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Posts tagged: street photography

‘Aggressive’ Street Photographer Captures Angry People in Beijing

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“No Photos!
What are you doing?
You have no rights!
You scared me!
Do you know how to respect others!?
You are crazy!
NO!!!
Fuck you!!!”

The statements above may sound all too familiar to any dedicated street photographer. Encountering suspicion, a refusal to be photographed and even criticism or insults when out on a shoot are all part of the job. This is what Beijing-based photographer Jiwei Han heard and intentionally sought out in his controversial project entitled No, which he captured in the streets of Beijing.

No is consciously the product of an invasive photographic approach. Jiwei purposefully avoided asking for permission prior to photographing strangers on the street, using what he describes as an “aggressive method”. The title of the project is self-explanatory, echoing the response of many unwilling subjects when Jiwei caught them off guard.

Photographing people against their will, Jiwei experienced “an evil sense of satisfaction” upon succeeding, though admits that he was unsure about whether or not what he did was right reflecting on the disputable methods used, “normally I am a gentle person and ask whether it’s okay before taking any pictures. I’m not usually so rude”.

Ethiopia’s Emerging Skate Scene Shot from the Hip

Ethiopia Skate a grassroots skateboarding community on the stree

Henok the most talented skater in Ethiopia, doing what he always does – crazy stuff – kickflipping down a Container.

The Berlin-based photographer Daniel Reiter headed to Ethiopia in January 2015 to work on a documentary assignment, though knew he also wanted to dedicate some of his time in the country to a second, more personal project. Ahead of the trip Daniel discovered Ethiopia’s emerging skate scene via ethiopiaskate.org, exchanged some emails with skaters, and immediately saw the potential of this story, he explains: “One of the best things about skating is how it illustrates, perhaps more so than with other sports, just how strong and tough these kids are. They move with unstoppable courage, and if they fall they just get back up again”.

Decades of Extraordinary Photos Taken on the Streets of NYC

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A couple on the subway, 1980.

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Wig stand, Orchard Street, 1975.

For photographer and photo editor Carrie Boretz, New York City has always been brimming with the “kissing, sleeping, daydreaming” of strangers. Her upcoming book STREET chronicles her adventures in the metropolis from 1975 to 1998, when she was driven to explore breathlessly the contours and crevices of a city rife with conflict, anxiety, and gentleness.

Stylish Seniors Who Make ‘The Golden Years’ Their Most Fabulous

Roberta Haze, 78

Roberta Haze, 78

Joy Venturini Bianchi, 77

Joy Venturini Bianchi, 77

In his wonderful introduction Ari Seth Cohen’s new book, Advanced Style: Older & Wiser, a sequel to the original 2012 photo book and 2014 documentary, Simon Doonan names the photographer “the pied piper of glamorous oldsters.” Indeed, Cohen has spent the last eight years luring fabulous fashionable seniors out of the shadows and into the limelight.

Charm and Nostalgia Found in Berlin’s Overlooked High-Rises

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The post-war apartment buildings in Malte Brandenburg’s Stacked series tower over Berlin with their muted colors and forlorn designs. Built in the mid-20th century to provide modern and affordable housing to middle class families, these concrete stacks might looks identical to some, but to Brandenburg, he sees each housing estate as a separate entity, adorned with nostalgia and brimming with life.

Surreal, Gravity-Defying Photography Brought to You By ‘Mikes Butt’

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Mike Dempsey (aka Mikes Butt) is a Los Angeles-based photographer who stuns us with his gravity-defying images that take inspiration from his first love: skating. Each photo he produces combines a touch of danger and surrealism, with skater-esque poses grabbing our attention from afar.

After Going Blind in One Eye, A Street Photographer Contends with Darkness

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Trafalgar Square, London. 2011

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Dubai. 2014

Until last year, when he lost all sight from his left eye, London-based photographer Walter Rothwell didn’t give much thought to his vision, though the eye had been partially blind since he was ten years old, when it was sliced by a chunk of ice. Over the course of 35 years, he had become accustomed to seeing the world differently, with blurred but permanent double vision. Last year, however, he was forced to reckon with darkness when his retina unexpectedly detached, leaving him fully sightless on the lefthand side.

Instagram Sensation ‘The Dogist’ Releases New Photo Book Featuring 1,000 Canines

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Polo, French Bulldog, 2 years old. “Polo frequents hospitals as a therapy dog, participates in cancer awareness walks, and helps raise money for homeless shelters.” Excerpted from The Dogist by Elias Weiss Friedman (Artisan Books). Copyright © 2015. Photographs by The Dogist, LLC

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Lexi, Mix, 1 year old. “People look at her and think she’s disabled. We consider her ‘specially abled.'”

Before he was The Dogist, New York City-based photographer Elias Weiss Friedman was a little boy who loved dogs. As soon as he could walk, he was found sneaking out with his grandmother’s dog Oreo, who steadfastly and heroically stood between the toddler and the street until they were found by adults. When he got his first camera, his black lab Ruby became his constant muse, always ready to break out a smile and strike a pose. Years later, Friedman has earned his epithet by photographing literally thousands of dogs of all shapes, sizes and colors out and about in the streets of New York and throughout the globe.

‘Women, Children and Loitering Men’: A Glimpse at Manchester’s Slums in the 1960s

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Manchester, 1968, © Shirley Baker Estate, Courtesy of Mary Evans Picture Library

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Hulme, July 1965, © Shirley Baker Estate, Courtesy of the Shirley Baker Estate

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Manchester, 1967, © Shirley Baker Estate, Courtesy of the Shirley Baker Estate

The streets of the Manchester slums, in which children played on concrete roads and their parents watched as terraced homes were razed to the ground in favor of new developments, became in the 1960s and two decades following like a home away from home for British street photographer Shirley Baker (1932-2014), whose middle class family owned a furniture store in Salford.

‘Hip Hop Revolution’: New Exhibition Revisits the Origins of DJing, Breaking, and Rapping in New York City

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© Janette Beckman, Big Daddy Kane, 1988, Courtesy of the Photographer

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© Martha Cooper, Little Crazy Legs strikes an impromptu pose during Wild Style shoot, Riverside Park, Manhattan, 1983, Courtesy of the Photographer

For Hip Hop Revolution, legendary photographers Janette Beckman, Joe Conzo and Martha Cooper join together for a group exhibition at the Museum of the City of New York that brings us back to the early days of hip hop. Over one hundred images, spanning the thirteen years between 1977 and 1990, capture the city at a time when hip hop culture, DJing, breaking, and rapping was first taking over the streets, when groups like Salt ’n’ Pepa became fashion icons and the likes Afrika Bambaataa first developed breakbeat mixes. As The Beastie Boys, Run DMC, and Queen Latifa skyrocketed from local New York venues onto the international stage, these three photographers were there alongside them, snapping away at what they knew would be a movement remembered for generations to come.

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