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Posts tagged: landscape photography

Moving Photos of Restless Souls Who Live on the Open Road

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CSX Yard, Cumberland Maryland, 2014

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Near Amarillo, Texas, 2013

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Quartzsite, Arizona, 2016

“I’m not homeless. I might be houseless, but these freight trains are my home,” Mark confided in photographer Nicholas Syracuse, who has for twenty years been recording the history of those who, like Mark, have behind the comforts of mainstream life for the freedom of the railway.

The Secret World of the Inquisitive Hokkaido Fox

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Romance is in the air. It was the time of day immediately following sunset. I heard a voice. “Wherever you go, I will follow you” the voice says.

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A Wild Fox Chase

For Hokkaido-based photographer Hiroki Inoue, the “living landscape” found in his region is a constant inspiration. Biei, also known as “the town of many hills” is the artist’s preferred shooting location; its undulating hills, vast meadows full of wildflowers and mysterious, seemingly impenetrable forests transport the viewer into this magical, secret world. The elusive fox appears and disappears unexpectedly amidst the vivid flora and rapidly changing climatic conditions, making the photographer’s task all the more challenging, Hiroki elaborates: “I feel that the difficulty of attainment increases the beauty of the fox”. His long-term project the Magical Photos of Hokkaido focuses on the “intellectual beauty” of the fox in its environment.

Photos of The Iconic Route 66 Take Us Back in Time (Sponsored)

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Route 66 Diner on Central Ave, Albuquerque, New Mexico © Julien McRoberts / Offset

Route 66 stretch of highway

Route 66, California © Cavan Images / Offset

Holbrook,Arizona, United States. Route 66.

Fake dinosaurs along Route 66 in Holbrook, Arizona © Julien McRoberts / Offset

“I feel like much of our country has become one big strip mall,” confides American photographer Julien McRoberts, who has spent much of her life traveling the world. But there’s one place that maintains the allure of the old American West: Route 66, the 91-year-old highway running through eight states, from Chicago, Illinois, to Los Angeles, California.

Route 66, the subject of the nations best rhythm and blues songs (Route 66 by Bobby Troupe) and literary classics (The Grapes of Wrath, On The Road), was decommissioned in 1985, 60 years after it opened. In the words of Smithsonian Magazine’s Megan Gambino, the American treasure “is not aging gracefully.” Though some 85% of the road remains drivable, much of the once-flourishing businesses that once lined the iconic highway have packed up and moved along. Places are abandoned; the neon signs have been turned off for the final time.

Still, sentimental souls still cherish the long-forgotten highway. Some motel owners refused to leave their beloved “Mother Road,” and some portions have survived the fall from grace. McRoberts, an Offset photographer, understands the persevering spirit of Route 66 more than most. Over the course of four years, she made the journey across the entire 2,400 miles that once supported the country’s westward migration.

In Defense of the ‘Little Person, Big Landscape’ Instagram Trend (Sponsored)

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Rock spur, Chiesa in Valmalenco, Lombardy, Italy © Dirk Wüstenhagen / Westend61 / Offset

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Sand Dunes, Lencois Maranhenses National Park, Brazil © Ronald Patrick / Offset

Half a year ago, National Geographic photographer Jimmy Chin and writer Grayson Schaffer coined the term “Little person, big landscape!” to describe the kind of picture that appeals to the masses of the Instagram era. We’ve all seen it; a sole figure is dwarfed by a mountain, a forest, a vast expanse of wildflowers or snow. The genre (if we can call it that) is definitely having a moment right now. There’s even a hashtag on Instagram- #tinypeopleinbigplaces– with nearly 80,000 posts. In the wrong hands, it can seem cheap, even trite, but there’s one reason it isn’t going away: when done well, there’s nothing like it.

In defense of “Little person, big landscape!” we’ve pulled together this exhibition of breathtaking images from the Offset collection. Taking us on a journey from Italy to Jordan, Bolivia to Iceland, these pictures take a well-known trope and turn it into something more.

A Wistful Look at Rockaway Beach Before Hurricane Sandy

Kui, February Swell 2005

Kui, February Swell 2005

Kristi Convalescing, 2005

Kristi Convalescing, 2005

In Queens, New York, the Rockaway Beach surfers aren’t deterred by freezing temperatures; come rain or come snow, they inherit the waves. From 2004 to 2011, photographer Susannah Ray documented her people as the braved the treacherous waters of the Atlantic.

Right Coast, her most recent monograph coinciding with an exhibition at The Rockaway Beach Surf Club until August 9th, is her homage to the surf community. The word “right” of course contains two meanings, referring both to a place on the map as well as the loyalty and pride that runs across its shores.

Mystery and Magic In the World’s Swimming Holes (Sponsored)

A women cools down in a river.

Appalachian Trail, Connecticut © Aurora Photos / Offset

A swimmer wades in the water of a sea cave in Sunset Cliffs in San Diego, California.

Sea cave, Sunset Cliffs, San Diego, California © Robert Benson / Aurora Photos / Offset

There’s something special about swimming holes. They’re private, secret, and mysterious in a way that borders on the clandestine. A telling entry from Urban Dictionary defines “swimming hole” as the following: “A natural body of water used by all the cool kids in a given area. Uncool kids aren’t welcome there.”

Whoever penned that humorous description was onto something. Do a quick internet search of swimming holes around the world, and you’ll see the ones that appeal the most to travelers are those that are hidden from preying eyes. The ancient Hawaiians understood it. The Queen’s Bath in Kauai was for many years the sole territory of the royals, who were thought to have been born from a divine and sacred line. The allure of swimming holes lies in part in their exclusivity.

It’s easy to see why swimming holes are among the most coveted places on earth. Some of them are so bewitching they look like they’re from an entirely different planet. In Havasu Falls, for instance, the water is rich with magnesium and calcium carbonate, which set it aglow with an uncanny turquoise tinge. At Wadi Shab mountain ravine in Oman, the nearby date and banana trees make the hot air as fragrant as the deep green waters are beautiful. Others were carved from igneous rock formations, forged from hot lava.

We combed through Offset’s collection of work by international photographers to find the most exquisite depictions of the world’s swimming holes, from Italy to California, Iceland to Puerto Rico. Some are well-known, and others are a bit more low-key and hidden. At the risk of exposing all their secrets, we present them here, for your enjoyment.

These Photos of Fireflies Are Straight From a Fairytale

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Each year, Tivoli, New York photographer Pete Mauney awaits the arrival of the fireflies, and for about three weeks each summer, the bioluminescent insects settle beneath the moonlight around his house on quiet evenings. He shoots almost every night.

Youthful Fantasies on the Beaches of Montauk

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Lilla Kneeling

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Jessica and Kurt

New York City-based photographer Michael Dweck remembers vividly the time he went to Montauk at the age of seventeen. It was 1975, and there was the sand, the surf, and girls who, in his words, “looked, well, like they didn’t belong on Long Island.” Visiting Montauk was like falling in love for the first time a thousand times, and he would return to the beach some thirty years later, publishing his book The End in 2004.

‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest Offers The Chance To Win $15,000 (Sponsored)

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“Rockhopper Penguins Storm the Beach” © Rick Beldegreen, Second Prize Winner 2015

Ansel Adams revealed one of photography’s best kept secrets when he said “bad weather makes for good photography.” It’s true; when everyone else is ducking for cover from an oncoming blizzard or monsoon, the photographers are running in the opposite direction and into the eye of the storm. Weather.com understands this idea better than most, and their annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest, now in its third year, is a testament to the enduring relationship between the elements of nature and the will of mankind.

Secrets from the Isolated Territory of Susta

Collecting firewood. 2014

A woman collecting firewood for fuel.

Disputed land. 2014

“I hadn’t seen any form of images of the land or the people,” says Kathmandu-based photographer Prasiit Sthapit of what motivated him to visit Susta. Though its name flickered in and out of the newspapers—the territory is contested, claimed on one hand by Nepal and on the other by India—he could find very little about the isolated and mysterious area.

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