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Posts tagged: fine art photography

Heartwarming Portraits of Extremely Old Dogs

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“Benjamin was found as a stray and ended up in a shelter about a year and a half ago. Pugalug Pug Rescue took him in and we were his foster parents. Due to his age and his medical problems, Ben was put in the ‘Abode Program'; he would be a long term foster. We thought it was important that he have a forever family so we adopted him; we are foster failures (again). He is estimated to be about 14 years old.”

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“Finnegan is a Brussels Griffon smooth coat or a Petit Brabançon. He is 12.5 years old. When he lived in Montreal, he went by his French name: Finni le Poo.”

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“Meet Stella the 12-year-old, one-eyed wonder Chihuahua! The little head tilt gives this tough girl a bit of deserved attitude.”

For Old Faithful, Toronto-based photographer Pete Thorne captures the time-worn faces of elderly dogs, inviting the canines to sit for him in his home studio and sometimes making special trips to visit those who, in their old age, are unable to make the journey.

‘Can’t Wait to Feel You’

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© Galeries / Offset

To see more of Galeries’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

Photo du Jour: Handstands

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Mara and Jessica in the director’s office, Summer 2013

We are all the hero of our own lives, a silent protagonist whose hopes and dreams the world secretly revolves around. Photographer Rachele Maistrello encourages people to play out their desires and aspirations right where they stand in A Hero’s Life.

Exclusive Interview with ‘The Cut’ Photo Editor Emily Shornick About Online Editing and Her Quirky Collection of Offset Imagery

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© The Licensing Project / Offset

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© The Licensing Project / Offset

The Cut is a division of New York Magazine devoted entirely to female-driven content, covering everything from breaking fashion news to complex explorations of contemporary women’s issues. In addition to keeping its millions of readers appraised of the latest celebrity gossip and most engaging political debates, The Cut has helped define the voice of the Millennial Generation, generating viral content that speaks to a diverse group of 20-something women. The Cut seamlessly merges the sex and relationship advice of Cosmopolitan, the fashion of Vogue, and the stimulating content of Ms. Magazine, securing its position as a leading daily resource for women.

Photo du Jour: A Tale of Two Baby Squirrels

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In early September of this year, I discovered a baby squirrel on the side of the road. With unopened eyes and just a downy layer of fur, she was unable to fend for herself. I picked her up and carried her in my hands to the nearest vet’s office, her small snout burrowing into my skin in search of food.

‘Fifty Shrinks': A Fascinating Look Inside the Offices of Dozens of NYC Therapists

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“… I have been an analyst for more than fifty years and I still find it astonishing that every patient has something new to communicate. Sometimes I’ll encounter a patient who has so much new to say that it’s bewildering. It is as if any analyst is living not only his own life, but also the lives of countless other people. So I think I am making a bargain with Death. I am cheating. I am living more than one life.” — Marin Bergmann, PhD

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“… My taste is for African art that comes from my Afro-centric perspective. That’s a part of who I am. If a white analyst puts African art in her office, it is perceived as nothing more than her having good taste. For me, as an African American, when I choose to display African art, it is interpreted differently, more personally, as an aspect of my identity, which is also true. I can imagine that to some new black patients, their first reaction might be” ‘I want to get out of here. This guy has his black self right up front and out there. I don’t want to deal with the black part of myself. I’d rather go to a white analyst.’ In a way, I’m challenging those patients to respond. It opens the dialogue where I can say, ‘okay let’s see what we can do with that response,’ and then the real therapeutic work can begin…” — Kirkland C. Vaughns, PhD

For Fifty Shrinks, New York City-based photographer and psychiatrist Sebastian Zimmermann shot dozens of therapists and psychoanalysts standing or seated within their private offices. The seedling ideas for the project began to take root as Zimmermann built his own practice in Upper West Side Manhattan, where he observed within himself a sense of remoteness from the outside world. While his patients shared with him intimate portions of themselves, the role of psychiatrist necessitated a detached and discrete existence.

English Phone Booth

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© Marc Wilson / Offset

To see more of Marc Wilson’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

Photo du Jour: Lone Stars

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Open Since 1950

For It’s only a short walk from home, New York-based photographer Courtney Dudley returns to her hometown just beyond the borders of Dallas, Texas, capturing her surroundings through a lens that is at once intimate and alien.

Photos of Wayward Farmers Reinterpret the Mythos of the American West

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Dean, 2013

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Drew Emerging, 2014

For Manifest, photographer Kristine Potter reinterprets quintessential visions of the American West, reframing the Colorado Western Slope and its remote inhabitants in such a way that distorts and obscures traditional legends of the past. Here, the emblematic cowboy and his mountains are abandoned for lonesome farmers and forgotten wildness, lost souls and phantasms.

Playful and Absurd Still Lifes by Molly Cranna

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© Molly Cranna / Offset

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© Molly Cranna / Offset

Los Angeles-based photographer Molly Cranna’s playful still lifes position themselves at the border of the seductive and the grotesque. Scouring dollar stores for eye-popping objects, Cranna pulls together compositions that are both elegant and absurd. She describes her aesthetic as hip with a twist of retro flare, incorporating strong graphic elements that imbue her work with an abiding and everlasting allure.