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Photographer Diana Markosian on the Most Important Photo She’s Ever Taken

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Roza Yevloyeva, mother of 20-year-old suicide bomber Magomed Yevloyev, sits on her son’s bed during an interview at her house in the town of Ali-Yurt, southeast of Ingushetia’s biggest city Nazran, February 16, 2011. Speaking softly through tears in her family’s tiny home in the North Caucasus, Yevloyeva apologized for her son’s suicide bomb attack on Russia’s busiest airport. Yevloyev detonated explosives strapped to his body at Moscow’s Domodedovo airport on Jan. 24, killing 36 people. © Diana Markosian

Diana Markosian: I was introduced to photography through photojournalism — so the first phase of my work was spent shooting news events. In January 2011, a terrorist bomber detonated himself at the busiest airport, killing 36 people. I was there along with a dozen or so photographers, a handful of them working for the same agency as me. We circled each other, and by the end of the night, I had sold one image and made none I was proud of. I was disappointed in myself, but still wanted to cover this story. I decided I would meet the family of the terrorist bomber. I traveled to Chechnya, a two hour flight from Moscow, and drove to their home, which was blocked off given the situation. When I arrived in their village in the North Caucasus, I found myself alone. I met the terrorist’s mother, and interviewed her on her dead son’s bed, speaking softly through tears. The image I made, and the experience behind making it, changed the course of my photography. It helped me realize that I can’t be where everyone else is.

Inside the Austere Lifestyle of Religious Community in Siberia who Follow a ‘Messiah’ as their Spiritual Leader

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Julia Sellmann’s documentary photo project, Ecopolis Tiberkul explores a religion born after the dissolvent of the Soviet Union called The Church of the Last Testament (CLT). Sellmann captures a community of followers living in Siberia who sold their belongings, adapted a lifestyle in wooden houses, and live without modern technology to be close to their Messiah, Sergej Torop. Sellmann states, “Their austere lifestyle is an expression of their faith, so I tried to capture it in my images.” Her title, Ecopolis Tiberkul, alludes to this lifestyle: Eco (ecological/habitat), polis (city) and Tiberkul is a lake located near their Messiah’s abode. Torop, who calls himself Vissarion, founded the Church. According to Sellmann, Vissarion was a former policeman, who concluded that he was the latest reincarnation of Jesus Christ. “He wrote the so-called “Last Testament” to follow the biblical Old Testament and New Testament, joining the fundamental beliefs of various religions.” Today, approximately 4,000 members are willing to build a new utopia.

Photographer Transforms His Kitchen Into a Skatepark for Fruits and Vegetables

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Since childhood, Paris-based photographer Benoit Jammes has held a passion for skateboarding and extreme sports; although throughout the years he has turned his attention towards his artistic pursuits, he has found a way to marry his boyhood passion and his current everyday life with Skitchen, a photographic investigation into the unknown and clandestine adventures of foods.

Your Art Gallery Teams Up with Artist Spencer Tunick to Present Previously Unseen Images (Sponsored) 

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American Morning 1 (125th Street, NYC) 1998, 2015
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In the last decade, photography has become more accessible than ever, and with Your Art Gallery, the art buying experience has never been more democratic. Launched in May 2015, Your Art Gallery is a new kind of online gallery, designed to provide equal support and opportunities to photographers as well as those looking to grow their art collection.

Gripping Photos Document the Uncertainty of Families Living Out of a Florida Motel

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Tyrone Washington holds his 3-month-old daughter Ritcheousness in the motel room that he shared with his family in Orlando.

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John Cruz takes a swim in the pool at the Remington motel where his family is temporarily staying. They were evicted from their apartment when their car broke down and they were unable to get to work.

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Preziyana Presy, 8, who cannot afford dance lessons, dances ballet in the motel room she shares with her four brothers and sisters, mother and father in Northern Orlando.

Last year, Rome-based photographers Nadia Shira Cohen and Paulo Siqueira, along with their young child Rafa, moved for a period of two weeks into a room at the Remington Inn near Orlando to tell the stories of some of the five hundred families living out of Florida motels, sometimes moving between rentals and the adjacent woods or homeless shelters.

Photographer Relishes the Messiness of Childhood in Raw, Emotional Images of Her Family

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New York-based photographer Andi Schreiber first began photographing her family, she suggests, out of some innate feeling of urgency and desperation. She describes the period in which her eldest son was a toddler and her youngest an infant as one that was both sweet and solitary; homebound, she thirsted for familiar moments that slipped ever so slightly into the realm of the uncanny, instants wherein the ordinary became curious and strange.

Photographer Larry Fink on Malcolm X, Human Rights, and Charleston, SC

On June 26th, Feature Shoot hosted the second edition of The BlowUp, a new quarterly event in which we ask a selected group of NYC photographers to each tell the stories behind one of their favorite images. This time, theme was Subcultures, and Larry Fink chose two images from a 1960s Malcolm X rally, that when presented nine days after the 2015 Charleston shooting, carried a great deal of present-day weight. As the audience slipped into silence, he recounted a moment at the Audubon Ballroom shortly after Malcolm X’s historic 1964 speech The Ballot or the Bullet. When a young lady pointed to Fink, the sole white man in the venue, and announced, “Brother Malcolm, I have a bullet for that man back there,” Malcolm gave an astonishing response, one of love instead of hatred. Watch the video above to hear what he said.

The BlowUp is sponsored by Agency Access.

Meet the Kids of LGBTQ Parents

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Hope, raised in New York City by her two dads:
“I knew that there was other structures of families because I would see my friends’ families and my aunts and uncles and I knew that people had something called a mother that I didn’t necessarily have, but I didn’t really think that I was so much in the minority. I wondered about my birth family and my birth mother in particular, but in terms of my own development, I don’t feel like I suffered because of it. I think that my parents did a fantastic job of helping to raise me to be a strong woman, but in terms of that question piece about where did I come from– sometimes I still wonder that, and then other times it just kinda disappears in terms of its importance.”

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Mark, raised in Pennsylvania by his mom and his dad, who came out when he was in college:
“My dad is gay. He’s still really in the coming-out process right now. I had an inclination that my dad was gay from the very beginning of time. I always knew I was queer, which helps. I would see early on in my childhood, my father using the same behaviors to conceal his own femininity that I did, like he would uncross his legs or he would stop talking with his hands.”

Thirteen days before the Supreme Court issued its historic ruling on same-sex marriage, New York City-based photographer Gabriela Herman shared her story, and those of other children of LGBTQ parents, with The New York Times and ultimately, with the world. The Kids, now in its fifth year, is the photographer’s ongoing investigation into the realities that linger, previously under-explored and under-researched, beneath the once-abstract debate around how nationwide legalization, and how being raised by LGBTQ parents, truly affects children.

Photographer Travels Throughout the EU Documenting Picturesque Borderlines between Countries

BORDERLINE, THE FRONTIERS OF PEACE

BORDERLINE, THE FRONTIERS OF PEACE

BORDERLINE, THE FRONTIERS OF PEACE

Nationality can play a large role in personal identity and sense of belonging, but what happens when the bounds of nationality become ambiguous? Valerio Vincenzo’s Borderline – Les frontiers de la paix visibly captures this practically borderless lifestyle.

How (Not) to Get Into Berghain, Europe’s Most Exclusive Club

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Lievwkje wonders why she didn’t get in and is determined to try again next time. Being turned away has only stoked her curiosity about Berghain.

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Pierre from Berlin is about to go to sleep and come back after breakfast on Sunday morning to give it another shot.

To get beyond the front door of the Berghain is a testament that you’ve conquered the Berlin nightlife scene. Often labelled the “best club in the world,” the venue has a strict door policy that is notorious worldwide. For more than a decade, countless hopeful club-goers have wondered what they did wrong. One night last March, photographers Bene Brandhofer and Leif Marcus waited outside the Berghain to capture the faces, and stories, of those turned away at the door.