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The Eerie World of Forgotten Nuclear Missile Bases, in Photos

“I grew up during the Cold War, when the pieces in a political game of chess were nuclear missiles,” Santa Barbara photographer Brett Leigh Dicks writes, “Kids at school were being taught to ‘duck and cover,’ telemovies depicted nuclear holocausts, and people were digging bomb shelters in their backyards.”

Photographer captures loneliness in the crowds of Japanese megacities

In the latter half of the 20th century Japan underwent a period of economic growth that was unprecedented—by the 1960s’ the country’s economy was second only to that of the United States. But this rapid growth came at a price, and in Japanese there’s even a word for the consequences of the so-called Japanese economic miracle. Karoshi can be translated literally as ‘overwork death’; sudden mortality caused by overworking. The term has parallels in other countries such as China and South Korea, cultures which also emphasised material prosperity above all else.

Revealing the Hearts and Minds of 14-Year-Old Girls Living in Brussels, Palestine and Congo

Through her project, I AM 14, that materialised over three years and across three countries, Bénédicte Vanderreydt invites us into the lives of three 14-year-old girls. Fascinated by what transpires about adolescence through their compulsive picture-making for social media, Vanderreydt sets out to investigate what she sees as “a complex set of mirrors in which we no longer know who is looking and who is being looked at.”

Composite portraits born from a sense of loss

There is something unsettling about Portland, Maine based artist Craig Becker’s Scratch. The portraits recall decay, a return of flesh to the earth—there is something primordial about them. They demand the viewer to look away, then look again. Through looking at this series, the artist intends us to explore the darker recesses of our subconscious, collectively and individually.

Photos of Microscopic Landscapes Made of Human Tears

What couldn’t be fixed © Rose-Lynn Fisher

Redemption © Rose-Lynn Fisher

Los Angeles photographer Rose-Lynn Fisher has shot an estimated one thousand images of human tears, collected on approximately two hundred glass slides and viewed through a vintage Zeiss optical microscope. Most of them are hers; while working on The Topography of Tears, she even kept slides in her purse in case she cried while she was out of the horse. One is from a newborn baby, others from her mother and brother.

This Photographer Took Big Risks to Pursue His Dreams (Sponsored)

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When Andrew Kearns first started taking pictures, people told him it was almost impossible to make a living as a photographer. They thought he needed a “safe” career. They were wrong. In early 2015, he took a leap of faith and left his job at Starbucks. His Instagram took off, and soon after that, his dream became a reality.

Since then, he’s taken more risks. In the spring of 2016, he left everything behind to live out of his car and explore the world around him. These days, Kearns is still traveling, shooting sublime landscapes and chronicling his adventures on his popular vlog channel. He’s watched the sun rise and set over some of the most beautiful places on earth, and most recently, he’s hiked Ben Hope in Northern Scotland.

We interviewed Kearns about Instagram stardom, the importance of hard work, and the value of a Squarespace website.

Haunting Photos from the World’s Northernmost Town

“This place is so detached from the rest of the world,” Polish photographer Dominika Gesicka says of the town of Longyearbyen in Svalbard, “You can leave your problems behind.”

Longyearbyen is the world’s northernmost town, with just over 2,000 residents. Gesicka’s first journey to the Norwegian archipelago in 2015 was the first trip she ever took on her own. “Without thinking too much, I bought a ticket and just went there,” the artist tells us.

Hypnotic Photos of a Salt Lake Reflected in Mirrors

Mirror 12, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, Courtesy Hamiltons Gallery, London

Mirror 6, 2017 © Murray Fredericks, Courtesy Hamiltons Gallery, London

Photographer Murray Fredericks has spent weeks alone on Lake Eyre in the Australian Outback. He chose it because of its emptiness. He’s traveled by bicycle over its thick salt crust and waded through puddles of rainwater in search of places so lonely they don’t have names. He’s been photographing this area since 2003.

Salt: Vanity, now on view at Hamiltons Gallery, is Fredericks’s most recent body of work from the sprawling salt lake. After rainfall filled the shallow lake just an inch or so, the photographer hauled pristine, imposing mirrors into the void. He anchored them with sandbags and captured what they saw.

Heartfelt Photos of At-Risk Shelter Dogs (Available for Adoption)

Lady Bell is an energetic and smart girl. She loves to give and receive affection (especially belly rubs). Lady Bell loves to play with toys. If you put out five toys, she will rotate through them and play with each of them as if she has never seen them before. She doesn’t like being cooped up in a kennel. Having another fun loving, active dog to play with is also important. She doesn’t like being an only dog. She is already spayed, microchipped, and up to date on her vaccinations. If you’d like to learn more about Lady Bell or want to meet her, please contact her foster mom at [email protected]

This soft-headed pup is Beeny. Beeny has been in the shelter without a break since February. We had a great time at Landfill Park, and I have come to the conclusion that she must have some French Bulldog in her. She has the French swagger down, and her chin and body shape are quite French. In any case, whatever she is made of, Beeny is all good. She is gentle, walks well on a leash, loves to run in short bursts, and really enjoys affection. Beeny is heartworm positive, but she has $250 in sponsorship. Beeny is available for adoption at the Wake County Animal Center.

Bumpy Capone, aka Frodo

In 2014, North Carolina photographer Mary Shannon Johnstone met a dog named Bumpy Capone at the Wake County Animal Center in Raleigh. He was playful and loving— once, volunteers even found him hiding inside the toy box at doggie playgroup.

Celebrate the Legacy of Irving Penn with “Centennial”

Irving Penn, American, Plainfield, New Jersey, 1917–2009, New York.
Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes
1957, printed February 1985 Platinum-palladium print
Image: 18 5/8 x 18 5/8 in. (47.3 x 47.3 cm.) Sheet: 24 15/16 x 22 in. (63.3 x 55.9 cm.) Mount: 26 x 22 in. (66 x 55.9 cm.) Overall: 26 x 22 in. (66 x 55.9 cm.)
Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation IP .123

Irving Penn, American, Plainfield, New Jersey, 1917–2009, New York.
Three Asaro Mud Men, New Guinea
1970, printed 1976 Platinum-palladium print
Image: 20 1/8 x 19 1/2 in. (51.1 x 49.6    cm.) Sheet: 24 15/16 x 22 1/16 in. (63.3 x 56 cm.) Mount: 26 1/16 x 22 1/16 in. (66.2 x 56 cm.) Overall: 26 1/16 x 22 1/16 in. (66.2 x 56 cm.)
Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation IP .154

“Photography is just the present stage of man’s visual history,” Irving Penn (1917-2009) sagely observed, recognizing the infinite possibilities of the human animal to create technology that would advance our ability to document, represent, and re-envision the world. As a master of the form, Penn understood that the only thing that limits us is imagination.

For seven decades he worked, becoming a master of studio photography with the ability to craft pictures of anything he wished. Here was a man who could transform his very first commission for Jell-o pudding into a resounding success, even though, as Penn realized, it was, “a abstract nothing, it’s just a blob of ectoplasm.”

Yet with that formless glob of goop crafted in a laboratory, Penn was able to entice consumers to buy and serve the product en masse. It’s precisely this ability to transcend the particulars that made Penn a master of whatever form he chose to shoot, be in portraits, fashion, still life, food, nudes, or flowers. He understood that the photograph was an invitation to engage, to gaze upon the world without actually having to interact with it.

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