If Fairytale Creatures Came to Life, This Is What They’d Look Like


The Four Horses


The Meeting



Photographers Deb Young and Francisco Diaz were both enamored with animals as children, Diaz with his dogs and Young with the cows and chickens raised by her family on the hilly New Zealand landscape.

In that sense, The Wandering Kind is both a personal return to the artists’ early years and a collective homecoming to mankind’s place of origin: the wilderness.

Tender Photos Capture the Loving Souls of Rescued Dogs


Mari © Richard Phibbs


Cosita © Richard Phibbs

Photographer Richard Phibbs met Cosita at Humane Society of New York. She was homeless at the time, but the shelter was probably the safest place she’d ever been. She was discovered tied up to a tree somewhere in Mexico, where she had been abandoned and impregnated twice. She was neglected and sick when she was rescued, but a devoted team nursed back to health.

‘A Thousand Polluted Gardens’ in the Heart of Bangladesh’s Capital


In the heart of Bangladesh’s capital, Dhaka, lies the infamous city of Hazaribagh, a densely populated and deeply polluted land. Lying on the eastern banks of the Buriganga river, Hazaribagh floods its waterways with approximately 22,000 cubic meters of hazardous waste, including the carcinogen – hexavalent chromium, every day. Spread across these 25 acres is Bangladesh’s one billion dollar leather industry, dotted with over 200 leather tanneries, each respectively contributing pollutants to its increasingly lethal layers of air, soil and water.

The Devastating Reality of People Living in Waste


An old woman is washing her hair, with flies all over her body, at Dhapa waste dumping ground, Kolkata, India.


One of many dead dogs found dumped openly on the road in the Dhapa waste dumping ground, Kolkata, India.

For photojournalist Turjoy Chowdhury, Dhapa started off as an anonymous brown spot on the map of Kolkata.

“The first time I visited the place, I remember that from the distance I saw something like a mountain at the horizon,” he says, “It was almost eight to ten stories high.” As he drew nearer, the mountain became a massive pile of trash, over sixty acres of waste onto which 5,372 tons of garbage is dumped daily.

Girl Power, Glitter, and Feminism, in Photos


In the words of her friend Arvida Byström, London photographer Valerie Phillips always shoots “with the nerve of a photographer who just got their first camera.” Her most recent book, Another Girl Another Planet, is a personal collection of treasured pictures made with her many female muses throughout the course of fifteen years, including Byström, who lovingly penned the foreword.

Exploring Korean Heritage Through Intimate Family Portraits



Janice Chung is a Korean-American photographer who was raised in Queens, New York. She was brought up in a large Korean-American community, and notes her influence by the culture: “I learned to show respect for my elders and grew a desire to support my family.” However, her chosen path was different from the accepted narrative of her community: she became an artist.

What Squarespace Template Is Right for You? (Sponsored)

We’ve interviewed dozens of photographers about their choice to use Squarespace to build their own websites. Responses vary from “Squarespace is easy and convenient” to “Squarespace gives me the opportunity to build a website that suits my personal aesthetic,” but the one thing that almost always comes up is the beautiful website templates available to photographers.

10 Photographers Reveal How They Respond to Criticism

Many believe that constructive criticism can be greatly beneficial; we learn from feedback of others and are thus able to better our artistic output. There is however that argument that artists should not allow themselves to be moulded by the opinions of others. Professional photographers are not immune to creative criticism, and yet they continue to produce work. Feature Shoot asked 10 photographers to reveal how they respond to creative criticism.


Image © Kazuma Obara, Japan, 2015 – from the series Exposure

Kazuma Obara
“Three months after starting my project about Chernobyl, there were many opportunities to have portfolio reviews in various countries in Europe. I brought along my handmade dummy book and showed my work and ideas to reviewers. The work was an ongoing project so I just wanted to get feedback about my idea. I met thirty people in total, and literally all reviewers told me something along the lines of “to be honest, this subject ‘Chernobyl’ is going to be really difficult to publish as a photo book. There are plenty of photo books already about chernobyl, it might work for a newspaper or a magazine but not for a book. So many great photographers already did the project from various perspectives and they already became books. Your work has to be really really really unique.” Some professionals even recommended I change the subject.

But changing the subject was not an option. And thanks to these conversations, I tried to present my work in an extremely unique way. This enabled my series Exposure to come first place in the ‘People’ category of the World Press Photo Contest 2016.”

Martin Parr
“I am going to pass on this, as I don’t want to flatter my critics by paying it much attention.”

Capturing a Feeling of Melancholy in Georgia

Georgia, Melancolia

Peasant family in Mirashkani, Georgia

Georgia, Melancolia

Farm girl in Mirashkani

When the Soviet Union dissolved in 1991, Georgia suffered a severe economic downturn which has left over half the population unemployed. Georgia, Melancolia is a series of photographs taken by Zürich-based photographer Christian Bobst, while on assignment for a Swiss NGO. Arriving in Georgia, Bobst was amazed by the palpable sense of melancholy that seemed to permeate the land and people.

Capturing the Buzz of Life in Brasilia’s Central Station



When he moved to Brasilia in 2014, photographer Gustavo Minas couldn’t help but feel alienated. The city felt prone to separate; he didn’t like its open spaces and unwalkable roads, and the way people seemed to always be in their cars made him feel disconnected. The only place where he could feel the buzz of life was Rodoviaria do Plano Piloto – the Central Station of the city. His ongoing series Bus Stop is the result of his need to observe and get closer to others.

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