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Posts tagged: still life photography

Gripping Photos Document the Uncertainty of Families Living Out of a Florida Motel

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Tyrone Washington holds his 3-month-old daughter Ritcheousness in the motel room that he shared with his family in Orlando.

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John Cruz takes a swim in the pool at the Remington motel where his family is temporarily staying. They were evicted from their apartment when their car broke down and they were unable to get to work.

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Preziyana Presy, 8, who cannot afford dance lessons, dances ballet in the motel room she shares with her four brothers and sisters, mother and father in Northern Orlando.

Last year, Rome-based photographers Nadia Shira Cohen and Paulo Siqueira, along with their young child Rafa, moved for a period of two weeks into a room at the Remington Inn near Orlando to tell the stories of some of the five hundred families living out of Florida motels, sometimes moving between rentals and the adjacent woods or homeless shelters.

Photographer Relishes the Messiness of Childhood in Raw, Emotional Images of Her Family

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New York-based photographer Andi Schreiber first began photographing her family, she suggests, out of some innate feeling of urgency and desperation. She describes the period in which her eldest son was a toddler and her youngest an infant as one that was both sweet and solitary; homebound, she thirsted for familiar moments that slipped ever so slightly into the realm of the uncanny, instants wherein the ordinary became curious and strange.

Photographer Salvages Expired Photographic Paper for ‘The After Life of Things’

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San Francisco-based photographer David Wolf has no interest in discovering the next big thing; instead, he’s drawn to the forsaken, to the has-beens and the rejects of decades past. For The After Life of Things, Wolf documents items that have been discarded on street corners and roadsides, ultimately printing their effigies on expired and discontinued photographic paper.

The Story of One Photographer Who Tracked Down Her Birth Mom After 22 Years Apart

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“My whole life, I have been curious,” says Massachusetts-based photographer Ashley Comer of her birth mother Sheila, to whom she reached out this winter after twenty-two years apart. Meeting Sheila documents the friendship they forged over a series of four weekends.

13 Different Approaches to Sculptural Food Photography

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Four eggs stacked on a pile of powder © Virginie Gosselin / Offset

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Black plums in a jar © Zaira Zarotti / Offset

From the pomegranates of Caravaggio and the pears of Paul Cezanne to the oysters of Edouard Manet, sculptural arrays of food have claimed their place in the history of the still-life. Delightful and surprising compositions take us from the realm of ordinary meals and into the world of fantastical feasts, but in photography, constructing these delectable balancing acts can prove a bit more difficult than it might be with a paintbrush. For our latest Offset group show, we’ve pulled together a collection of outstanding sculptural food photographs that whet our aesthetic appetites.

Photo Series Explores The Remnants of Diseases After Surgical Procedures

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Gallstone #1, pigment print, 60 cm x 40 cm. From the series Removals 2011-2013 by Maija Tammi.

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Breast cancer (whole breast removed) #1, pigment print, 60 cm x 40 cm. From the series Removals 2011-2013 by Maija Tammi.

Many understand disease through the person it inflicts. However, Maija Tammi’s Removals invites viewers to reexamine disease, its visual stereotypes, and the interpretation of diseases today. “They [people] would like to think that the border of our body is fixed and stable. When this border is challenged people often feel uncomfortable.” “Removals” explores the borderlines of art and spectatorship by displaying disease as still life.

A Coffee-Lover’s Fantasy: 16 Java-Infused Confections That Will Give You Serious Cravings

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Coffee-flavored popsicles © Stephen DeVries / Offset

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Chocolate espresso cake © Nicole Branan / Offset

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Caramel lattes © Matt Armendariz / Offset

According to recent studies, more than half of the American population consumes coffee every single day, but if we go back centuries, the origin of the brewed treat is shrouded in mystery and legend. One Islamic origin myth posits that more than six hundred years ago, an exiled mystic by the name of Sheikh Omar came across the plant in Yemen, discovering soon after that when eaten, it was quite bitter to the taste and yet possessed of rejuvenating powers. When it reached Europe, coffee was allegedly referred to as “the bitter invention of Satan” until the pope himself attested its invigorating properties and ambrosial taste. Luckily for us, we now know how to embrace the rich flavors of coffee and to bring out its subtler, sweeter notes through sophisticated preparation.

Fascinating Portraits Document the Devotees of Father Divine, an African American Spiritual Leader

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15 Minutes Until the Banquet Is Rung

Love Child with Father and Mother Divine.Kristin Bedford

Love Child with Father and Mother Divine

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Father’s Estate, “The Mountain of the House of the Lord”

Meet the devotees of the “The International Peace Mission Movement,” a group of followers to Father Divine, a figure they believe to be God. The movement began in Harlem during the 1930s and attracted thousands of followers, states Kristin Bedford, who spent five weeks living with and photographing the community of Father Divine in an estate outside of Philadelphia. The movement’s abiding faith and dedication despite their dwindling numbers and aging followers captivated her attention to document their traditions. Bedford describes, “My visit felt like a special intersection of time, history, and devotion. I had the chance to experience their traditions before they fade away. With these photographs I hope to offer glimpses of a mysterious and enduring faith.”

Juergen Teller’s Food Photography for the Hotel Il Pellicano

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Food No.15, Hotel Il Pellicano 2010

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Food No.113, Hotel Il Pellicano 2010

German photographer Juergen Teller first met Marie-Louise Sciò, creative director at Hotel Il Pellicano, through fashion house heiress Margherita Missoni, and so began a friendship and collaboration that was to play out along the coast on Tuscany. Set along a cliff hanging above the Tyrrhenian Sea, Hotel Il Pellicano has for fifty years been a treasured sanctuary of the elite, from royals and heirs to designers like Emilio Pucci, Hollywood icons like Sophie Loren, Charlie Chaplin, and Douglas Fairbanks Jr. to literary figures like Angelika Taschen. For the cookbook Eating at Hotel Il Pellicano, Teller photographed the creations dreamt up in the retreat’s kitchen by chef Antonio Guida, who won the restaurant two Michelin stars throughout his time there.

Witty, Mysterious Photos Mix Fact and Fiction, Past and Present

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Lying Still, Birthe Piontek’s series of found and staged self-portraits and set ups, quivers with an air of threat, transformation, and mystery. In the bright melancholy light of Piontek’s rooms, visual evidence accrues. Red string hangs on the wall in a pelvic triangle. A woman writhes in the sky. Dark berries obscure a woman’s mons pubis. Bedsheets hang from empty windows. A woman’s back is alarmingly bruised in the bold pattern of a Marimekko print. We feel a loud hush, something like the theatrical quiet before or after a crisis. Or maybe it’s the beat before a punch line.