Menu

Posts tagged: nature photography

Photographer Michael Benson Talks Astronomy, Infinity, and Existential Crises

Michael_Benson_12

The Ultraviolet Sun, Trace, July 30, 1999 [2010]

Michael_Benson_01

Enceladus Geysers Water into Space, Cassini, December, 25, 2009 [2012]

I don’t have to say how much I love Michael Benson’s work. These photographs were pulled together from NASA and ESA space probes. They are composites of two or more black-and-white images that have been mosaicked through Benson’s own computer work. They are pictures of how we see the universe, not the universe itself. What I see in them is a hunger for beauty in an infinity of space. That’s the greatest mystery. No matter how violent and strange the universe, at the heart of us is beauty.

Photographer Jessica Hines Discovers Beauty on the Surface of a Swamp

Spirit-Stories-07

Spirit-Stories-05

Spirit-Stories-02

On a particularly sunny day in the early weeks of January, photographer Jessica Hines noticed something peculiar happening in the swamp near her house. Due to the suns reflection on the water and a natural combination of plant oil and pollen, an intense spectrum of rainbow colors appeared on the entire surface. After photographing the colored swamp from the waters edge and loving what she captured, Hines purchased a pair of chest-high waders the very next day so she could get an even closer look. The result is an abstract and otherworldly photo series titled Spirit Stories.

Sweet and Subtle Photos of Twigs, Leaves and Branches Frozen in Ice

Anna_Williams_6073

© Anna Williams / Offset

Anna_Williams_6066

© Anna Williams / Offset

In a striking editorial series of still lifes, acclaimed New York-based photographer Anna Williams captures natural elements—leaves, branches, and twigs—caught within blocks of ice.

Astonishing Photos of an Extremely Rare Flipped Iceberg

Alex_Cornell_03

Alex_Cornell_02

Alex_Cornell_01

When San Francisco-based photographer Alex Cornell visited Antarctica with his sister and mother, he could not have predicted that –amidst the majestic sights of penguins and seals– he would encounter the singular and vastly unusual phenomenon known as a flipped iceberg. Surrounded by its fellow icy mammoths, the overturned structure revealed the glossy, transparent blue crystals that hide beneath the familiar snowy surface.

Photographer Christopher Payne Talks to Us About Industrial Ruins, Gothic Castles, and What Goes Into Building a Piano

Chris_Payne

Christopher Payne‘s Squarespace website

Christopher-Payne_Asylum_1

Buffalo State Hospital, Buffalo, New York

With a background in architecture, New York City-based photographer Christopher Payne is drawn to abandoned buildings, neglected structures that jointly disclose forgotten chapters of America’s storied past.

Payne’s fascination with the antiquated and disused began with his documentation of the city’s outmoded manual subway systems, to which he was afforded unlimited access. In recent years, he has chronicled spaces ranging from the pervasive and once densely populated asylums of the 1800s and early 1900s to the eroded landscape of North Brother Island, where in the latter part of the 1800s, citizens afflicted with infectious diseases were quarantined from the remainder of the city. In his shadowy, evocative frames, America’s past becomes a mythical place, one that is both acutely fantastical and undeniably real. Here, the photographer illuminates the mysterious and haunting remnants of our shared history, playing the dual part of the detective and the preservationist.

In his more recent projects, Payne has turned his gaze towards contemporary America by capturing the inner workings of Astoria’s historic Steinway piano factory as well as New England’s older textile mills as compared with North and South Carolina’s more state-of-the-art factories. We spoke with the artist about his interest in both deserted and sustained industries and why he chose Squarespace to build his site.

Magical Jellyfish Photographed by Marine Biologist Alexander Semenov

Alexander_Semenov_137618

© Alexander Semenov / Offset

Alexander_Semenov_137604

© Alexander Semenov / Offset

Alexander_Semenov_137611

© Alexander Semenov / Offset

Moscow-based photographer and marine biologist Alexander Semenov is willing to do anything to get the perfect shot, including diving into the icy depths of the White Sea that runs along the northwestern coast of Russia.

An Intimate Look at Kindred Spirits Evie Lou and Laura Jane (NSFW)

NMcCleaf_01

NMcCleaf_02

Evie Lou and Laura Jane looks at the complex and intimate relationship between photographer Noelle McCleaf’s mother and her best friend. It’s a story of two women who describe themselves as “alike with an honored difference,” who together signify an under-represented part of American society: aging women full of charisma, vibrant energy, with an understanding of the Earth and our place within it.

Mesmerizing Environmental Sculptures in Nature by Martin Hill

Martin Hill

Martin Hill

I imagine it is difficult to make environmental art of this type without being compared to Andy Goldsworthy. However, I believe Martin Hill’s work is quite unique. Since 1992 and often in collaboration with Philippa Jones, New Zealand-based Hill has focused his art practice on “making environmental sculptures in nature that return to nature.”

Baby Wild Boar in the Snow

Fotofeeling_38211

© Fotofeeling / Westend61 / Offset

To see more of Fotofeeling’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

10 Devastatingly Beautiful Photographs from Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

Michael_Nichols

The last great picture Nick set out to create an archetypal image that would express both the essence of lions and how we visualize them – a picture of a time past, before lions were under such threat. Here, the five females of the Vumbi pride – a ‘formidable and spectacularly cooperative team’ – lie at rest with their cubs on a kopje (a rocky outcrop), in Tanzania’s Serengeti National Park. Nick got to know and love the Vumbi pride. A few months later, he heard that it had ventured into land beyond the park and that three females had been killed. © Michael ‘Nick’ Nichols / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

Bruno_D'Amicis

The price they pay A teenager from a village in southern Tunisia offers to sell a three-month-old fennec fox, one of a litter of pups he dug out of their den in the Sahara Desert. Catching or killing wild fennec foxes is illegal in Tunisia but widespread. Bruno discovered widespread wildlife exploitation, including hunting and capture for commercial trade and traditional medicine. He also discovered that the causes and therefore the solutions are complex and include high unemployment, poor education, lack of enforcement of conservation laws, ignorant tourists and tour companies, habitat destruction and the socio-political legacy of the ‘Arab Spring’ revolts. But Bruno is convinced that change is possible – that tourism has a part to play and that thought-provoking images can help raise awareness among tourists as well as highlight what’s happening to the fragile Sahara Desert environment. © Bruno D’Amicis / Wildlife Photographer of the Year 2014

As our human race continues to encroach upon and threaten the natural world that surrounds us, few genres carry as much weight as wildlife photography, and for 50 years, the Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition at London’s Natural History Museum has maintained its position as a leading international platform for imagery that transforms and enriches our perceptions of those creatures with whom we share our planet.