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Pornosynthesis: Revealing the Sensual Side of Flowers

Created by Robert Graves-Morris (@__rgm__), photography by Catherine Losing (@catherinelosing), design by Oreoluwa Ayoade (@o_ayoade), retouching by Paulina Teller (@PTretouch).

Created by Robert Graves-Morris (@__rgm__), photography by Catherine Losing (@catherinelosing), design by Oreoluwa Ayoade (@o_ayoade), retouching by Paulina Teller (@PTretouch).

Catherine Losing and Robert Graves-Morris reveal a side of flowers you have never seen before in their sensual series cleverly titled Pornosynthesis.

The project is a visual journey into the sexuality of plants, giving us a close-up view of the inside parts of flowers. Influenced by vintage 70’s pornography magazines and driven by their passion and concern for bee populations and environmental issues, Losing and Graves-Morris combine their creativity and vision to form stunning glamour shots of lush flora.

Each plant is glazed to the point of dripping, exuding a sexuality that we would normally never think to attribute to a plant.

When asked about how they achieved this glossy, dewy effect, Losing said that she loves to “use light to add texture and form to still life subjects. We also used a fair bit of a still life staple—glycerine—to add some juices.”

Stunning Portraits of LGBTQ Writers at the Height of the AIDS Crisis

Robert Giard. Storme Webber, New York City, 1990. 15 x 15”, gelatin silver print.
Webber is a poet, playwright, educator and artist. Her collections of poetry include “Diaspora”, “Blues Divine” and “Noirish Lesbiana”.

Robert Giard. John Giorno, New York City, 1993. 15 x 15”, gelatin silver print.

On July 16, 2002, American photographer Robert Giard died doing what he loved best — traveling across the country to make portraits of LGBTQ+ writers. In total, Giard photographed some 600 writers from all walks of life, creating a visual record during the height of the AIDS crisis.

Giard’s inclusive spirit lead him to create a veritable catalogue that encompasses not only a broad swath of enthographic communities, but a diverse array of literary practitioners, be it novelists, playwrights, and poets or journalists, historians, and activists including Stonewall rebels Sylvia Rivera and Storme De Laverie.

The photographs were first published in the landmark book Particular Voices: Portraits of Gay and Lesbian Writers (MIT Press, 1997), and in 2004, the renowned Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library at Yale University acquired Robert Giard’s complete archive as part of the Yale Collection of American Literature.

Now a selection of 53 portraits are on view in Particular Voices: Photographs of LGBTQ Writers, Artists and Activists, 1980’s – 90’s at Daniel Cooney Fine Art, New York, now through July 26, 2019. Here, we get first-person accounts of Giard through the eyes of those who sat for him as well as Jonathan Sillin, Giard’s life partner, co-president of the Robert Giard Foundation, and executor of the Robert Giard Estate.

A journey to the frontlines of the fight for animal rights

The photojournalist Aitor Garmendia stands outside a farm in Italy, accompanied by investigators from the animal rights group Essere Animali. Inside, there are thousands of pigs, all bred and raised for meat. It’s the dead of night. All is silent. There are guards inside. “You have one minute,” the investigation coordinator tells Garmendia. He slips inside, turns on the light, and photographs what he sees.

This was just one of the twelve nights Garmendia spent with the team from Essere Animali. Each one posed new risks. In total, they investigated eleven farms.

A Portrait of the Artist as a Legend in Their Own Time

Georgia O’Keefe, Ghost Ranch, New Mexico, 1968. Silver Gelatin Photograph, 12 15/16 x 8 3/4 inches. Stamped verso. Print Made Later

Henri Cartier-Bresson, 1947. Silver Gelatin Photograph. 9 3/16 x 12 1/2 inches. Stamped verso. Print Made Later

Diana Vreeland, 1974 . Vintage Silver Gelatin Photograph Mounted to Board, 13 5/8 x 10 5/8 inches. Signed, titled and dated in pencil on mount recto. Titled in pencil on mount verso. Print made c. 1974

Known as the “father of the environmental portrait,” American photographer Arnold Newman (1918–2006) transformed the way in which we consider the person we are gazing upon. By taking them out of the studio and restoring them to their rightful place, we see the subject as a product of their environment — and their environment as an extension of the inner self.

“You don’t take pictures with your camera. You take pictures with your mind and your heart,” Newman said, recognizing the underlying connection between the artist, their subject, and the work itself.

Hailing from New York, Newman had his first solo exhibition at the Philadelphia Museum of Art in 1945, garnering national attention for his revealing portraits collected for Artists Look Like This. It’s a subject that Newman revisited throughout his long, illustrious life, and the basis for the recent exhibition Arnold Newman, Artist Portraits at Fahey/Klein in Los Angeles.

Shutterstock Presents: Artists Series tells the creative stories behind the content

Shutterstock is a creative marketplace populated by talented photographers, illustrators, musicians and videographers from around the world.

Now Shutterstock invites audiences to discover the stories behind the creativity through the new Shutterstock Presents: Artists Series a video series highlighting these inspiring contributors.

Shutterstock Presents: Artists Series provides a behind-the-scenes look at the creative artists across the network, offering insight into the lives of contributors who choose to share their art with Shutterstock’s global audience.

Announcing the Winners of #ThePrintSwap Show at FOLEY Gallery in NYC

‘Tricked You’ © Erica Reade (@ericareadeimages), Brooklyn, New York

Girl playing with a tyre © Andrea Torrei (@andreatorrei), Bologna, Italy

‘Neither in Heaven nor on Earth’ © Rebeka Legovic (@rebekalegovic), Rijeka, Croatia

Feature Shoot’s worldwide project The Print Swap will return to Manhattan for our summer exhibition at the renowned FOLEY Gallery. Opening for one night only on July 23rd, this show features thirty photographs, each selected by the gallery owner Michael Foley himself. FOLEY Gallery is a perfect setting to showcase work from the global Print Swap community. The show will feature talented artists based in the United States, Brazil, England, Italy, Croatia, Spain, France, Germany, Sweden, the Netherlands, and Japan.

The show has no fixed theme, so we leave the images open to interpretation. Passageways and thresholds become recurring motifs, suggesting a hazy boundary line between the real and the imagined. On the beaches of New York, Erica Reade experiments with mirrors, transfiguring space and time. Rebeka Legovic photographs a dog walking steadily into the unknown. In Cape Coast, Ghana, Andrea Torrei watches a girl as she plays with a tire, creating what could be a portal to another world. Alison Schmitz drifts skyward a surreal cloudscape, while Jesus Domingo takes us an a journey by boat to the end of the world.

If you’re in New York this summer, be sure to see the show in person on the 23rd!

The Print Swap is an ongoing initiative launched by Feature Shoot. Here’s how it works: photographers can submit images for consideration by tagging them #theprintswap on Instagram or uploading them directly to our website. Our team of curators chooses outstanding images, and selected photographers are invited to participate in our international swap. It’s free to submit, and it costs just $40/image for selected photographers to take part.

All Print Swap participating photographers give a print and receive a print, and during our fixed judging periods, they are also considered for our offline exhibitions. Our next show will be at Photoville, and submissions are now open! As NYC’s largest annual photography event, Photoville draws more than 80,000 visitors to Brooklyn Bridge Park each September. Learn more at our website, and follow along on Instagram at @theprintswap for updates. We can’t wait to see your submissions!

We talked to Cortis and Sonderegger, the ingenious duo that recreates history’s most iconic photographs with miniatures

Unless you were abducted by aliens over the last couple of years, it’s highly likely that you’ve seen one way or another the work of Swiss photographers Jojakim Cortis and Adrian Sonderegger.

Time Magazine, The New York Times, Vice, Buzzfeed, and practically every major news outlet under the sun has covered their ongoing project “Icons”, in which the duo set out to recreate with miniature models the most emblematic photographs in history.

Their partnership started back in 2005 when they were studying photography at Zurich University of the Arts. That fruitful creative collaboration extended to their professional career with their own studio, landing over the years many high profile gigs with clients like Greenpeace and leading cookware manufacturer Kuhn Rikon.

The Hindenburg Disaster, Sam Shere, 1937

Making of ‘The Seven year Itch’, Sam Shaw, 1954

“Icons” started in 2012 both as a joke and as a way to keep themselves busy during downtime. Their first experiment was to recreate Andreas Gursky’s infamous Rhein II, at the time the most expensive photograph ever sold. (a record broken in 2014 by Phantom, by Australian photographer Peter Li)

Armed with cardboard, cotton wool, sand, glue, tin foil paper and many other materials that at first glance would seem more appropriate in a school science fair than in a professional studio, the creative team started to painstakingly recreate with miniatures the most significant photographs in history.

Among their recreations, we can find cultural symbols like Pennie Smith’s cover for London Calling, transcendent historical events like the 9-11 attack on the World Trade Center, and decisive moments in the evolution of photography like Niépce’s View from the Window at Le Gras from 1826, the earliest surviving photograph of a real-world scene.

The Artist Hijacking Photographic Clichés to Explore Gender Stereotypes

Sara Cwynar. Red Rose, 2017.
Pigment print mounted on Dibond 30 x 24 in. Artist’s proof 1/2 Collection of David Madee

Sara Cwynar. Tracy (Pantyhose), 2017.
Dye sublimation print on aluminum 30 x 38 in. Edition #1 of 3, Edition of 3 with 2AP

Like any language, photography has given birth to a series of clichés that are reductive at best. At their worst, they become a vehicle for disinformation and stereotype, fueling pathologies by reinforcing the most dangerous aspects of confirmation bias. As Jenny Holzer noted, “Clichés endure” — and may very well exist until we root them out and expose them for the perilous, short-sighted, and sloppy thinking that they are.

Canadian artist Sara Cwynar takes aim at popular photographic clichés in her new exhibition, Gilded Age, on view at the Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum in Ridgefield, CT, through November 10, 2019. Featuring a selection of the artist’s color photographs made over the past five years, the exhibition also includes Kitsch Encyclopedia (2014) her first artist book; Cover Girl (2018), a 16mm film on video with sound; and 72 Pictures of Modern Paintings (2016), a site-specific wallpaper.

Looking back at LGBTQ life, 50 years after Stonewall

KARLA JAY, born in Brooklyn in 1947, is a distinguished professor emerita at Pace University, where she taught English and directed the women’s and gender studies program between 1974 and 2009. A pioneer in the field of lesbian and gay studies, she is widely published.

CHELLA MAN is a 20-year-old, deaf, genderqueer, queer artist currently transitioning on testosterone. “Every day left me exhausted as I performed traditional femininity.” Born in Pennsylvania, he moved to New York to study virtual reality programming at The New School, while creating art on the side. His main focus is to educate others on issues regarding being queer and disabled within a safe space.

Fifty years after the Stonewall Rebellion gave birth to the global LGBTQ Movement, generations have continued the fight for freedom and equality — knowing full well the moment we stop fighting is the moment that all hell breaks loose.

Consider the June 28 report of a Black trans woman who disrupted a drag show at the Stonewall Inn during the 50th anniversary celebration to call out how Pride has been co-opted by corporations even through Black trans women are being murdered — and was threatened with police action in an effort to silence her.

It was a cruel but telling episode of history repeating itself, half a century later at the very place where Gay Liberation began. In the early morning hours of June 28, 1969, by homeless LGBTQ teens, trans women of color, lesbians, drag queens, and gay men stood up against a police raid, sparking off a multi-night uprising on the streets of New York’s Greenwich Village.

In the aftermath of Stonewall, hundreds of new LGBTQ civil rights organizations took root across the country and around the world, forcing the U.S. government to change their laws. Though the war has not been won, the battles rage on.

Collier Schorr: Stonewall at 50, currently on view at the Alice Austen House in Staten Island, New York, through September 30, honors those doing the work in a series 15 black and white portraits of intergenerational activists including native New Yorker Karla Jay, an early member of the Gay Liberation Front (GLF) and the Radicalesbians who famously incited the “Lavender Menace Zap” at the Second Congress to Unite Women in 1970.

Here Jay shares her memories and lessons gleaned on the front lines, which we can use to continue to fight in the name of those who did not make it out alive.

The Photograph That Rocked the Pop Culture Landscape

Peggy Moffitt modeling the topless swimsuit designed by Rudi Gernreich, 1964. Photograph © William Claxton, LLC, courtesy of Demont Photo Management & Fahey/Klein Gallery Los Angeles, with permission of the Rudi Gernreich trademark.

Rudi Gernreich (seated in center wearing black zippered jacket) among fellow artists on the steps of LACMA, 1968. Photo © Museum Associates/LACMA.

On June 16, 1964, Rudi Gernreich’s infamous monokini went on sale in New York’s most prestigious department stores. Buyers at B. Altman & Co., Lord & Taylor, Henri Bendel, Abraham & Strauss, Splendiferous and Parisette placed orders after William Claxton’s photograph of Peggy Moffit rocked the pop culture landscape.

Moffit was Gernreich’s muse and Claxton’s wife, and together this ménage a trios was pure fire. The idea for the monokini first came to Gernreich in December 1962 and first appeared in futuristic fashion feature in a late 1963 issue of Look magazine — after LIFE refused to publish them. In The Rudy Gernreich Book, Moffit recalls the editor at LIFE shamelessly told Claxton, “This is a family magazine, and naked breasts are allowed only if the woman is an aborigine.”

LIFE’s racist policy about women’s bodies cost them one of the biggest news stories of the year. They “goofed” Moffitt politely says. The magazine ordered a reshoot, demanding Moffitt cover her breasts with her arms. Moffitt described their art direction as “dirty.”

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