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Posts tagged: still life photography

The Art of Food in 60 Photos (Sponsored)

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Heaven © Andreas Joshua Carver (@theaphrodisiackitchen)

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Watermelon rinds © Aliza Eliazarov (@aliza_eliazarov)

Whether we’re talking about Dutch still life painting or fast food advertisements, art and imagery has always been intimately connected to what we eat. For our latest group, show we invited you to submit photographs that show the wonderful and strange relationship between food and art. Curated by Alison Zavos, Editor-in-Chief at Feature Shoot, the resulting collection of winning images expresses just how far that theme can be stretched; we received mostly gorgeous confections, a few grotesque concoctions, and everything in between.

Spellbinding Photos of Meals from Classic Books

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“Alice’s adventures in Wonderland” and “Through the Looking-glass” (Lewis Carroll)

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“The Metamorphosis” (Franz Kafka)

Paris photographer Charles Roux describes his boyhood self as “a lonely kid that filled his life – and his voids- with literary fiction.” In this way, you could say Fictitious Feasts began in the artist’s early years, when he was curled up with a book, turning the pages and imagining the worlds inside them.

Indulge in the Gourmet Version of Your Favorite Junk Foods (Sponsored)

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Balls of fried potatoes with lemon, rosemary and yogurt sauce © Zaira Zarotti / Offset

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Five hot dogs with different garnishes © Con Poulos / Offset

The Oxford English Dictionary defines the term “junk food” as “Food that has low nutritional value, typically produced in the form of packaged snacks needing little or no preparation.” Going by this definition, junk food isn’t only for people who are unhealthy; it’s also for lazy people. But is there such a thing as decadent, meticulously prepared junk food? Can junk food be, well, sophisticated?

In honor of National Junk Food Day, we wanted to challenge the “junk food” stigma, even if that means taking on the Oxford University Press. As evidence for our case, we combed through the high-end, editorial food photography in the Offset collection and pulled together our favorites. For your consumption, we present pizza with peas and prosciutto, deep fried eggs and gelato sandwiches.

Candid Photos of ‘Desktop Dining’ in the American Workplace

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Michael Brennan, Managing director in high-yield bond sales, Citigroup, New York. Pizza and chicken soup.

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Monica Vaccari, Community manager of social media, Audible, Newark. Chicken-and-andouille soup; beignets for dessert.

“The way people eat at work is pretty sad,” the disillusioned ethnographer June Jo Lee told journalist Malia Wollan of The New York Times Magazine. For the story Failure to Lunch: The lamentable rise of desktop dining, the magazine teamed up with New York City-based photographer Brian Finke to conduct a survey of the state of munching in American offices.

Behind-the-Scenes in the Life of a Dominatrix

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The key to BDSM, says New York City-based photographer Samir Abady, is trust. He’s witnessed the profound intimacy that enfolds inside the dungeon of a dominatrix; there have been moments so delicate that just the click of the shutter could break the spell. Kink is the photographer’s ongoing chronicle of women who venture into the professional world of BDSM, the submissives who confide in them, and the day-to-day goings on of their otherwise mundane—or, as Abady would say, “vanilla”—lives.

The Beautiful and Grotesque Collide in Haunting Still Lifes

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On her daily drive to work, New Jersey-based photographer Kimberly Witham encounters a sprinkling of bodies left to decompose on the side of the road. While other passersby avert their eyes and plow forwards, she makes a detour, gathering the tiny squirrels, raccoons, and birds whose fragile forms have been stuck down by collisions with traffic. In the privacy of her studio, she constructs austere still lifes in which their remains are commingled with succulent, ripe fruit.

One Woman’s Intensely Intimate Photos of Motherhood

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Nursing and peeing, Cincinnati, Ohio, 2014 © Anna Ogier-Bloomer

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Scratches from breastfeeding at nine months, 2014 © Anna Ogier-Bloome

“She’s the flesh of my flesh,” says New York City-based photographer Anna Ogier-Bloomer of her daughter Violet, whose first two and a half years she’s feverishly chronicled between breast-feedings, catnaps, and sleepy revelations.

These Minimal Paddle Pops Will Make You Miss Being a Kid

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“We had a huge freezer in our family home filled with all sorts of paddle pops,” says Sydney-based photographer Simone Rosenbauer of summer months as a child. She remembers the instant the lid was opened, a burst of cold air signaling a tasty treat and momentary relief from the scorching sun.

A Fearless Look at What Women Wore When They Were Sexually Assaulted

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Well, What Were You Wearing? is Philadelphia-based photographer Katherine Cambareri’s cri de coeur on behalf of survivors of sexual assault who have been failed by the authorities meant to protect them. Using only the clothing they happened to have on when they were attacked, the photographer tells the stories of women who, after having been raped, molested, or otherwise violated, have been forced to endure interrogations and accusations associated with victim-blaming.

A Photographer Reflects on Her Loss After 11 Miscarriages

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Lost: Jane

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Lost: Tommy

“Last July, after helping a friend through a painful loss I reflected on my own personal experience. These thoughts propelled me to take down the big white box in my closet which safeguards the mementos of my lost babies. It had been quite a while since I last took each item out and as I laid them out on my bed I felt their story needed to be documented.”

San Francisco-based photographer Dianne Yudelson’s sorrow was repressed by a socially accepted code of silence which, in her words, deems miscarriage grief unreasonable. She locked it away, but each loss was commemorated by the preservation of the pregnancy test, sonogram and a few items which evoked memories.

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