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Posts tagged: fine art photography

Call for Entries: The RPS International Photography Exhibition

Rose in a Fox Mask © Melanie Eclare

Abrigo Corner 1 © Tom Blachford

The International Photography Exhibition by The Royal Photographic Society has been a fixture of the photography community since 1854, just fifteen years after the invention and introduction of practical photography. Now in it’s 160th year, the IPE is the single longest-running photography competition of its kind, allowing contemporary photographers to follow in the footsteps of early exhibitors like Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Steichen, and Roger Fenton.

For this year’s worldwide call for submissions, the RPS has once again opened its doors to photographers of all backgrounds, working in all genres. As always, there is no fixed theme, making IPE one of the most consistently diverse photography exhibitions in the world.

Brutality in the illegal clinics that claim to ‘cure’ homosexuality in Ecuador

“Four years ago a friend told me about these clinics that try to convert gay people and transexuals, and at that time I hadn’t come out to my parents” says Ecuadorian photographer Paola Paredes discussing her latest series Until You Change, “This is not just happening in Ecuador, it’s a global issue. It happens in Mexico, Colombia, even in Europe and the US. Naturally I imagined that this could happen to me too”.

The Iconic 1940s Photographer Who Never Wanted to Be Famous

“LaSalle at Amsterdam” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

“125th Street” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

The photographs arrived at The Curator Gallery in a box meant for curator Bill Shapiro, the former editor of Life magazine. When he saw the first few pictures, the curator wondered if he could possibly be looking at the work of a Life photographer he didn’t recognize. He had never heard of the man behind the hundred-some images inside the box.

As it turned out, the package had been left for him by Betsy Evans, a friend of the late photographer Todd Webb, who left behind an extensive archive. Though the elusive photographer had never been at Life, Webb shared a time, a place, and a sensibility with those who had. He was friends with Life staffer Gordon Parks. He also worked and played alongside Walker Evans, Ansel Adams, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott, and Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O’Keeffe.

This New Book for Photographers is Full of Ideas to Unlock Creativity

Up & Away, 2011

A Mad Tea Party with Alice, 2011

“For better or worse, you can’t simply start being an artist when work begins, and then stop being one when work is over,” photographer Claire Rosen writes in her new book, “You are an artist all the time.”

IMAGINARIUM: The Process Behind the Pictures is a book for creative people who dare to step out of their comfort zones, dig deep, and pull something beautiful out of the murky abyss of their own minds. Rosen’s own photographs— made from her dreams, her memories, and old stories— illustrate the guide, taking us through the steps of finding, brainstorming, executing, and editing ideas.

40 Subversive Female Photographers Who Capture Women in a New Way

Lulu, Ali and Sofy, Long Island, 2015 © Mayan Toledano

Zinzi and Tozama II Mowbray, 2010 © Zanele Muholi

Untitled #23 (Selfie), 2013-16 © Petra Collins

In 1975, feminist film critic Laura Mulvey coined the phrase “the male gaze.” For centuries, the default audience in art and media has been assumed to be both male and heterosexual. 1972, John Berger supported that idea, writing, “Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at.” More than 40 years later, the tides are finally changing.

Critics, curators, and scholars have a new phrase now: The Female Gaze. Writer Charlotte Jansen is one of them, and her new book Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze is an in-depth exploration of the phenomenon, as seen through the eyes of 40 contemporary artists, working across 17 countries worldwide.

One Photographer’s Fight for the Hudson River in New York

“This is our Standing Rock,” photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood says of the Hudson River.

Photos of the Last Remaining American Drive-In Theaters

Frontier Drive-In, Center, Colorado. Abandoned
“The Frontier Drive-In was possibly my favorite location that in hindsight I wish I had given more time to. As we drove down this long highway surrounded by nothing, we were heading straight towards the biggest rain cloud I have ever seen. As soon as we had the theatre in our sights, the torrential rain started. My assistant and I sat in the car for nearly an hour, until finally we got a 10-minute break in the rain.”

East Hartford Drive-In, South Windsor, Connecticut. Abandoned
“The shoot at East Hartford was very special because I got to create a photograph that had been in my head since the beginning of this project. I found a model who also had an amazing vintage car he was willing to drive back into the unmaintained lot. Of course it started to rain as soon as we arrived, so I had to work quickly, but we were able to create one of my favorite images from the trip.”

In the summer of 2014, Portland photographer Lindsey Rickert packed up her life and hit the road in search of drive-in movie theaters around the county. Some had been closed and deserted; others had adapted to a swiftly-changing market and were still in business. In total, she spent over two months in her car, traversing an estimated 12,022 miles across the United States.

Magical Photos from the World’s Surviving Tribes

Suri Girl with Orchid Wreath, Ethiopia

Sisters Meal Festival Dancer in Guizhou, China

Photographer Terri Gold says she wants to find “the grace notes” of humanity. She has vivid memories of spinning an old-fashioned globe as a child, and as an adult, she dreams of faraway places and the secrets they keep hidden.

Gold has devoted much of her life to visiting the Indigenous tribal communities of our planet. The longterm project Still Points in a Turning World has taken her to Namibia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, India, and China. She’s camped under the desert skies with the Wodaabe nomads, and she’s watched the sunrise over the villages of the Omo Valley, where people paint their bodies and adorn themselves with plants and shells and bones. She has driven through the hairpin turns of the mountains of Guizhou, a landscape etched with 2000-year-old rice terraces.

‘The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags’ Shows You How to Be Successful on Instagram

At Feature Shoot, we find a lot of our stories on Instagram. It’s one of the top places we search for new and emerging talent, and we’re not the only ones.

“When I assign, I look at a photographer’s Instagram presence first,” Kerri MacDonald, Social Media Photo Editor at The New York Times, told us. Olivier Laurent, editor TIME’s photo website LightBox, agrees: “I constantly use Instagram to discover new talents. One can learn a lot about a photographer’s vision, identity and commitment through her or his Instagram feed.”

Hashtags are the key to making your work visible to photo editors, curators, and potential clients. Many editors, including the editors of Feature Shoot, search through their favorite hashtags every single day. “Hashtags have helped companies and brands discover my work and then hire me to produce content for them” photographer Joshua K. Jackson says, “I’ve also sold fine art prints to people through my website after they found my profile under specific tags on Instagram.”

It can be hard to know what hashtags to use. Hashtags that are too general aren’t useful. If you tag your photos #photography, for instance, they’ll get lost in a sea of nearly 100 million images, so they key is getting specific.

That’s why we partnered with Photoshelter to create The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags. The comprehensive guide covers hashtags specific to eleven genres of photography, some of which might overlap: Travel, Portraits, Black and White, Street, Architecture, Minimalism, Documentary, Landscape, Film, Fine Art, and Drones/Aerial.

Readers of the The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags will find 67 specific hashtags to use for increased exposure and potential opportunities. We cover two different types of hashtags. “Searchable” hashtags are popular hashtags photo editors often use to search for content, whereas “Submittable” hashtags can be used to submit work directly to an influential feed, where it can be seen by a wide audience. Our hashtag, #myfeatureshoot, is an example of a submittable hashtag. To date, nearly half a million images have been submitted to our feed via Instagram, and we spotlight some of our our favorites every day.

Additionally, the guide includes insider tips from curators, influencers, editors, and photographers about how and when to use hashtags to suit your particular set of needs. We also gained insight into what leading photography Instagram accounts look for when searching for content.

The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags was produced by Feature Shoot in collaboration with Photoshelter. Get you free copy today.

A Fairytale World Hidden in the Landscapes of Sweden

As a child, Swedish photographer Isabella Stahl spent her days with the horses in the stable. She and the other kids in her village swam in the lakes and rivers and hiked through the woods. They munched on candy and explored the landscape surrounding their farms and houses, and one of the children’s dogs usually came along for the journey. They read ghost stories.

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