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Posts tagged: fine art photography

Photos Document the Simple Life in the Abandoned Villages of Catalonia

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Aldea De Pano, Huesca, Aragon. Ruben With A Rabbit And His Dog Mistu

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El Fonoll, Tarragona, (Conca de Barberà), Catalonia, Spain. A woman with her daughter on holiday at El Fonoll’s naturist village.

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Matavenero, Leon, Spain Matavenero, Leon, Spain. One of the houses of Matavenero.

The Northern Spanish landscape, report Italian photographers Diambra Mariani and Francesco Mion, is flecked with tiny, sequestered villages that have remained largely deserted for decades. While most of the rural population has since abandoned these bucolic corners of the country for buzzing cities, recent years have seen a rebirth; with the help of a few devoted and romantic souls, these forgotten bowers have been suffused with new life.

‘The Gods’ Portrays the Lives of Strippers and Hustlers in the American South (NSFW)

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Python, 2013

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The Hotel Geneva, 2010

For The Gods, London-based photographer Ivar Wigan immerses himself within the culture of hustlers of the American South, slipping into strip clubs and street parties to capture the threads of resilience and enterprise that shine brightly within the throes helter-skelter abandon.

Forest Landscapes Suffused with Stars from Faraway Galaxies

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As a little girl, London-based photographer Ellie Davies knew The New Forest inside and out; she ran along its streams, built small hideaways, and searched for the mushrooms that lay hidden beside the ancient oaks. As with so many of the native habits of our childhoods, the photographer finds that in adulthood, the southern English wood has become foreign and mysterious. For Stars, she considers her ambiguous bond with the wild terrain by revisiting to the sites of her youth and overlaying her landscape photographs with the celestial bodies captured by NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope.

‘Sharon’ Captures a Father’s Love for His Disabled Daughter

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Sharon’s father, California-based photographer Leon Borensztein, has documented her life since before it began, when she was tiny and developing in her mother’s womb. Sharon was born legally blind and with underdeveloped muscles and motor skills; additionally, she has struggled with a seizure disorder and has been diagnosed on the Autism spectrum. For the last thirty years, Borensztein has continued to photograph his daughter, to learn the ways in which she navigates the world, to share in both her delight and her disappointments.

Fun Photos Juxtapose Family life in Long Island with 1970s Nightlife in NYC

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Elda (Gentile) Stilletto and Guitarist at CBGB, NY, NY, April 1978

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Mom Getting her hair teased at Besame Beauty Salon, North Massapequa, NY, June 1979

When New York-based photographer Meryl Meisler was a little girl growing up in Long Island, a neighboring child remarked during a playdate in the yard that because she was Jewish, she would never be allowed into heaven. “The best you can do is Purgatory,” said the neighbor girl. Printed decades later, Purgatory & Paradise: SASSY ’70s Suburbia & The City is Meisler’s response, an intimate album that marries her domestic shots of family life in suburbia with her portraits of 1970s nightlife in the Big Apple in the age of punk and disco.

Photographer Scans Every Item He Consumes Over 14 Years, Builds Astonishing Collages

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My Things No.5, 2005

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My Things, Booking Keeping of 2007-08

Since 2001, Beijing-based photographer Hong Hao has been recording every single item that passes through his fingers over the course of each day, those he uses and those he discards. In a practice that he describes as a form of “bookkeeping,” he scans each object one by one, saves the images, and returns to them once more to weave them together into labyrinthine digital collages.

Portraits Show the Vacant Stares of Children Engrossed in TV

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Children in America watch over 24 hours of television per week. If they’re not watching TV, they likely have their eyes glued to another screen, the gadget of the moment. Photographer Donna Stevens’ series Idiot Box seeks to draw attention to the constant presence of technology and its most impressionable audience, our children.

A Photographers Journey to Find ‘Home’ in China

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During Hungarian photographer Bence Bakonyi‘s one year stay in China, he sought out to find “home” in a world completely unknown and foreign to him. Unable to speak the language, and with no assistance, it was nearly impossible to communicate with the local people. As a result, he refrained from photographing people and instead focused his creative energy on capturing the environment. Segue is a photographic journey of a foreign space, as depicted through landscapes and inanimate objects.

Photos Capture a Community of Transgender Women Living in Paris in the 1950s and 60s

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Belinda, 1967

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Nana, 1959

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Carla & Zizou, Brasserie Graff, 1963

In December of 1959, Paris’s Place Pigalle was overtaken by the annual carnival, the squares bustling with snake charmers, feral animals held in cages, strippers, and throngs of ecstatic visitors carrying cotton candy. In the midst of it all, the women of Place Blanche lingered hither and thither. It was with these women—a great many of them transgender—and in that era that Swedish photographer Christer Strömholm (1918-2002) found his home-away-from home. He stayed there for nine years from 1959-1958, and in 1983, he told their story with his classic monograph Les amies de Place Blanche (The Friends From Place Blache), now a collector’s item.

Graphic and Bold Photos of the Montreal Metro

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My personal experience on the Montreal Metro is probably not unlike the other 1.2 million daily riders. I am usually in a rush and impatient to get where I am going. I try to avoid as much human contact as possible by hiding my head in a book or scrolling through my phone. Canadian photographer Chris Forsyth’s recent project, Metro, seeks to change this common commuter experience. By slowing down, and taking time to recognize the bold, beautiful design and architecture we ignore on a daily basis, he showcases the Montreal Metro in a brand new light.