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When Sex Workers Grow Old, This Is Where They Go

Portrait of Norma Angelica, a resident of Casa Xochiquetzal © Bénédicte Desrus

The residents of Casa Xochiquetzal in Mexico City range from the age of fifty-five to eighty-six, and at some point in their lives, they have all been sex workers. It’s a two-story house, with food and medical care provided by the government and public donations.

In exchange for a safe place to live, the women must participate in the daily chores and activities. They attend courses on human rights. Some write poetry; others paint. One does yoga on the patio.

French photographer Bénédicte Desrus has spent nearly eight years documenting life at Casa Xochiquetzal, beginning two years after it was founded by a woman and former sex worker named Carmen Muñoz and a passionate group of intellectuals and activists.

Mother and Daughter Reconnect Through Photography

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When her mother’s health began to deteriorate in 2009, American fine art photographer Sarah C. Butler travelled from Boston to her mother’s Maine home, where they were reunited after a long estrangement. Confronted with a mother she hardly recognized, Butler turned to her camera and began to take photographs which chronicle the turbulent relationship between the two of them, set against the backdrop of her mother’s dilapidated but beautiful home. The project, it turned out, was far more than simply a document of her mother’s life; it became a way to reconnect with her, or in Butler’s words, it opened space for them to have a relationship. The photographs, now compiled into a book called Frozen in Time, manage to capture their relationship in a way that makes them at once universally relatable.

Photographer Captures Feeling of Homesickness in China

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Solastalgia, as opposed to nostalgia, is loosely defined as the distress felt by an individual when their home environment is under assault, or has changed beyond recognition and does not recall their memories. In short, it is the homesickness one experience when one is still “at home”. “When I came across this word I was so curious” says photographer Yangkun Shi, who employed the term as the title of his final project while studying at the London College of Communication (LCC). “There is no Chinese translation, and yet it is what I experience every time I return from studying abroad or in another province. Every time I return I realise my past memories and the currently realities don’t match. China is undergoing a very fast-paced period of development and it’s hard to keep up”.

Loneliness and Hope in Detroit After Dark

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Detroit is under Dave Jordano’s skin. He spent his college years there in the 1970s, but as an adult, he took a 30-plus year intermission from photographing the city. In 2010, three years prior to the Detroit bankruptcy, he returned.

One Photographer’s Whimsical Travels Around the World

Ciragan Palace Kempinski, Istanbul

Ortahisar Kalesi, Turkey

Photographer Ekaterina Mishchenkova, who goes by the name Katia Mi on Instagram, travels fifteen to twenty times each year, and every picture she makes is informed by the architecture, heritage, and language of her surroundings.

Secrets Lingering in the Shadows of Baltimore

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Baltimore photographer Josh Sinn makes pictures inspired by music. It can be a tune that’s stuck in his head or a song that comes on the car radio as the drives through the city on a cold winter evening. When asked why he shoots after dark, the artist responds with a line from Nappy Brown and Ray Charles: “Night time is the right time.”

Memories from an Arkansas Cotton Farm in the 1980s

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Cheryl with Silos, Rotan Switch, Arkansas

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Cully Cooking, Rotan Switch, Arkansas

When she was a girl, photographer Lisa McCord spent summers and holidays at Rotan, her grandparents’ Arkansas cotton farm. Some of her earliest memories are of her nanny Cully’s cooking: black eye peas and fried chicken. She remembers singing and praying at Cully’s church and watching the bandana-clad women who worked in the fields. At dark, after long days of hoeing, they’d gather in big trucks and make their way home.

Dizzying Cityscapes by an Adventurous 20-Year-Old Photographer

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Singapore

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Yik Keat Lee’s favorite photographs are the ones that give him what he calls the “flashback effect.” No matter where in the world he is, he makes pictures in order to fast to moments of adventure and intensity before they slip away. Brief recollections can last forever if he’s there to photograph them.

A glimpse into the little-known world of ski in Iran

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Scattered skiers and a dog are photographed at the Tochal resort in the Alborz Mountains north of Tehran. Iran. December 29, 2014

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Clients and a worker are photographed in the restaurant of a chalet in Tochal, Alborz Mountains, North of Tehran. December 29, 2014

The clichéd image of the Middle East brings to mind an arid desert and dry heat. It does not include snowy mountains, but they do exist in this region, and skiing is a common pastime in Lebanon, Turkey, Israel and Iran. Milanese photographer Gaia Squarci—who has skied from a young age in the European Alps—headed to ski locations just North of Iran’s capital with writer Laurence Cornet, who introduced her to the scene. On the slopes, in the hotels, restaurants and surrounding facilities, the artist recognised a microcosm that offers the viewer a glimpse into Iranian society—“ski became for us a way to get a little closer to understanding some of its dynamics” she writes. Her resulting series Ski in Iran offers the viewer a window onto this microcosm.

66 Enchanted Photos of Snow Around the World (Sponsored)

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Maryland © Anna Smolens (@purplehorsedesigns)

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Landmannalaugar, Iceland © Jessica Cantlin (@feed.my.wanderlust)

For our latest group show, we asked you to submit your best photographs of snow. Curated by Feature Shoot Founder Alison Zavos, the winning collection takes us a tour of winter wonderlands around the globe, from the well-known, like Iceland, Saint Petersburg, or Aspen, Colorado, to the less-traveled, like Himachal Pradesh in India or small-town Pennsylvania.

Robert Frost famously wrote the poem “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” in a matter of minutes. It was also the poem he thought would best stand the test of time. The exposures used to capture these scenes range from a fraction of a second to a few minutes, but like Frost’s words, they capture what is timeless, essential, and beguiling about snow.

The weather forecast here in New York does not indicate a snowfall on Christmas, but somewhere in the world, the ground will indeed blanketed in sparkles.

This group show was sponsored by Squarespace, an online publishing platform designed with photographers in mind. With award-winning design, domains, commerce, hosting, and 24/7 support, Squarespace helps photographers discover more ways to market themselves and expand their business. New subscribers to Squarespace can now use the code “FS15” to receive 10% off their website. Click here to start a free 14-day trial.

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