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Posts by: Ellyn Kail

A Photographer and Her Muse Re-Stage History’s Iconic Photos

A tribute to Diane Arbus, A Young Man in Curlers at Home on West 20th Street, N.Y.C., 1966

In the beginning, Looking for Masters in Ricardo’s Golden Shoes was just a game played by a pair of old friends, the French artist Catherine Balet and the costume designer Ricardo Martinez-Paz, when they decided to replicate a famous portrait of Pablo Picasso by Robert Doisneau. It was a private little theatrical moment, with Martinez-Paz playing the role of Picasso and Balet casting herself as Doisneau.

Quickly, however, Balet says it became a kind of obsession. The two of them have since painstakingly reproduced some of the most recognizable images in photographic history, with the costume designer embodying the essence of the various subjects, spanning ages, genders, and backgrounds— from Avedon’s “beekeeper” to Capa’s “falling soldier.”

Changing the Way the World Sees Africa, in Photos

HUSSEIN (2017)

Montreal-based photographer Yannis Davy Guibinga, who was born and raised in Gabon, recently asked an auditorium of people at the University of Toronto, “Can you believe that in 2017, some people still think Africa’s a country?” Everyone laughed. He smiled, “It’s funny, but it’s true.” Then he looked at the audience seriously. The tone shifted.

At twenty-two, Guibinga is part of a growing movement of young artists reshaping the way the world understands Africa and its diaspora. His voice rises above the din of centuries of misinformation, prejudice, and revised history to tell personal and universal stories about what it means to be part of the continent.

Haunting Photos from a Make-Believe World

No Goodbye

Her eyes once filled with joy
Until he said, ‘Why not a boy?’

She followed in her childlike trance
Waiting for a loving look, or a backward glance.

No man should ever leave,
A little girl who says, ‘Daddy Please’.

Copycat Dolls

Fickle followers of fashion
Flock to the frilly frock and mock,
The very stature that should matter.

Where follies of copycat dollies
Prance pristine with glamorous gleam.

From day to day, with nothing to say.

Gillian Hyland’s photographs aren’t “real” in the strictest sense, but that doesn’t mean they aren’t “true.”

The pictures are based on the artist’s own poems, which are based on real life, but the final results are elaborately staged pieces of theater. She casts her models, chooses the location, selects the wardrobe, and gives mood boards to hair and make-up artists to inspire the final look.

15 Exhibitions, Panels, & Events You Shouldn’t Miss at Photoville 2017

Now in its sixth year, Photoville by United Photo Industries opens Wednesday, September 13th, at Brooklyn Bridge Park. The massive (and free) event will include more than 55 of the signature Photoville gallery exhibitions, all beautifully installed in recycled shipping containers.

As always, your favorite food vendors will return, along with a community book store by Red Hook Editions. Penumbra Foundation will once again be making tintype portraits. There is an abundance of exhibitions, workshops, and panels scheduled this year– and many opportunities to discuss some of the world’s most pressing issues: climate change, immigration, poverty, incarceration.

Whether you’re looking to escape the world’s headlines or confront them headfirst, Photoville 2017 promises to deliver. Here are just a few of the exhibitions and panels we’re most excited to see. Be sure to check out the full line-up here.

The Eerie Phenomenon of Numbers Stations, in Photos

HM01 Spectogram

RAF Akrotiri, Cyprus

No world government has ever confirmed the use of numbers stations, but none have flatly denied it either. The stations date back to the Cold War, perhaps earlier, and many are still transmitting. Often, it’s a string of numbers recited by a computerized female voice— sometimes the voice of a child.

According to the thousands of enthusiasts who monitor them, the broadcasts could be coded messages sent from intelligence agencies to their spies. They cover vast distances, and they’re impossible to decode. When the public asks, government officials and bureaucrats typically respond with something like, “We don’t intend to discuss these stations, if any exist at all.”

For London photographer Lewis Bush, that’s not enough. He’s devoted two years to investigating and locating possible stations. He spoke to some of the dedicated “numbers monitors” who have spent much of their lives scrutinizing the broadcasts. He also studied declassified documents, history books, interviews, and first-person accounts by former agents.

This Photographer Is a Professional Globetrotter (Sponsored)

So far this summer, photographer Rhiannon Taylor has sipped wine on a balcony while looking out over Sydney Harbour Bridge, dined on hot and sour soup in Siem Reap while listening to the sound of singing monks, and visited a TriBeCa penthouse with a rooftop garden.

In the last year alone, she’s traveled throughout Australia, South Africa, Bali, Abu Dhabi, Italy, the US, and more. She’s chronicled these unforgettable trips on her blog, In Bed With, where she takes followers on an international adventure, stopping over in some of the most unique and unconventional hotels, resorts, and lodges on earth.

A Rhiannon Taylor photograph is instantly recognizable. It’s clean and luxurious, and most often, it’s accompanied by travel notes, detailing where she ate, where she slept, where she wandered. Frequent comments on her Instagram include: “So jealous!” “Sounds Heavenly!!” and “This looks like the perfect place to escape!” (exclamation marks included).

When building her blog and her commercial website, Taylor chose Squarespace, a platform that understood her pristine aesthetic and on-the-go lifestyle. We asked the photographer to tell us about her life, her travels, and everything she’s learned along the way.

Call for Submissions: The Print Swap Comes to Black Eye Gallery in Sydney!

Black Eye Gallery

In a digital world, physical photographic prints are precious.

Since Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap earlier this year, it has continued to grow with over 2,500 selected photographers swapping prints with other photographers around the world.

For our second Print Swap exhibition, Alison Zavos, Feature Shoot Editor-in-Chief, and Black Eye Gallery Director and Photographer Tom Evangelidis will be selecting approximately 40 landscape photographs from The Print Swap for an exhibition at Black Eye Gallery in the Darlinghurst neighborhood of Sydney, Australia. Devoted entirely to contemporary photography, Black Eye Gallery represents emerging and established artists. Photographers who have exhibited at Black Eye Gallery include Sandro Miller, Ron Haviv, Robin Schwartz, Nick Brandt, Simon Harsent, Robyn Beeche, and Frank Ockenfels.

Photographers of all genres are invited to submit work. Simply tag your photos #theprintswap on Instagram or email your images (at 620 px wide) to [email protected] As always, submitting to The Print Swap is free, though winners pay one-time fee $40 per image to be included. We cover printing and shipping costs. While The Print Swap is ongoing and there is no deadline to submit images, photographers should apply by October 10, 2017 at 11:59PM EST to be considered for this show.

Only new landscape images submitted between today, September 4th, and October 10th will be considered for the show. Images that have been submitted and chosen for The Print Swap prior to September 4th, 2017, will not be considered, though previous participating photographers are more than welcome to submit new images. The Print Swap show will run from October 30th through November 12th, 2017.

Learn more at www.theprintswap.com and follow along at @theprintswap on Instagram for updates. And be sure to check out the winners of the first ever Print Swap exhibition, happening this summer at Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Park.


Black Eye Gallery

Black Eye Gallery

65 Photos from The Print Swap Are Coming to Photoville!

‘A Broken Pulsar’ © Fili Olsefski, Athens, Greece

‘Down by the Station’ © Steffen Tuck, Brisbane, Australia

‘Havana by Night’ © Eric Hsu, New York, NY

Last year, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a way to connect photographers around the world. The rules are simple: anyone can submit by using the hashtag #theprintswap on Instagram. If your image is selected, it’s printed by the experts at Skink Ink in Brooklyn before being mailed across the world and landing on the doorstep of another winner. Every winning photographer gives a print, and every winning photographer receives a print too. Pieces are mailed out randomly, so it’s always a fun surprise to see who ends up with which print.

Since its inception, The Print Swap has received more than 45,000 submissions. Curators Alison Zavos and Julia Sabot have selected more than 2,500 winning images. Over the past two months, they’ve also considered all incoming submissions and handpicked 65 of them to show at the first ever Print Swap exhibition, opening in September at Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photoville, the largest annual photography event in New York City and, will include 70+ exhibitions this year, all installed in repurposed shipping containers-turned-galleries.

This is truly an international exhibition. Zavos and Sabot chose pictures from photographers working in twenty countries around the world. But more than that, this collection represents a wide range of practices, genres, and methods. There’s film; there’s digital. There’s classic black and white and vibrant, artificial color.

These photographers find reverence, dignity, and whimsy in humans and animals alike. Jake Green photographs Sonja Usher, an actor playing the role of the Archbishop of Canterbury in a production of Shakespeare’s Henry V. Kristen Bartley introduces us to Picasso, a dog whose name presumably comes from the slightly off-kilter structure of his face. Even uninhabited places, like Steffen Tuck’s Australian subway station or Bonita Chan’s reflected Hong Kong carousel, seem to thrum with life.

For all the beauty, there are also echoes of urgency and loss that color and illuminate corners of this exhibition. Aleksandra Dynas meets children living in the streets of Uganda, where over ten thousand young people go without food, shelter, education and medical care. Many work in demolition and do jobs on trucks, and the littlest ones collect metal and plastic. Yusni Aziz encounters a young resident of the Kampung Akuarium in Jakarta sitting in his “dream house,” a thoughtfully designed and decorated fisherman’s boat, after families in the area were evicted and their homes were razed to the ground.

Here, you’ll find all the participating photographers showing work at The Print Swap exhibition at Photoville. We hope you’ll visit in person between September 13-24, 2017. After all, these prints were meant to be seen in real life, hanging on a wall. As always, The Print Swap is open for submissions. Find more details on our website, and check in at @theprintswap on Instagram, where we regularly share winning images. Thank you to everyone to submitted work this time around. We love seeing your images.

The Architecture of Hong Kong As You’ve Never Seen It Before

Over the last few years, the dense, vertical architecture of Hong Kong has enchanted many photographers. Michael Wolf and Greer Muldowney studied the region’s urban density. Romain Jacquet-Lagreze photographed the buildings during “blue hour,” when silver moonlight mixes with the fluorescent light pouring out from countless windows. Peter Steinhauer documented the construction process.

Most of these photographers do not fly drones, and most of them have not lived in Hong Kong for their entire lives. These are two things that set photographer Andy Yeung apart. He’s been shooting this place and its architecture from the sky for the last few years, and he’s learned everything from the right time to launch to the proper spots to fly. In fact, in order to avoid electromagnetic interference, he’s been known to take off from a mountain peak.

Enter The 2017 PhotogrVphy Grant for a Chance at $1000

Images © Drew Nikonowicz, Elena Anosova, Matt Hamon

PhotogrVphy Magazine established the annual $1000 PhotogrVphy Grant to support photographers working across genres around the world. Every year, they welcome an international jury of editors, curators, publishers, agents, gallerists, academics to select winners who fit into five broad but distinct categories. This year’s categories are Architecture, Conceptual, Nature, Photojournalism, and Culture.

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