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Posts tagged: fine art photography

Eerie, Dreamlike Moments Made on Light-Sensitive Paper

Vanessa Marsh still remembers the night at sleep-away camp when she learned the truth about the night sky: once starlight reached the earth, it had already traveled trillions of miles. For this reason, a counselor told her, the twinkles she saw at night were already old— sometimes even hundreds or thousands of years old. The star itself could have died before she was born.

The Man Who Made History by Photographing India in Color

Raghubir Singh, Ganapati immersion, Chowpatty, Bombay, 1989
Chromogenic print
Photograph copyright © 2017 Succession Raghubir Singh,
Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

Raghubir Singh, Holi revellers, Bombay, 1990
Chromogenic print
Photograph copyright © 2017 Succession Raghubir Singh,
Courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery

In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Raghubir Singh (1942-1999) secured his position as one of the early serious photographers to work in color. At the time, Kodachrome slide film was not generally accepted by his contemporaries in Europe and the United States, but Singh felt it was necessary to his life and purpose as a photographer of India. Unfortunately, it wouldn’t be available in his home country until trade restrictions were lifted in the early 1990s. In the meantime, Singh relied on magazines overseas, including National Geographic, to provide him with the precious film he had nicknamed “King Kodachrome.”

A New Photo Book for People Who Love Cats

Midcentury Kitty on the Red Chair, 2015 © Sue Abramson

On the cover of PhotoCat., Schilt Publishing’s new ode to feline-kind, you’ll find a portrait of Sacha de Boer’s longtime companion– a picture simply called “Julius, tuned out, January 2008.” Julius casts his eyes down, inhabiting his own little black and white world. He might be falling asleep, or maybe he’s thinking about something important. In any case, he’s vulnerable in a way that cats rarely are.

Never-Before-Published Ryan McGinley Photos

© Ryan McGinley

When Ryan McGinley was a kid, one of his favorite books was The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. “I love Mark Twain and I love that adventurous spirit of getting into trouble,” he recently told Kathy Ryan. It’s a perfect line from a photographer famous for his wandering feet, group road trips, and out-of-the-way locations.

In collaboration with WeTransfer, the New York Times Magazine Photography Director combed through the archives of the legendary American photographer to curate a digital gallery of fifteen previously unpublished images. The photographs and their conversation were just released on WeTransfer.

Unforgettable Photos from One of the World’s Last Matrilineal Societies

Pema Lamu (73) from the village Zhashi. Faces and hands of most Mosuo women are marked by the daily working hours in the fields. There is a clear division of labor between men and women. Women are responsible for household duties and farmwork and men for heavy labor and funerals. Usually, it is the Dabu who is working the hardest.

Du Zhi Ma holds a photograph in her hand, a portrait of her, which was taken about 35 years ago. In the photo, she carries one of her three children in her arms.

In order to get to China’s Lugu Lake, where the Mosuo people live, German photographer Karolin Klüppel traveled by road. That road, she says, has only been around for one or two decades. Before then, the area was relatively remote, sheltered from curious outsiders. Today, there’s not only a road but also an airport. Tourists arrive by plane a few times a week. Life is changing for the Mosuo, especially the women.

These Photos Challenge Representations of South America

Imagery has historically been the thing that has shaped our views of the world, and especially of the regions we could only imagine but would never get to. Famous photographs, postcards and illustrations of places influenced the way the rest of the world was thinking about and interacting with them. While certain places like Africa and the Middle East were depicted as underdeveloped and dangerous, others like South America were exoticized and almost fantasized about. In any case, these places, commonly located outside of what would be considered the “Western world”, were stereotyped and diminished to reductive caricatures and depictions.

Elsa Leydier is a photographer using her work to question the representation of South American territories, such as the Amazon forest, in media. It’s with vibrant and vivid colours that Elsa tells what she defines as “alternative and lesser known stories”. The careful deconstruction and reconstruction of existing images of these places, overlapped with images she took herself, is part of a process done by the fine art photographer to remind viewers that the way we see these images are visual representations created by a third party and therefore, not an accurate and real representation of the place itself. The result: ethereal, surrealist-looking and almost phantasmagoric images. Follow Leydier on Instagram for more. 

Grief, Loss, and Hope in the Streets of New York City

Daeja Fallas’s grandfather, Jack Peters, taught her how to spell her name. He taught her how to ride a bike, ice skate, build a fire, and plant a garden. In summer, he and her grandmother took her on adventures in their mobile home, showing her the most beautiful and wild places in the United States. Peters also gave Fallas her very first camera, a gift that would follow her and help shape her adult life as a photographer.

The Overlooked Value of Motherhood Revealed in Photos

Hidden Mother: Eileen

Hidden Mother: Jenn

“I come from a long line of matriarchs and feminists,” New Mexico photographer Megan Jacobs tells me. “Both my grandmother and my mother were fearless in their times.” Now a parent herself, the artist drew inspiration from old images from the Victorian era to create Hidden Mothers.

Bittersweet Photos by a Man Grieving His Partner’s Death

Minnesota photographer Andrew A. Amundsen moved to his attic loft apartment abruptly after the death of his girlfriend and muse, a woman named Laurie with whom he had shared twelve years. Having lost their mother to cancer, Laurie’s two daughters, who had been part of Amundsen’s world since they were three and six years old, went to live with their father. “I was instantly alone,” the artist remembers.

See 40 Landscapes from The Print Swap at Black Eye Gallery

‘Ella as Dorothy’ © Cathy Ronalds (@cathyronalds), Victoria, Australia

‘Búðakirkja (Black church). Búðir, Iceland. November 2016.’ © Brian S. Lee (@brianslee_), Atlanta, GA

‘Dogs of Teotihuacán’ © Michelle Lorén (@fotoinfinitum), Pomona, CA

Since Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a worldwide project for photographers who want to share their work with one another, we’ve had repeated requests for exhibitions. This fall, The Print Swap is proud to present Ambient Landscapes at Black Eye Gallery in Sydney, Australia.

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