Menu

Posts tagged: landscape photography

Words & Pictures Collide in Teju Cole’s New Book

Teju Cole, Brienzersee, June 2014.
Archival pigment print, printed 2017.

Description:
I opened my eyes. What lay before me looked like the sound of the alphorn at the beginning of the final movement of Brahms’s First Symphony. This was the sound, this was the sound I saw.

Teju Cole, Zurich, November 2014.
Archival pigment print, printed 2017.
Description:

A length, a loop, a line. Faraway wave seen from the deck of the ship. I think the Annunciation must have happened on a day like this one. Stillness. In the interior, she reads with lowered eyes, unaware of what comes next. A presence made of absence, the crossbar, the cloth, the wound in his side.

The relationship between image and text is one of the most challenging pairings to exist. They demand complete attention and so one must choose: to look or to read—and in what order?

Perhaps it seems deceptively simple: one simply does as they are inclined. Yet regardless of preference, they inform each other, infinitely. When we read, we see the picture in our mind. When we look, we write the words ourselves. Now we are asked to forgo our imagination and focus on the given context.

Yet few can bridge the gap that exists between the linguistic and visual realms, the distinctive forms of intelligence that operate independently and interdependently at the same time. Most often, we simply opt out somewhere along the line, wanting to return to the freedom to imagine for ourselves rather than listen to what we are told.

Submit to the 2017 ‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest for a Chance at $15,000 (Sponsored)

Galactic Rainbow © Michael Trofimov

Only one week left to enter! Submit your work by August 7th for a chance at $15,000 and other prizes!

In the last year, you might have encountered Greg Gulbransen’s photograph of a polar bear in Manitoba, Canada. Fire on Ice was taken during a frigid day, just as the strong sunlight was evaporating the ice. Gulbransen’s fingers froze, and he worried his camera battery wouldn’t survive the cold. It’s a breathtaking photograph, but it’s also a resonant and symbolic one in this era– a moment in time when melting sea ice is threatening polar bear populations around the world. It’s no surprise Fire on Ice took home the $15,000 Grand Prize at the 2016 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest, presented by The Weather Channel and Toyota.

2016 Grand Prize Winner: Fire on Ice © Greg Gulbransen

From now until August 7th, the fourth annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest is open for entries. Jurors will select images based on technical excellence, creativity, and adherence to one of three main themes: nature, adventure, and weather. The “nature” category includes any and all images telling stories about flora, fauna, and landscape; “adventure” images should be about exploring the great outdoors, and of course, “weather” photographs should capture the elements.

Photos of a Strange and Beautiful Australian Mining Town

In 2008, French photographer Antoine Bruy spent a year in Australia. When he returned home, he planned to bring with him more than a hundred rolls of film. All of them were lost. “Since then, I kept thinking of going back, to do something about this place,” the artist says.

Photographer seeks solitude in some of the world’s remotest wildernesses

Nature is beautiful, though also capable of arousing fear in those who have settled in densely populated areas where comfort is found in numbers and light. Many of us have gotten used to a more restrained nature in fields and city parks, a far cry from impenetrable dark forests and wildernesses where only animal cries and running water break the silence. We’ve severed ties with what shaped us.

Photos of a Changing Landscape, Inspired by the Western Meadowlark

In 1994, MTV’s Karen Duffy made the trip to the least-visited state in America, a snow-covered North Dakota, to find answers. When she asked then-governor about his home, he responded, “Well, I think the best reason to visit North Dakota is you can still get lost here.” He paused before adding, “Not necessarily lost on a map, but you can really get lost mentally here.”

It’s twenty-something years later, and Seattle photographer Ian C. Bates has gotten lost many times in North Dakota. He picked the state in part because of its solitude. “It is easy to feel alone there,” he tells us, “I liked that feeling, but it also overcomes you after being there for a long time.”

See the Emerging Photography Awards Exhibition at United Photo Industries

Besan in Gaza, Palestine 2016 © Johanna-Maria Fritz

Water Wheel Falls, Grand Canyon of the Tuolumne River, CA 2014 © Ansley West Rivers

Rocks © Zoe Wetherall

Every year for the last three years, the Feature Shoot Emerging Photography Awards have culminated in an exhibition at United Photo Industries in DUMBO, Brooklyn. This time, UPI Creative Director Sam Barzilay handpicked three winning photographers to exhibit at the gallery: Johanna-Maria Fritz, Ansley West Rivers, and Zoe Wetherall. The Winner Showcase opens Thursday night with an Artist Reception at 6:00 PM, with exhibiting prints made on ChromaLuxe® aluminum at the state-of-the-art dye sublimation printing facility at Ken Allen Studios.

Drugs, Poop, and Harpoon Attacks: One Photographer’s Crazy Life

Rainbow Gathering, Guatemala

When I first wrote about photographer Benoit Paillé last year, it seemed as though he was in a different place every time I emailed him. “I’m always on the move,” he told me. “Okay,” I thought to myself, “I get it. Photographers travel.” Turns out, I hadn’t understood after all. He was being literal. This particular photographer lives on the road. His house is a 21-foot camper van.

Photographer Chris Burkard on Conservation, Fearlessness, and Sony Cameras (Sponsored)

Justin Quintal standing under the northern lights while filming for Under an Arctic Sky. Shot with Sony a7S II with 35mm f1.4 ©Chris Burkard/Massif

Photographer Chris Burkard has navigated frozen waters, survived rugged waves, and walked beaches so remote they don’t have names. He’s smiled his way through harsh blizzards, braved arctic winds, and come face-to-face with some of the wild animals who call this planet their home.

Burkard was only nineteen years old when left his job at the time to become a professional surf photographer, and his connection with water has only become stronger over the years. “My entire life I’ve lived less than a mile from the ocean,” he recently wrote on Instagram, where he has well over two and a half million followers.

But Burkard isn’t your typical surf photographer. “I set out to find the places others had written off as too cold, too remote, and too dangerous to surf,” he told the audience in a TED talk a few years ago. For his book Distant Shores, he documented surfing on six of the seven continents on earth.

His film Under An Arctic Sky tells the story of six surfers who made the journey to Iceland right before the arrival of the worst storm in a quarter-century. They risked everything for a shot at once-in-a-lifetime waves, and with just three hours of sunlight per day, their journey was illuminated by the aurora borealis.

The film is currently touring, and Burkard made time in his packed schedule to tell us a bit about his process and motivations. Below, he shares some of his most memorable stories and insights into the importance of conservation. He also gives us a peek into his camera bag and reveals how he uses Sony mirrorless cameras to make the photographs the Sierra Club once called “too good to be true.”

Edward Burtynsky’s Striking Images of India’s Salt Pans

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky describes the terrain of the Little Rann of Kutch in Gujarat, India, as “scorched,” “cracked,” and “parched.” The Guardian’s Oliver Wainwright compares it to cat litter. Between October and June of every year, the Agariya people live along the salt pans, harvesting salt in temperatures so extreme they must work barefoot.

After Years of Neglect, One Dog Becomes a Photographer’s Muse

Photographer Troy Moth has the life he always dreamt of as a teenager, and he shares it with his rescue dog. Together, he and Nikita the dog have traveled throughout the wilderness of the United States and Canada. They’ve run across the surface of frozen lakes in winter, ridden together in canoes, and trekked through mountains.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get some visual inspiration into your day!