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Posts tagged: fine art photography

Photos of the New Orleans Neighborhood That Disappeared

Waiting, 2011

Feeding, 2009

Stephen Hilger didn’t photograph what became known as “Lower Mid-City,” New Orleans, in hopes of saving it. He photographed it after it could no longer be saved.

Joel Sternfeld’s Colorful and Ironic America

Kansas City, Kansas, May 1983 © Joel Sternfeld, courtesy Luhring Augustine Gallery and Beetles + Huxley Gallery

McLean, Virginia, December 1978 © Joel Sternfeld, courtesy Luhring Augustine Gallery and Beetles + Huxley Gallery

In the early 1970s, Joel Sternfeld traveled the country in a Volkswagen camper with his large format camera. For years, he stopped over in small towns no one had ever heard of and saw them for what seemed like the very first time. In 1987, he published American Prospects and became one of the earliest photographers to legitimize the use of color.

Some of the Best Photos of the Century Honored in The Lucie Editions

“Hope, Portrait #5, 2005″ by Erwin Olaf

After fourteen years of honoring the world’s greatest photographers with The Lucie Awards, The Lucie Foundation has released a series of limited edition posters by their honorees.

The Lucie Editions are part of the charitable foundation’s ongoing mission to recognize established talent and support emerging voices.

Glass Mountains Glitter In The Israeli Desert

Dotting one of Israel’s most remote desert towns are enormous piles of jagged glass. “Tiny shards, millions of them, piled into rolling hills of green and brown,” Tel Aviv-based photographer Oded Balilty describes.

To some, they might seem nothing more than piles of broken glass in an otherwise barren landscape. But to Balilty, the represent the glittering completion of a symbolic cycle.

“It’s like sand dunes, literally, because glass is made from sand,” Balilty, who photographed the glass for a project called Glass Mountains, told National Geographic. “They put the glasses in the desert. It’s very symbolic. It’s like the bottles are dying there, and they get new life. It’s like ‘from dust to dust.’ So to be in the middle of this circle, it’s something that I really enjoy watching.”

Hiroshi Sugimoto and the Magic of the Darkroom

Lightning Fields 327, 2014 © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s photographs are often described as “timeless,” but the truth is, they’re all about the passage of time.

A Treasure Trove of Photos from Vancouver in the 1950s and 1960s

Ferry Barber Shop, 1959 © Fred Herzog and Equinox Gallery

Black Man Pender, 1958 © Fred Herzog and Equinox Gallery

The Vancouver of the 1950s and 1960s has vanished. The wooden houses have been replaced by concrete, and the wide streets have narrowed and filled. But before Vancouver changed, it was photographed in color by Fred Herzog.

Revealing the Unexpected Magic of Small-Town Iowa

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Strawberry Point, IA

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Grant Wood Scenic Byway, IA

“I thought the future would be uniformly futuristic,” Iowa City photographer Barry Phipps says, looking back on his childhood daydreams, “The reality is more of series of layers of cultural accumulations.”

‘Flying Dogs’ Have the Time of Their Lives

Amy © Julia Christe

Scotch © Julia Christe

It all started with a dog named Flinn and his frisbee. His owner, photographer Julia Christe, set out to capture in an instant the unbridled joy of playing dogs like Flinn, and after quite a lot of shenanigans with dozens of canines, Flying Dogs was born.

Powerful Photos of the Body After Death

When photographer Patrik Budenz first requested permission to document the work at Berlin’s Institute of Legal Medicine and Forensic Sciences in 2007, the answer was no. When he wrote a proposal to the head of the institute, he was told to wait two weeks for a response. Twenty minutes later, he got the phone call. He was invited to bring his camera into the autopsy room, labs, and after some time, onto crime scenes.

Lust, Desire, and Longing Behind-the-Scenes at Japan’s Love Hotels

Belgian photographer Zaza Bertrand doesn’t speak Japanese and was only able to gather bits and pieces of words exchanged between the people she met in the country’s popular rabuhos, or love hotels. The mystery was part of the appeal.

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