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Posts tagged: sports photography

Photos of Burnout Competitions in Australia

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

For the past six years I have been photographing the sub-culture of burnout competitions in Australia. The guys and girls who compete in the various competitions across Australia are a passionate bunch. As a photographer I enjoy the visual feast of a superb and powerful car on the black of the burnout pad juxtaposed against the softness of the tire smoke. In reality a burnout is extremely loud and aggressive but in the photos there is a sense of calm… poetic in a way.

Born in New Zealand, raised in Sydney, Simon Davidson discovered photography at the age of 25. His early years of photography were spent in the darkroom developing film and printing black and white images. Moving to New York in the late nineties to assist fashion photographers, Davidson returned to Australia in the new millennium to further assist before dabbling in fashion photography. A chance excursion to a street drag racing meet one cold winter evening changed the direction of his work, and he has been photographing Australian custom car culture as a personal endeavour for the last decade. This project has allowed him a healthy editorial career in the Australian modified and custom V8 car scene, leading to an advertising career. While the cars are central to the project, the people, and the characters are a rich source of subject.

burnout competition Australia Simon-Davidson photography

Stunning Photographs of Dancers and Contemporary Circus Performers

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

Bertil Nilsson was born in Sweden and currently lives and works in London, U.K. He creates imagery for commercial and editorial clients alongside his artistic practice and personal projects. In his work, which takes inspiration from movement and the human form, he collaborates extensively with dancers and contemporary circus performers.

Nilsson’s first book, Undisclosed: Images of the Contemporary Circus Artist, was published in September 2011.

dancers Bertil-Nilsson photography

Graphic Images of Empty Sports Courts

Elliott-Wilcox photography

Courts examines representations of the enclosed spaces of sports courts. In photographing the empty courts, absent of the fast paced action we are so familiar with, these environments reveal themselves in a new light. The camera shows details that the viewer can see closely, revealing many subtleties that usually go unnoticed. The vivid stains, ball marks, blood and scratches force the viewer to focus on these details rather than just the court.

Elliott Wilcox is a London based, British photographer who recently graduated from the University of Westminster, MA Photographic Studies program. He has exhibited internationally and in the UK, his first major series ‘Courts’ was part of the show ‘PRUNE – Abstracting Reality’ at FOAM Gallery Amsterdam.

Elliott-Wilcox photography

Quirky Photographs of a Fictitious Olympic Team

Oli Kellett Vodkovia photography London Olympics

Oli Kellett is a London-based photographer who earned his degree from St. Martins Art College. He worked at several London ad agencies as an art director before leaving in 2008 to pursue photography full time. His recent project is entitled ‘Team Vodkovia’ and features a digitally-designed team of olympic hopefuls from the fictitious country of Vodkovia.

Hunting Stands Photographed at Night

deer stand hunting stand jesse burke photography

Jesse Burke is a photographer working primarily with themes related to vulnerability and identity, as well as human’s complicated relationship with nature. Burke’s photographs evoke a deep lushness with images of velvet black darkness, blankets of pine needles, blood, love, and sadness. He is drawn to moments where a rupture or wound is physically, emotionally, or metaphorically inflicted. This series of hunting stands is part of a larger body of work entitled Blind. Burke writes:

Blind is an exploration into masculine identity as well as man’s obsession with and innate calling to simultaneously dominate and embrace the natural world. The work explores concepts related to hunting- such as death and power, fragility and vulnerability, identity, mutability and camouflage. I am also interested in the awkward, yet often beautiful and romantic, relationship we share with nature. The images serve largely as evidence of hunting rituals and are meant to evoke a sense of disconnect and strangeness, yet retain a seductive and tender quality.

Photo du jour: Jason Hindley

Bondi-Beach-pool-Jason HindleyPhoto by Jason Hindley

Dramatic Photos of Urban Free Running

free running photos laura-barisonzi

Laura Barisonzi is a NY-based photographer and director of photography shooting sports, lifestyle, and portraits on location. About this series on free running she writes:

The Ballerina Project

ballerina-project-Dane-Shitagi

Dane Shitagi’s photography series, The Ballerina Project, grew from the idea of New York City as a magnet for creativity; each photograph is a collaborative work of dance, fashion design and photography played out against the city’s landscape. Shitagi writes:

Tasmanian Surf Photographer Captures Amazing Waves

Australian surf photography Stuart Gibson Tasmania

Stuart Gibson is a photographer from Tasmania, Australia. His introduction to photography was one of accident, quite literally. A car smash saw him hobbling on crutches and plastered up to a dangerously itchy level, but this forced shore leave proved to be a blessing in disguise as soon as he picked up the camera. Shooting from the beach on a pre-loved Canon film rig, Gibson realized he had found his passion and his true life calling. Today, his images are published and recognized around the world, both in print and pixel.

Australian surf photography Stuart Gibson Tasmania

Australian surf photography Stuart Gibson Tasmania

Rugby players photographed by Amy Elkins

Rugby Yale Amy Elkins photography

Amy Elkins has been shooting some groundbreaking work exploring gender roles and masculine identity. In her latest series, ‘Elegant Violence’ she turns to men’s rugby. Elkins writes: