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Posts tagged: fine art photography

These photographs will make you question your assumptions about the human body

What is a body if not the sum of all its parts? Though strange and distorted, the bodies portrayed here are not manipulated in any way. Whether we regard these curious images with awe, feel repulsed—or experience a combination of the two—this is London-based photographer Chloe Rosser’s attempt “to turn some of our assumptions on their heads.” Her ongoing series Form & Function is on display at the Photofusion Photography Centre in London until 18 June 2018—a solo exhibition organised in partnership with the L A Noble Gallery.

Ethereal images portray a subculture in decline

“We often confuse it (melancholia) with nostalgia but it is in fact altogether different,” explains photographer Sebastien Zanella. “Melancholia is a suspended state where we are able to observe the world from a distance. Not too happy, not too sad, just as it is. A moment where we are struck by the immensity of what is in front of us, and our inability to change any of it.”

The Vulnerability of Pit Bulls, in Photos

Frida, adopted

Sula, available for adoption at AZK9 Rescue

Rumple, available for adoption at Animal Haven

When the photographer Sophie Gamand first pitched her Pit Bull Flower Power book to publishers, she faced resistance. One suggested, “Nobody cares about pit bulls.” Gamand is familiar with this sentiment. Over the four years she’s spent photographing the misunderstood dogs, she’s learned some painful facts: about one million pit bull type dogs die in shelters each year because they do not find homes. Approximately one out of every six hundred is adopted. In the United States, a pit bull is euthanized every thirty seconds, due in large part to an unwarranted stigma fed by biased and negative press. Abuse and neglect effect hundreds of thousands of individual animals. But at the same time, Gamand has also discovered another truth: families around the world have pit bulls they love and cherish.

Infrared Photos of the Sublime Landscape of New Zealand

When the Australian photographer Kasia Sykus traveled to New Zealand for two weeks, she chose 35mm infrared color film in part because of its rarity and unpredictability, traits they share with the feral landscape. “I felt little a tiny speck in a giant, open wilderness,” the artist remembers. Even when she happened upon the occasional farm animals, they skittered away, leaving her behind in the vast, sprawling terrain.

Quiet but Epic Landscape Photos Made in Winter

Coots

Underbelly

Wave No. 1

According to an old Cheyenne Native American myth, the world began with only water and animals. Most of the animals lived in the sea; however, the birds took to the sky. Unable to land, the winged creatures grew weary and plunged to the sea floor in hopes of finding solid ground. Finally, the courageous coot brought a bit of mud to the surface.That mud expanded and widened until, at last, it became the Earth.

Coots also appear in the works of Seattle photographer Jessica Cantlin. Her pictures recall that time before time, leaving space only for the essentials: water, wind, snow, rain, and fog. In dark and dreary surroundings, she finds singular moments, hidden from the hustle and bustle of human life. And while everyone else stays indoors for fear of “bad” weather, she’s out searching. “Often I have my kids in tow, and they are yelling at me to get back in the car or move on,” she admits. “I have to tune it all out: my children yelling at me from the car window and the anxiousness that stirs up inside me when I am cold and wet and want to give in. When I can separate myself from the elements emotionally, that is when I get the shot.”

A Look Inside Claire Rosen’s Spellbinding “Imaginarium”

Claire Rosen. Imperial Moth Caterpillar with Imperial Blue No. 5043, 2017.

Claire Rosen. The Budgie Feast, 2014.

Claire Rosen. Still Life Study in Lismore Gold.

“Imagination is more important than knowledge,” no less than Albert Einstein observed. “For knowledge is limited, whereas imagination embraces the entire world, stimulating progress, and giving birth to evolution.”

Imagination holds the key to possibility, the very impetus that has made humankind a miraculous species. Within the infinite expanses of the mind exists anything we can dream up at any time. It is here, in this netherworld that we take flight, creating something out of nothing, and potentially bringing it to life.

In her exhibition, Imaginarium, at United Photo Industries, Brooklyn, earlier this year, American photographer Claire Rosen reminded us of just how vast our ingenious flights of fancy can be. Combining a selection of images and installations from the series Fantastical Feasts, Birds of Feather, Nostalgia: A Study in Color, The Traveling Mouse, and Persephone’s Feast, Rosen took us into a storybook world that we won’t soon forget.

The Photo Exhibition Holding Things Together in “This Synthetic Moment”

JAMES BARNOR. NIFA NIFA, 1974.
Lambda print, 27 3/5 x 27 3/5 in 70 x 70 cm.
Courtesy the artist and October Gallery, London.

LIZ JOHNSON ARTUR. Untitled, 2016.
Printed 2018, adhesive vinyl. © Liz Johnson Artur.
Courtesy the artist and David Nolan Gallery, New York.

KWAME BRATHWAITE. Untitled (Photo shoot at a school for one of the many
modeling groups who had begun to embrace natural hairstyles in the 1960s) c. 1966.
Printed 2017, archival pigment print 15 x 15 in 38.1 x 38.1 cm.
Courtesy the artist and Cherry and Martin, Los Angeles

Though we may obsess about the past or the future, alternately consumed by all that is not, the primacy of the present forever asserts itself. We almost always believe that the times in which we live are the precipice to a cataclysmic fall, a tipping point to some greater tragedy, a moment when all can slip away and be lost. Ours is, as photographer David Hartt observed, “A crisis of borders, a fold in time, a rupture in space.”

With this in mind, Hartt sets out to curate a photography exhibition that speaks to our times. This Synthetic Moment at David Nolan, New York, brought together the works of Liz Johnson Artur, James Barnor, Kwame Brathwaite, David Hartt, Zoe Leonard, and Christopher Williams to explore, in Hartt’s words, “pictures of power and pride and grief and desire and confusion and community and celebration and abandonment.”

Each of the artists featured sharesd their own vision of the world, one that speaks to the others included in the exhibition in a dialogue that made us aware of the ways in which photography can shape the discourse without ever saying a word.

The Print Swap Comes to Berlin in a New Photo Exhibition

The Crying Window © Anne Closuit Eisenhart (@lesfifoles), Brooklyn, NY

Steam Streets © Erica Reade (@ericareadeimages), Brooklyn, NY

Alexa Becker, the Acquisitions Editor for photography and art books at the influential publisher Kehrer Verlag, has selected 30 images from The Print Swap collection to be part of our upcoming exhibition at BERLIN BLUE art. This will be the fifth-ever Print Swap show and the first in Europe. All photographers who participate in The Print Swap give and receive a print; the project connects photographers across genres and thousands of miles. A different guest curator and industry leader chooses approximately 25-40 images for each of our exhibitions. We invite all photographers to submit here.

The Berlin Print Swap exhibition includes photographers from throughout the United States, England, Italy, Greece, Portugal, Germany, Spain, Sweden, Norway, Austria, Russia, and Australia. Through Becker’s selections, we travel from megacities to the vast wilderness and back again; in the spirit of the swap, we find unlikely visual cues tying together dissimilar places. When seen from above, Navid Baraty’s geometric New York City echoes Shannon Kerr’s feral Grand Canyon; Damien Drew looks out a window in Japan to see a concrete maze, while Marc Schindl peers into his rearview mirror to discover an endless landscape, set on fire by the light of the sun. Anne Closuit Eisenhart and John Duke Kisch capture worlds abstracted by rain and condensation, while Nelson Miranda and Alberto Blanco photograph underpasses more than 10,000 kilometers apart.

Please note that we are currently accepting submissions for our next exhibition, taking place early this fall in Hyderabad, India, as part of The Indian Photography Festival (IPF) by the Light Craft Foundation. The world-renowned photojournalist Ami Vitale will curate the show. Submit to The Print Swap here. As always, it costs $40/image to be included. We cover printing and shipping. All photographers who submit will participate in the worldwide exchange, and Vitale will select a total of 25 images to include in this next exhibition. Submit today!

Hallucinogenic Photos of the California Wilderness

Psychscape 69 (Tonopah, NV), 2017

Psychscape 18 (Banner Ridge, CA), 2017

Terri Loewenthal keeps her methods closely-guarded, but she is willing to admit a few things about her chimerical photographs of California. First, they are all made in camera with filters. Second, they are single exposures. Third, they were made when she was physically in wild landscapes, not in a studio, removed from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Up becomes down; earth erupts into color; the horizon extends forever.

15 Years of Haunting Landscape Photos

As Light Falls #8 (2015) © Nicholas Hughes

In Darkness Visible (Verse I) #14 (2007) © Nicholas Hughes

Field (Verse I) #3 (2008) © Nicholas Hughes

Nowhere Far, a monograph by the photographer Nicolas Hughes (GOST Books), spans six series and fifteen years of large-format work, hand-printed in the darkroom. Rooted in the traditions of Romanticism and Pictorialism, the book slips into the outer edges of abstraction, displacing us in vast expanses of land, sea, and sky. In Hughes’s world, the ground blurs and moves; he freezes waves and stretches the boundaries between heaven and earth almost to the point of breaking.

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