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The Thin Line Between Reality and Fiction in TV News

LosAngelesKollar

Los Angeles, United States

CannesKollar

Cannes, France

TV reporters seem to always be in the right place at the right time, ready to tell the world about what’s happening directly from the middle of the unfolding events. Live news is often arresting, giving the audience the impression that the camera is simply baring witness to reality as it is. But often these live reports are a performance and the feeling of being on top of the events is carefully curated. In his subtly absurd photo series TV Anchors, Slovakian photographer Martin Kollar captures what happens before the camera is turned on and the staged feel of the reality behind the reality seen on television.

Sex, Drugs, and Punk Rock: Confessions of a 1980s Girl

4. Love Belly, Huntington Beach, California. 2011

Love Belly, Huntington Beach, California, 2011

February-March 1987
I didn’t know what was expected of me.
I didn’t know what to tell my dad.
How could I give him directions to save me.
I didn’t want to make him mad.
I didn’t want to get into trouble with him.
So I decided not to call him.
That was my last decision.
He decided to kiss me on the couch.
I sat there scared to death.
He decided we should go to “bed”.
I was praying for sleep.
He wore just boxers.
I think I wore a t-shirt.
He decided to kiss me some more. He decided to lay on top of me.
I told him I was still a virgin.

© Deanna Templeton, courtesy the artist and Little Big Man Gallery

In 1985, a teenage girl in Orange County ran away from home. She stayed away for one night and came back to her mother, who gave her a camera “as a coming home present.” Thirty years later, that young woman has grown to become photographer Deanna Templeton, but the camera continues to be the thread that ties her to her past as a passionate, punk-loving adolescent from suburbia.

This Forgotten Hotel in Mozambique Is Home to 1,000 Squatters

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In the mid-20th century, says The Netherlands-based photographer Ferry Verheij, the Grande Hotel promised to bring wealth and prosperity to Beira, Mozambique, then under Portuguese control. Its doors opened in 1955, catering to the richest of the rich—including Hollywood starlets Kim Novak— with more than 100 decadently furnished rooms, an impressive swimming pool, and fine cuisine. The Grande Hotel, however, was too ambitious, too extravagant, and utterly unsustainable. It closed less than a decade after opening.

Revealing the Power and Beauty of Yemeni Women

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Frustrated by the constant questions about her experience as a woman in the Middle East, Yemeni Egyptian American photographer Yumna Al-Arashi wanted to show another side of wearing the hijab in her project Northern Yemen; one that conveys Yemeni women’s power, grace and beauty without showing their skin or face. Framed against the beauty of the country’s dramatic landscape, a new light is cast upon these women who appear as powerful as their surroundings, Yumna elaborates: “Yemeni women are strong, leaders of their home, their families, and their land”.

Beautiful, Life-Affirming Photos of Elderly Dogs

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Chauncey (middle), 12 years old, daughter Sailor Girl (left) and Ready girl (right), 6 years old, Juneau, Alaska

49_A Meg 16 years old Java 14.5 years old Juneau, Alaska

Meg ,16 years old, Java, 14.5 years old, Juneau, Alaska

In 2006, New York City-based photographer Nancy LeVine said goodbye to her two best friends, dogs Lulu and Maxie. She has devoted more than a decade to honoring their legacy, traveling the United States in search of souls like theirs, elderly canines who are living out their golden years with a dignity and warmth that far exceed the aches and pains of old age.

Call for Submissions: The Art of Food

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At the Cai Rang floating market in Vietnam, vendors arrive early in the morning to hang their vegetables for display © Daniel Dreifuss (@punkeykid, @illuminatethisday)

Marcella Hazan, the recently departed Italian food writer, famously said, “Cooking is an art, but you eat it too.” In recent years, photography and food have collided in a big way, from famous photographers who have taken the unlikely route of shooting cookbooks to others who have used food to build full-blown gallery installations. Now, we’re looking for your images capturing the intersection of art and food, whatever that means to you, from food photographed artfully to art made out of food.

This group show will be curated by Alison Zavos, Editor-in-Chief at Feature Shoot. To submit, email up to five images (620 pixels wide on the shortest side, saved for web, no borders or watermarks) titled with your name and the number of the image (ex: yourname_01.jpg) to fsgroupshow (at) gmail (dot) com with “Art of Food” in the subject line. Please include your full name, website and image captions within the body of the email.

You may also submit via Instagram simply by following @featureshoot and posting your images using the hashtag #featureshootfood. Submissions are already rolling in, so act now for the chance to have your image featured on our Instagram.

This show is supported by Squarespace, the intuitive website publishing platform that makes it simple for photographers to build creative and professional sites with their combo of award-winning designs, hosting, domains, and commerce. Selected photos will run on the Feature Shoot website and be promoted through our social media channels. Copyright remains with the photographer.

Deadline for submissions is July 16, 2016.

Squarespace is a Feature Shoot sponsor.

Photos Capture the Side-by-Side Transitions of a Couple in Love

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Relationship, #23 (The Longest Day of the Year), 2011

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Relationship, #33, 2008-2013

There’s a photo on Myspace from 2005, picturing a party in Manhattan. In the crowd, two strangers are dancing. Three years later, those anonymous people would meet and fall in love. From 2008 until 2014, Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst took hundreds more photographs of one another, not as part of a noisy group, but together in the privacy of their own home. Over the course of that time, Drucker, a transgender woman, and Ernst, a transgender man, would transition, side-by-side.

Incredible Stories and Photos from Countries on the US Travel Warnings List (Sponsored)

Documentary travel photography from North Korea.

Two children walking along an empty street in Pyongyang © Aaron Joel Santos / Offset

Aaron Joel Santos: There’s something almost upsettingly benign about traveling in North Korea. It feels set up, like a stage in some very elaborate school play. The costumes and actors and lines and directions are all there, laid out for the people you come across. It’s a Ghost World, there through the fog of a window pane. Hidden behind several layers so you can barely make out what it is you’re looking at. It’s mysterious, of course, but it also plays into its own mysteries perfectly.

It’s almost as if, at times, it knows what travelers want out of it, and it obliges. It’s a strange place, and maybe all the more so because we can’t seem to get a grasp on it. It’s a slippery country. At times brutal and frightening and utterly evil, and in other instances, almost hokey and kitsch. But always with a kind of looming terror. Which is why I photographed it the way I did. Lost in that fog. Trying to depict this idea of ghosts haunting a city. A certain myopia and strangeness, something that couldn’t be quite seen or grasped or believed.

The United States government has a list, updated frequently to include all travel warnings to civilians, advising them on precarious situations in locations around the world. Some countries stay on the list for the blink of an eye; others remain for years. While the government cannot of course forbid us from visiting these countries, the list uses no uncertain terms: “We want you to know the risks of traveling to these places and to strongly consider not going to them at all.”

As of this writing, there are thirty-seven places on the Travel Warnings List. Reasons for issuing a warning range from civil war to limited protection by the US government. The Mali warning makes mention of recent terrorist attacks and criminal activity, and some of the remote areas of Algeria are also listed for potential terrorism and kidnappings.

The Iran Travel Warning cites religious tensions, unfair arrests, and “various elements in Iran that remain hostile to the United States.” Americans are warned against visiting parts of Tunisia along the border with Libya due to fear of terrorism. According to the list, North Korea poses a “serious risk of arrest and long-term detention under North Korea’s system of law enforcement, which imposes unduly harsh sentences, including for actions that in the United States would not be considered crimes.”

Although the government is quick to point out that “tens of thousands of U.S. citizens safely visit Colombia each year for tourism, business, university studies, and volunteer work,” it still makes the list because of crime-related violence. Armed robberies are mentioned in association with Venezuela.

Every one of these countries has a history that goes well beyond a number on the list. We wanted to ask some of our favorite Offset photographers who have spent time in these places to tell us their stories, candid tales about personal experiences. Their memories are their own and no one else’s, and they should by no means be understood to represent something general or universal, but they do illuminate sides of these countries that otherwise would remain invisible.

Yes, some of these stories are scary, but others are breathtakingly beautiful. None are what we expected.

Exploring Ecuador and Mexico Off the Grid

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Chetumal, Quintana Roo, Mexico

Valle del Chotas, Ecuador ,

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Three years ago, Montreal-based photographer Benoit Paillé left everything behind, fitting his entire life inside a 21-foot camper. He’s anchored to nothing and free to explore; he mets strangers along the way, says goodbye, and moves along. Traversing the streets and landscapes of Mexico and Ecuador, he creates uncanny visions of daily life, scenes in which the mundane goings on become electric rituals and rites, thrumming with color.

The 13-Year-Old Pageant Girl Who’s Challenging Racism in Brazil

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Luana, Maysa’s sister, decided she also wants be a model.

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Sunday morning, after buying bread for breakfast.

Maysa is proud of her skin, her beauty, her african hair,” says Brazilian photographer Luisa Dorr of her thirteen-year-old muse and close friend, whom she has documented for the last two years. The photographer remembers vividly meeting the girl, then eleven, at Palacio do Cedro during the Young Miss Brazil pageant. She wore a green dress and dreamt someday of being in the competition herself.

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