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Posts tagged: travel photography

The Magic and Mythos of the Faroe Islands (Sponsored)

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© Kevin Faingnaert / Offset

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© Oscar Bjarnason / Image Source / Offset

Offset Artist Kevin Faingnaert will never forget the day he met Simun Hanssen, a resident of Svinoy, one of the remotest of the Faroe Islands. Hanssen, a retired sailor, lived alongside only eleven other people on this enchanted island, spending his time searching for messages in bottles, washed ashore from faraway places. He had love letters, poems, drawings sent by strangers; some he had contacted, when the glass bottles included addresses from Norway, Canada, Scotland, or Iceland.

These Drone Photos Will Inspire You to Explore the World (Sponsored)

Island of Fuertaventura.

Ocean Drive, Fuerteventura, Canary Islands © Karolis Janulis / Offset

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Yoga in the park, Vilnius, Lithuania © Karolis Janulis / Offset

Offset Artist Karolis Janulis always wanted wings, to see the world not as humans see it but as the birds do. The self-taught Lithuanian photographer plunged headlong into drone photography when the DJI Phantom hit the market, but his intended destination has always been the sky.

Tiny Atlas Quarterly Exhibition Celebrates Travel, Light and a New Camera Bag

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© Teal Thomsen

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In the last two years, Tiny Atlas Quarterly has gone from a seed in the mind of Oakland photographer Emily Nathan to a leading travel and lifestyle magazine. As of this writing, the Instagram hashtag #mytinyatlas has more than 1.7 million submissions, with photographers all over the world vying for a coveted spot on the @tinyatlasquarterly feed

These Photos of Wicker (Yes, Wicker) Will Leave You Breathless

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© David Santiago Garcia / Westend61 / Offset

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© David Santiago Garcia / Westend61 / Offset

The population of Canamares in the Spanish province of Cuenca lingers at just below 600, but for five months each year, it transforms into a dreamscape of red and orange. Wicker, or mimbre in Spanish, grows in bamboo-like stalks from November until May.

Canamares is part of a wicker route that stretches for a just under 25 miles of undulating terrain near the River Escabas, deep ravines, gorges, and thickets of pines. It is the main producer of the region’s wicker, and while the area once was home to traditional basket-weavers, the industry has been in serious decline over recent years.

We found these exquisite photographs of wicker cultivation in Canamares in Offset’s rich collection of photography, and yearned to know more about the history of the forgotten basket makers. The dearth of information we were able to uncover speaks to the diminishing role of natural wicker, which takes more effort to maintain than the popular synthetic versions.

The Unparalleled Joy of Dogs on the Beach (Sponsored)

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Magnolia, Massachusetts © Cavan Images / Offset

“A dog can never tell you what she knows from the smells of the world, but you know, watching her, that you know almost nothing,” the great poet Mary Oliver writes in her 2013 book Dog Songs. Anyone who has ever seen a dog at the beach knows this to be true. Whether they’re chasing a ball or digging holes in the shade, dogs love the beach in some indelible, instinctual way that us humans can never truly grasp.

It’s tragic that so many beautiful beaches are closed to dogs during peak summer months, but this story is not about those beaches. It’s about those that welcome canines large and small. In honor of the season, we culled the Offset collection in search of the most joyous, life-affirming pictures of dogs on the beach.

Photos of The Iconic Route 66 Take Us Back in Time (Sponsored)

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Route 66 Diner on Central Ave, Albuquerque, New Mexico © Julien McRoberts / Offset

Route 66 stretch of highway

Route 66, California © Cavan Images / Offset

Holbrook,Arizona, United States. Route 66.

Fake dinosaurs along Route 66 in Holbrook, Arizona © Julien McRoberts / Offset

“I feel like much of our country has become one big strip mall,” confides American photographer Julien McRoberts, who has spent much of her life traveling the world. But there’s one place that maintains the allure of the old American West: Route 66, the 91-year-old highway running through eight states, from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California.

Route 66, the subject of the nations best rhythm and blues songs (Route 66 by Bobby Troupe) and literary classics (The Grapes of Wrath, On The Road), was decommissioned in 1985, 60 years after it opened. In the words of Smithsonian Magazine’s Megan Gambino, the American treasure “is not aging gracefully.” Though some 85% of the road remains drivable, much of the once-flourishing businesses that once lined the iconic highway have packed up and moved along. Places are abandoned; the neon signs have been turned off for the final time.

Still, sentimental souls still cherish the long-forgotten highway. Some motel owners refused to leave their beloved “Mother Road,” and some portions have survived the fall from grace. McRoberts, an Offset photographer, understands the persevering spirit of Route 66 more than most. Over the course of four years, she made the journey across the entire 2,400 miles that once supported the country’s westward migration.

Photographers Travel Off the Beaten Path in Bali (Sponsored)

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Fountains of natural spring water, Tirta Empul Temple, Bali © Joel Collins / Offset

Surfers at sunrise. Bali. Indonesia.

Surfers heading out at sunrise © Aurora Photos / Offset

“The island is a photographer’s paradise,” says Offset Artist Joel Collins, who not only photographs Bali himself but also leads photo tours for other travelers. The weather, the people, the food, it’s all there if you know where to look. The trick, he confesses, is to avoid the places all the other tourists go.

In Defense of the ‘Little Person, Big Landscape’ Instagram Trend (Sponsored)

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Rock spur, Chiesa in Valmalenco, Lombardy, Italy © Dirk Wüstenhagen / Westend61 / Offset

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Sand Dunes, Lencois Maranhenses National Park, Brazil © Ronald Patrick / Offset

Half a year ago, National Geographic photographer Jimmy Chin and writer Grayson Schaffer coined the term “Little person, big landscape!” to describe the kind of picture that appeals to the masses of the Instagram era. We’ve all seen it; a sole figure is dwarfed by a mountain, a forest, a vast expanse of wildflowers or snow. The genre (if we can call it that) is definitely having a moment right now. There’s even a hashtag on Instagram- #tinypeopleinbigplaces– with nearly 80,000 posts. In the wrong hands, it can seem cheap, even trite, but there’s one reason it isn’t going away: when done well, there’s nothing like it.

In defense of “Little person, big landscape!” we’ve pulled together this exhibition of breathtaking images from the Offset collection. Taking us on a journey from Italy to Jordan, Bolivia to Iceland, these pictures take a well-known trope and turn it into something more.

Exploring the Vast Beauty of Western Mongolia

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John Feely’s The Outsider is a record of the artist’s time spent in Western Mongolia. A place chosen for its remoteness, vast size and traditional culture, Feely selected a town, and with little plan or particular agenda, made travel arrangements. Without a language in common, relationships were forged silently, the expansive drama of the Mongolian landscape serving as a backdrop for the minutiae and tenderness of human relationships.

Mystery and Magic In the World’s Swimming Holes (Sponsored)

A women cools down in a river.

Appalachian Trail, Connecticut © Aurora Photos / Offset

A swimmer wades in the water of a sea cave in Sunset Cliffs in San Diego, California.

Sea cave, Sunset Cliffs, San Diego, California © Robert Benson / Aurora Photos / Offset

There’s something special about swimming holes. They’re private, secret, and mysterious in a way that borders on the clandestine. A telling entry from Urban Dictionary defines “swimming hole” as the following: “A natural body of water used by all the cool kids in a given area. Uncool kids aren’t welcome there.”

Whoever penned that humorous description was onto something. Do a quick internet search of swimming holes around the world, and you’ll see the ones that appeal the most to travelers are those that are hidden from preying eyes. The ancient Hawaiians understood it. The Queen’s Bath in Kauai was for many years the sole territory of the royals, who were thought to have been born from a divine and sacred line. The allure of swimming holes lies in part in their exclusivity.

It’s easy to see why swimming holes are among the most coveted places on earth. Some of them are so bewitching they look like they’re from an entirely different planet. In Havasu Falls, for instance, the water is rich with magnesium and calcium carbonate, which set it aglow with an uncanny turquoise tinge. At Wadi Shab mountain ravine in Oman, the nearby date and banana trees make the hot air as fragrant as the deep green waters are beautiful. Others were carved from igneous rock formations, forged from hot lava.

We combed through Offset’s collection of work by international photographers to find the most exquisite depictions of the world’s swimming holes, from Italy to California, Iceland to Puerto Rico. Some are well-known, and others are a bit more low-key and hidden. At the risk of exposing all their secrets, we present them here, for your enjoyment.

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