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Posts tagged: travel photography

Photos Examine the Impact of Rapid Development on Nomadic Life in Mongolia

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Mongolia is a country divided by two kinds of people. There are those who retain a traditional nomadic lifestyle and those who strive for a more modern life. Photographer Michele Palazzi’s Black Gold Hotel is a long term project about the impact of modernization in Mongolia.

Photographer Traverses the Frozen Wilderness, Comes Back with Ethereal, Dreamlike Images

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For Alaskan photographer Acacia Johnson, traversing the Far North signifies a homecoming, a return to the curiosity and awe she felt as a young child for the icy wilderness. For Polaris, named for the North Star, the photographer camps and hikes across Alaska and Iceland, chasing down the elusive threads of belonging that bind her to the inhospitable terrain.

Call for Submissions: Photos of Summer Vacation

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© Alberto Bernasconi / Offset

Summer vacation is one of the fundamentally joyous facts of life, the birthplace of the memories and daydreams that keep us pushing through the grind of the winter months. For people of all ages, sunny getaways promise the carefree bliss of childhood, a few cherished weeks or days filled with adventures and picnics, sightseeing and sunbathing. Because we spend so much of our time fantasizing about summer and precious little time actually relishing it, the photographs snapped on these trips are often as valuable as the trips themselves, reminding us of sleepy mornings in exotic locales long after we have departed. For our next group show, we’re looking for your summer vacation photos.

Our judge for this group show will be April Jenkins, Photo Editor for Offset, a new collection of high-end stock photography and illustration from artist around the globe. The winning photographer will receive a GoPro Hero4 Black. All submitting photographers will be considered to join Offset’s curated collection of award-winning and high end photography. Selected photos will run on the Feature Shoot website and be promoted through our social media channels. Copyright remains with the photographer.

To submit, email up to five images (620 pixels wide on the shortest side, saved for web, no borders or watermarks) titled with your name and the number of the image (ex: yourname_01.jpg) to fsgroupshow (at) gmail (dot) com with “Summer Vacation” in the subject line. Please include your full name, website and image captions detailing the locations of the photographs within the body of the email.

The deadline for submissions is June 30, 2015.

Curious about joining offset? Check out this video in which some of our favorite photographers discuss what it means to be represented by Offset.

Offset is a category partner on Feature Shoot.

A Photographers Journey to Find ‘Home’ in China

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During Hungarian photographer Bence Bakonyi‘s one year stay in China, he sought out to find “home” in a world completely unknown and foreign to him. Unable to speak the language, and with no assistance, it was nearly impossible to communicate with the local people. As a result, he refrained from photographing people and instead focused his creative energy on capturing the environment. Segue is a photographic journey of a foreign space, as depicted through landscapes and inanimate objects.

Rhythmic Photos of Tourists Swarming Across the Gobi Desert

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Budapest-based photographer Bence Bakonyi knew he would visit the town of Dunhuang the moment he caught a glimpse of it on the surface of postcard. Positioned in western China on the shores of the seemingly infinite Gobi Desert, the terrain cried out to him to be traversed, as it had thousands of years previously by the merchants and nomadic peoples of the ancient Silk Road.

Beguiling Photos Capture the Beauty of Antarctica’s Icebergs

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In Antarctica, says London-based photographer Anna Vlasova, snow comes in more shades than white, coloring ancient icebergs in pastel shades of blue and green. Seventy percent of the planet’s water is held precariously within these floating monoliths, bodies of frozen fluid that can tower as high as our lofty skyscrapers and extend well below sea level, where they are blanketed in a fuzzy layer of ice algae. For The Character of Snow, Vlasova tells the story of these enigmatical and volatile bodies, glancing back thousands of years to a time when they roamed the seas, uninhibited and unbroken by the will of mankind.

These 40 Hiking Photos From Around the World Will Give You Serious Wanderlust

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Hiking at a glacial ice cave at Skaftafell National Park, Iceland © Peter Adams / Offset

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Backpacker in autumn Nire shrubs in Los Glaciares National Park, Patagonia, Argentina © Johnathan Ampersand Esper / Aurora Photos / Offset

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Couple hiking on the island of Oahu, Hawaii © Julian Walter / Offset

Hiking and art-making might seem at first like unrelated pastimes, but a small glimpse through history will reveal the two recreations are often inextricably intertwined. Hiking for sport came into prominence in the late 1700s, born in large part from the Romanticism that permeated contemporary art movements. As European cities became increasingly industrial, creative minds flocked to the hilly countryside in hopes of reconnecting with the sublime in nature. Painters like German-born Caspar David Friedrich frequently pictured lone hikers dwarfed by the divine and sprawling landscape that surrounded them, rendering moments in which mankind was at once humbled and exalted by the powers of the wilderness.

10 Enviable Infinity Pools Photographed Around the World

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Infinity pool at the Amalfi coast, Italy © Chris Caldicott / Offset

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Infinity pool at Grootberg Plateau, Namibia © Chris Schmid / Aurora Photos / Offset

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Hotel infinity pool in Singapore © Peter Adams / Offset

Since its arrival at the Palace of Versailles in the 17th century, the infinity pool has become the ultimate symbol of opulence and luxury. Also known as a “disappearing edge” pool, the pool may be functional (for swimming) or entirely decorative. Infinity pools are constructed with one or more of its walls rise only to the level of the water and not above it, giving the optical illusion that its waters extend into the horizon ad infinatum. The visual trickery of such a pool relies on meticulous engineering, and for this reason, they are built only in grand hotels and resorts and the most extravagant of homes.

15 Irresistible Photos of Dogs in Cars

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© Tetra Images / Offset

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© Ashley Jennett / Offset

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© Julia Christe / fStop / Offset

For humans, a car ride is a means to an end, a way of getting from Point A to Point B. For dogs, however, the trip itself is the destination, a curious adventure wherein wonder and intrigue linger at every turn. For our canine friends, whether they be wide-eyed goofballs or a bashful pups, each road brings with it a new set of smells to inhale, each pit stop a chance for some extra snuggles and wags. In the end, the best part of a dog’s journey isn’t the sights and sounds or even the ecstatic feeling of ears flopping in the wind, but the chance to be on board, to be included, and to serve as our furry co-pilots.

Photographs Capture the Worldwide Phenomenon Known as ‘Dark Tourism’

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The collapsed Xuankou school buildings, part of a tour of ruins from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, Sichuan, China.

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Genocide memorial site at Ntarama, Rwanda.

For I Was Here, Paris-based photographer Ambroise Tézenas delves the practice of grief tourism (or dark tourism), a global phenomenon whereby sightseers are drawn to the scenes of mass tragedies, from the sites of genocides to those of natural disasters. Shedding the privileges normally afforded to members of the press, he chose to embark on the journey just as his fellow travelers did, paying for his own guided tours and uncovering in the process a network of sinister locales, bound together by the rapt attention they inspire in day-trippers young and old.