American time traveler. His camera has taken him on road trips across Texas, down Route 66, and through the ghost towns of the American West. He’s found these bygone patches of the United States under the light of the full moon, synching his trips with the calendar of lunar phases.

The Woman Who Wanted to Photograph Every House in Poland

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

Zofia Rydet mentioned in one of her letters that taking photos for her is like vodka to an alcoholic,” curator Sebastian Cichocki says of the 20th century photographer, “It’s like an addiction, so she collects more and more and more and she’s never satisfied.”

Photos of the New Orleans Neighborhood That Disappeared

Waiting, 2011

Feeding, 2009

Stephen Hilger didn’t photograph what became known as “Lower Mid-City,” New Orleans, in hopes of saving it. He photographed it after it could no longer be saved.

Lust, Desire, and Longing Behind-the-Scenes at Japan’s Love Hotels

Belgian photographer Zaza Bertrand doesn’t speak Japanese and was only able to gather bits and pieces of words exchanged between the people she met in the country’s popular rabuhos, or love hotels. The mystery was part of the appeal.

These ‘Shop Cats’ In Hong Kong Will Make You Smile

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© Marcel Heijnen, ‘Hong Kong Shop Cats’ #5, Hong Kong 2016, Courtesy Blue Lotus Gallery, Hong Kong

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© Marcel Heijnen, ‘Hong Kong Shop Cats’ #18, Hong Kong 2016, Courtesy Blue Lotus Gallery, Hong Kong

After decades of living with cats, Dutch photographer Marcel Heijnen found himself in Hong Kong without one to call his own. Then he met Dau Ding. And Ah Dai, and Siu Faa, and Fei Zai, the shop cats of the Sai Ying Pun and Sheung Wan neighborhoods.

Confessions from a Wild West Ghost Town (Sponsored)

Bodie, California, USA. Old haunted gold rush ghost town.

View of Bodie © Julien McRoberts / Offset

Bodie, California, USA. Old haunted gold rush ghost town.

Old car © Julien McRoberts / Offset

When New York City-based photographer and Offset artist Julien McRoberts drove around the bend and into Bodie, a ghost town in Northern California, the sight stopped her in her tracks: “I had to get my jaw off of the ground.” Before her eyes rose the remains of the Wild West, but unlike so many towns from the gold rush era, this one was preserved, trapped in the 19th century.

Breathtaking Images of Syria Before the Civil War (Sponsored)

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Azm Palace in Hama © Lisa Limer / Offset

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A rural village © Lisa Limer / Offset

In the spring of 2001, Rhode Island-based photographer Lisa Limer traveled to Syria on assignment for a leading travel magazine. When the photographs were, as she puts it, “at the printers, ready to run,” the story was abruptly shut down, and her breathtaking photographs of Syria were not published.

Looking back on the images she took in Syria, Limer can’t help but feel the ache of all that’s been lost in the last fifteen years and in the wake of civil war. “I know now that most everything that I photographed has been destroyed,” she admits, her mind whirling back fifteen years. She walked through Damascus and Aleppo, captured Homs before it was all but razed to the ground.

In 2015, close to the anniversary of her visit, the ancient city of Palmyra, which holds treasures dating back to centuries before the Common Era and was once held by the Roman Empire, was seised by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. In the intervening year, ISIL would execute its prisoners at the ancient Roman Theatre at Palmyra; the 82-year-old archeologist Khaled al-Asaad would be interrogated regarding the locations of the site’s antiquities, and he would die safeguarding the information.

The Azm Palace, built during the Ottoman Empire, the Umayyad Mosque, considered one of the most holy sites in the world, and The Church of Saint Simeon Stylites, the single oldest remaining Byzantine church, still stand.

When asked if she felt nervous flying to Syria so many moons before the Civil War, Limer says simply, “I had no apprehension.” She trusted her own footing there, and although she made sure to dress according to the country’s conservative status quo—she was, in her words, “certainly aware of her womanhood”—Limer suggests that her gender was also an asset, allowing her to approach and photograph local women as they made their way throughout the cities.

Still, the photographer felt the tremors of a country in pain. “Even in 2001, you felt the sadness,” she explains, adding “In all my travels, I had never left a country feeling more depressed.” With a government guide watching over ever move she made, she witnessed the aftermath of conflicts and failed uprisings; her eyes lingered over “bullet holes and burnt out buildings.”

Limer reflects on her 2001 trip to Syria with melancholy and an inescapable longing for something that left many years ago: “This trip could now never be repeated. Regrettably, it is what makes this experience unforgettable.”

Limer’s work from Syria is represented by Offset.

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