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Posts tagged: documentary photography

Haunting Series Documents Painful Reminders of the First World War

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Soldier’s grave Champagne: This helmet atop a wooden cross marking the the battlefield grave of a French poilu Edouard Ivaldi is the last such marker anywhere on the Western Front.

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Tyne Cot: The largest Commonwealth War Graves Cemetery in the world with almost 12,000 graves and a memorial to another 35,000 men with unknown graves.
“I have many times asked myself whether there can be more potent advocates of peace upon earth through the years to come than this massed multitude of silent witnesses to the desolation of war” King George V during a visit in 1922

One hundred summers ago this year, the First World War began, setting of a chain of battles that would claim some 16 million lives over the course of four years. For Fields of Battle, Lands of Peace 14-18, photographer Michael St Maur Sheil returns to the Western front, cataloguing its landscapes as they exist today. In contrast to the vast majority World War I photographs picturing renowned generals and bloodied soldiers black and white, Sheil presents a topography healed in part by the passage time and a century’s growth of verdure.

The Incredible Story of a Group of Orphans and Their Adopted Dogs

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In a riverside concrete amphitheater in Dhaka, Bangladesh, a community of young street children live with their beloved stray dogs. Separated from their parents or orphaned in the slums of Dhaka, the boys forge a close-knit family with their adopted animals. This is Robindra Shorbod, a park where the kids gather and sell recyclable plastic containers for food, which they unfailingly share with their ten devoted canine companions, Tiger, Romeo, Bullet, Kula, Moti, Michael, Tom, Jax, Lalu, and Bagha.

Photo du Jour: ‘A Sunny Place for Shady People’

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Drenched in sunshine and suburbia, Ying Ang‘s Gold Coast is brimming with images we come to expect from Australia. Despite its sweeping aesthetic, the series is drowning in darkness, an ominous truth lying in wait in the city’s quiet streets. Once labelled a tourist capital, the Gold Coast region has become infamously named the crime capital of Australia. Ang herself was a significant witness to a double murder attempted suicide, exposed at a young age to the seedy underbelly of the place she calls home.

Garry Winogrand, a Godfather of Street Photography, Takes NYC with Simultaneous Exhibitions

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Central Park Zoo, New York, 1967 © Garry Winogrand. Collection of Randi and Bob Fisher

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Los Angeles, 1964 © Garry Winogrand. San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Gift of Jeffrey Fraenkel

Garry Winogrand

Los Angeles, 1980-83 © Garry Winogrand. The Garry Winogrand Archive, Center for Creative Photography, The University of Arizona

With a widely-reviewed, massive exhibition now at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, Bronx-born photographer Garry Winogrand has been given his first American retrospective in 25 years. The exhibition, which debuted last year at SFMoMA, then traveling to the National Gallery of Art, is on view now through September 21, 2014. At the same time, Rick Wester Fine Art and Pace/MacGill, both in NYC, are also mounting shows of Winogrand’s work. All three exhibitions, to varying degrees, feature lesser-known images along with the well-known favorites. The Met is also exhibiting posthumous and never-before-seen prints from Winogrand’s behemoth archive—he shot 26,000 rolls of film over the course of his lifetime. Winogrand begun working as a photographer only after enrolling at Columbia University on the G.I. Bill to study painting, first serving in the military as a weather forecaster. He lived a relatively short life, especially for one so productive, dying suddenly at the age of 56 in 1984.

Photo du Jour: A Baptism in New Dehli

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© Gary S. Chapman / Offset

The country of India has a dense population of just over 1.2 billion individuals, the overwhelming majority practicing Hindus. Christianity ranks as the 3rd largest religion, an minuscule number given that only 2.3% claim to be Protestant. Photojournalist Gary S. Chapman captures a “new believer” of the Christian faith being baptized in New Dehli.

Letting It All Hang Out: Motoyuki Daifu’s ‘Project Family’ Shows the Messy Inner Workings of His Family Home

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Motoyuki Daifu

Having become accustomed to seeing the edited versions of people’s lives on Facebook, Instagram, etc., Yokohama-based photographer Motoyuki Daifu’s photos, glaringly honest to the point of hilarity, of his crowded and messy family home are even more jarring. An exhibition of work from Project Family, subtitled as “The family is a pubis, so I cover it with pretty panties,” opens at Little Big Man Gallery in Los Angeles on July 19.

Photo du Jour: Pet Reindeer

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Often referred to as the strangest town in Alaska, Whittier houses the vast majority of its 200 residents in a single 14 floor building, in which neighbors are known to walk about in their pajamas. The unique and close-knit town is only accessible during the day by a 2.6 mile tunnel running through the adjacent Maynard Mountain. For her series City Under One Roof, photographer Jen Kinney catalogues daily life in the community she calls home.

Photographer Is Offered a Baby for $50, Raises $50,000 to End Human Trafficking

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Photographer Tanner Stewart can pinpoint the moment that irrevocably changed his life with a single black and white photograph of a 6 month old baby. While volunteering in Bulgaria in 2012 for the A21 Campaign, a non-profit geared towards ending human trafficking, he saw a man carrying a child, whom he photographed. After the image was taken, the man offered to sell his infant to Stewart for $50. Stunned by the immediate exposure to the global crisis of human trafficking, the artist redirected his career to focus on the cause.

A Photographer’s Poignant Self-Portrait Series Examines Her Own Journey with Multiple Sclerosis

Patricia Lay-Dorsey

Patricia Lay-Dorsey

Human frailty is an unavoidable, fundamental part of life. It’s a given that at some point, something will happen to each one of us that demonstrates this. A beautiful examination of this is the Detroit-based photographer Patricia Lay-Dorsey‘s Falling into Place, a thoughtful, touching series of self-portraits of her daily life twenty years after having been diagnosed with chronic progressive multiple sclerosis. 

Powerful Photo Series Documents the Final Generation of Foot Binding in China

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For Living History, photographer Jo Farrell paints a stark yet complex portrait of China’s now-illegal practice of foot binding. Fueled by her desire to photograph traditions and peoples forgotten by the modern age, she began the series with Zhang Yun Ying, one of the few living women with bound feet. Since then, Farrell has returned every year to the village of the 88-year-old peasant farmer, creating a visual diary of a recent history on the brink of vanishing from our collective memory.