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Posts tagged: travel photography

One Photographer’s Story of World Travel and Fear of Missing Out (Sponsored)

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© Austin Rhee

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Austin Rhee’s Squarespace website

Scrolling through photographer Austin Rhee‘s Instagram feed, you’ll see the same word commented over and over again: “WOW.” You’ll also find “Sweet!” “Crazy!” and the occasional “Stoppppppp!” And that pretty much sums it up. Rhee takes impossibly beautiful photographs of impossibly beautiful places.

Whether he’s in his hometown of San Francisco or navigating a snowy day in Norway’s Lofoten islands, Rhee has an enviable understanding of the whims of nature. He knows when to wake up so the light falls across the terrain in just the right way; he chases mist and sunrises and dewy, silent streets.

Rhee represents the rising generation of photographers and influencers in that he has both a powerful mainstream appeal and a vision that can’t be reproduced. He’s been commissioned to photograph some of the most breathtaking places on earth, and he’s done it on his own terms. We interviewed the photographer about his adventures, his social media stardom, and his gorgeous Squarespace website, which he uses to share his work with potential clients around the world.

Haunting, Melancholic Photos of Iceland’s Jokulsarlon Lagoon

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At the Jokulsarlon Lagoon in Iceland, California photographer Aaron Fallon says the hours overlap and blur. He and his wife traversed the icy terrain in July, when the sun never sets. “It’s a bit harder to keep track of time when it doesn’t get dark,” he admits.

12 Foggy Photos Make Earth Look Like Another Planet (Sponsored)

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San Francisco © Ronny Ritschel / Offset

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Upper Peninsula, Michigan © William Rugen / Offset

There’s an old Inuit myth from Newfoundland and Labrador about a man who was hunted by a wild beast. The man fled the creature by crossing a river. When the beast asked the man how he had gotten to the other side, he replied that he had drunk all the water, leading the beast to try the feat for himself. The creature drank so much water he burst, leaving behind only a thick shroud of fog where his body once stood.

There are many variations on the old legend, the origin story of fog. It makes sense that the Inuit people should be so fascinated with mist since Newfoundland is home to the foggiest place on earth: The Great Banks.

These days, our explanation for the area’s fog is more scientific: the icy water of the Labrador Current collides with the warm waters of the Gulf Stream.

The Magic and Mythos of the Faroe Islands (Sponsored)

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© Kevin Faingnaert / Offset

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© Oscar Bjarnason / Image Source / Offset

Offset Artist Kevin Faingnaert will never forget the day he met Simun Hanssen, a resident of Svinoy, one of the remotest of the Faroe Islands. Hanssen, a retired sailor, lived alongside only eleven other people on this enchanted island, spending his time searching for messages in bottles, washed ashore from faraway places. He had love letters, poems, drawings sent by strangers; some he had contacted, when the glass bottles included addresses from Norway, Canada, Scotland, or Iceland.

These Drone Photos Will Inspire You to Explore the World (Sponsored)

Island of Fuertaventura.

Ocean Drive, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands © Karolis Janulis / Offset

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Yoga in the park, Vilnius, Lithuania © Karolis Janulis / Offset

Offset Artist Karolis Janulis always wanted wings, to see the world not as humans see it but as the birds do. The self-taught Lithuanian photographer plunged headlong into drone photography when the DJI Phantom hit the market, but his intended destination has always been the sky.

Tiny Atlas Quarterly Exhibition Celebrates Travel, Light and a New Camera Bag

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© Teal Thomsen

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In the last two years, Tiny Atlas Quarterly has gone from a seed in the mind of Oakland photographer Emily Nathan to a leading travel and lifestyle magazine. As of this writing, the Instagram hashtag #mytinyatlas has more than 1.7 million submissions, with photographers all over the world vying for a coveted spot on the @tinyatlasquarterly feed

These Photos of Wicker (Yes, Wicker) Will Leave You Breathless

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© David Santiago Garcia / Westend61 / Offset

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© David Santiago Garcia / Westend61 / Offset

The population of Canamares in the Spanish province of Cuenca lingers at just below 600, but for five months each year, it transforms into a dreamscape of red and orange. Wicker, or mimbre in Spanish, grows in bamboo-like stalks from November until May.

Canamares is part of a wicker route that stretches for a just under 25 miles of undulating terrain near the River Escabas, deep ravines, gorges, and thickets of pines. It is the main producer of the region’s wicker, and while the area once was home to traditional basket-weavers, the industry has been in serious decline over recent years.

We found these exquisite photographs of wicker cultivation in Canamares in Offset’s rich collection of photography, and yearned to know more about the history of the forgotten basket makers. The dearth of information we were able to uncover speaks to the diminishing role of natural wicker, which takes more effort to maintain than the popular synthetic versions.

The Unparalleled Joy of Dogs on the Beach (Sponsored)

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Magnolia, Massachusetts © Cavan Images / Offset

“A dog can never tell you what she knows from the smells of the world, but you know, watching her, that you know almost nothing,” the great poet Mary Oliver writes in her 2013 book Dog Songs. Anyone who has ever seen a dog at the beach knows this to be true. Whether they’re chasing a ball or digging holes in the shade, dogs love the beach in some indelible, instinctual way that us humans can never truly grasp.

It’s tragic that so many beautiful beaches are closed to dogs during peak summer months, but this story is not about those beaches. It’s about those that welcome canines large and small. In honor of the season, we culled the Offset collection in search of the most joyous, life-affirming pictures of dogs on the beach.

Photos of The Iconic Route 66 Take Us Back in Time (Sponsored)

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Route 66 Diner on Central Ave, Albuquerque, New Mexico © Julien McRoberts / Offset

Route 66 stretch of highway

Route 66, California © Cavan Images / Offset

Holbrook,Arizona, United States. Route 66.

Fake dinosaurs along Route 66 in Holbrook, Arizona © Julien McRoberts / Offset

“I feel like much of our country has become one big strip mall,” confides American photographer Julien McRoberts, who has spent much of her life traveling the world. But there’s one place that maintains the allure of the old American West: Route 66, the 91-year-old highway running through eight states, from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California.

Route 66, the subject of the nations best rhythm and blues songs (Route 66 by Bobby Troupe) and literary classics (The Grapes of Wrath, On The Road), was decommissioned in 1985, 60 years after it opened. In the words of Smithsonian Magazine’s Megan Gambino, the American treasure “is not aging gracefully.” Though some 85% of the road remains drivable, much of the once-flourishing businesses that once lined the iconic highway have packed up and moved along. Places are abandoned; the neon signs have been turned off for the final time.

Still, sentimental souls still cherish the long-forgotten highway. Some motel owners refused to leave their beloved “Mother Road,” and some portions have survived the fall from grace. McRoberts, an Offset photographer, understands the persevering spirit of Route 66 more than most. Over the course of four years, she made the journey across the entire 2,400 miles that once supported the country’s westward migration.

Photographers Travel Off the Beaten Path in Bali (Sponsored)

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Fountains of natural spring water, Tirta Empul Temple, Bali © Joel Collins / Offset

Surfers at sunrise. Bali. Indonesia.

Surfers heading out at sunrise © Aurora Photos / Offset

“The island is a photographer’s paradise,” says Offset Artist Joel Collins, who not only photographs Bali himself but also leads photo tours for other travelers. The weather, the people, the food, it’s all there if you know where to look. The trick, he confesses, is to avoid the places all the other tourists go.

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