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A Photo Contest to Benefit Kids of Kathmandu

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© Jami Saunders/Kids of Kathmandu

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© Jami Saunders/Kids of Kathmandu

In partnership with Kids of Kathmandu, Feature Shoot is holding a competition, open to all photographers, around the theme of “Childhood Everyday.” In the vein of our new Instagram account, we’re looking for photographs that capture the experience of growing up around the world. Our two jurors, Feature Shoot Editor-in-Chief Alison Zavos and Jami Saunders, Co-Founder and President of Kids of Kathmandu, will select twelve images to be a part of the Kids of Kathmandu gala and photography auction this October, with all proceeds going to build schools in areas affected by last year’s earthquake. All work will be printed by the experts at Ken Allen Studios, and each of the winners will also receive a Leather Presidio camera strap in Antique Cognac by our sponsors at ONA.

It’s been a little over one year since the April 2015 earthquake hit Nepal, leaving thousands of children without access to a place to learn. Almost five thousand schools were destroyed. In the wake of the disaster, Kids of Kathmandu, in partnership with Asia Friendship Network, built tents to serve as temporary classrooms. They provided school supplies in the hardest hit and remotest villages. Now, they’re building 50 permanent schools, which will collectively serve an estimated 10,000 children.

In the past sixteen years, Asia Friendship Network has introduced more than eighty new schools, working alongside the Nepali Ministry of Education to build affordable facilities and train qualified instructors. The ambitious initiative with Kids of Kathmandu will elevate not only the educational standards of public schools but also the quality of life for thousands of children, who will have a safe place to study and play.

As part of the plan to build 50 schools, Kids of Kathmandu will also work to provide clean water, solar power, electronics, and web access to surrounding communities. They have already broken ground on nine schools and are planning to have them complete by November 2016.

All winning photographers will have their work exhibited at the gala and online on Feature Shoot proper. The submission fee is $15 for one image, $20 for two images, and $30 for five images. All proceeds from both the submissions and print sales will go to Kids of Kathmandu. Submit here.

Please read the Terms & Conditions for the contest here.

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Leather Presidio camera strap in Antique Cognac by ONA

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Old car © Julien McRoberts / Offset

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