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Posts tagged: documentary photography

Surreal Photographs of Life Along China’s Coastline

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China has 9,010 miles of coastline. It passes through ten provinces and 25 major cities. In the latest project from Zhangxiao, the Chinese freelance photographer presents images from every province and nearly every city near the sea. “I’ve been longing for the sea since my childhood, when my family lived in a village about 40 kilometers from the nearest seaside,” Zhang remembers, “My family couldn’t afford to travel to the seaside and for a child 40 kilometers was far, far away.”

Intimacy, Love, and the Aging Body: Photographer Marna Clarke Documents Her Life Over 70 (NSFW)

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Marna Clarke

What happens when a photographer gives up photographing for 14 years? In the case of Marin-based photographer Marna Clarke, she returns to it after her partner Igor put a camera back in her hands. After a few years of fine art work, she began work on You’re Not Getting Any Younger when she was 70, unveiling private moments shared with the man who had encouraged her. By turning her lens inward, Clarke takes ownership of her body, not only as a woman but also as a human being coming to terms with aging. In a world that too often denies the sensual desires of those past middle age, she both validates and celebrates the joys and sorrows of the maturing self, riding each emotional tide with determination, frankness, and grace. She spoke to us in detail about her journey.

Our Latest Group Show Examines the Powerful – and Often Tragic – Pull of Addiction

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Joker © Michele Selway

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Daivd, Melbourne, 2014 © Harrison Moss

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The New Drug © Luis Octavio Silva Hoyos

While most of us think of drugs and alcohol when it comes to addiction, our latest group show reveals that this affliction can take many different forms.

“Addiction is a difficult thing to present honestly and subtly. We’ve all been bombarded with over-the-top images of addiction in movies and TV: the strung-out addict, the violent spouse, the jaded junkie. We chose Octavio, Harrison and Michele’s photos because they put a human face on addiction, subtly showing us how various addictions, from drugs to cigarettes to cell phones, creep into our lives and slowly change us.” Says the team behind Narratively. Together they have selected an inspired and confronting collection of work submitted by Feature Shoot readers.

Congratulations to Michele Selway, Harrison Moss, and Luis Octavio Silva Hoyos, who will receive a one-year subscription to Squarespace, the innovative website publishing platform perfect for the creative. They make it simple to create professional website that are 100% customizable, making web design accessible to everyone. Complete with award-winning designs, hosting, domains, commerce, and 24/7 support, Squarespace offers photographers more ways to market themselves and grow their business.

Water Sliding in India

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© Elijah Solomon Hurwitz / Offset

To see more of Elijah Solomon Hurwitz’s work, please visit Offset.

Offset is an exclusive category channel partner on Feature Shoot.

Images of a Russian City Destroyed by Modern Construction

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Known as “the town of seven hills”, the city of Cheboksary, Russia is rolling with ridges and ravines that scatter local landmarks and housing across the uneven landscape. At just under 500,000 citizens, Cheboksary has seen a radical change in the last ten years due to overbuilding and thoughtless use of the land, leaving a dangerous and irrevocably altered region in its wake. Photographer Sergey Novikov documents the curious phenomenon in his series Most Frequently Visited Hills and Ravines.

Photographer Captures Everyday Life Inside ‘The City of Children’

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The City of Children, located in the outskirts of Budapest, Hungary, is a housing facility for children seeking help from their dysfunctional and poverty-stricken families. New York based photographer Monika Merva, a first generation American of Hungarian descent, has been returning here over the course of seven years to document the everyday life of the children who have made this place their home. Merva’s interest in portraiture, children and her desire to help others through photography, led her to meet with the director of the children’s home. It wasn’t until a year later that she gained permission to photograph there in what would become her series, The City of Children.

Behind the Scenes Photos of a Marijuana Grow House

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© Benjamin Rasmussen / Offset

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© Benjamin Rasmussen / Offset

Since 2012, when the sale and possession of recreational marijuana was legalized in Colorado, Denver-based photographer Benjamin Rasmussen has been ahead of the story, capturing all goes on behind the scenes in grow houses and retail stores for major media platforms like The Guardian, CNN, The New York Times, Wired, and The Wall Street Journal.

Confronting Photos Reveal What Happens After We Die

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For About Dying, Denmark-based photographer Cathrine Ertmann chronicles the enigmatical journey of the deceased from death until burial. While keeping her subjects’ identities anonymous, she records the stages of death, including autopsies and cremations, in quiet detail. Lifting the veil of secrecy that so often surrounds these processes, she reveals moments that are both graphic and serene.

Rescued from Oblivion: Magnum Photographers Release Obscure Images for Print Sale

USA. Brooklyn, NY. 1992.
Alessandra Sanguinetti. USA. Brooklyn, NY. 1992
I took this photograph, “The couple” in the summer of ’92. That was long ago when everything and everyone still felt endlessly fascinating and mysterious, and when photography was the only way I could take it all in. I’d left Buenos Aires to spend the summer in Brooklyn with my grandfather and spent every day roaming the city taking pictures and hurrying back home at night, excited to develop the film in the blacked out laundry room. I distinctly remember uncurling the wet film this frame was in, seeing it and being in awe at how a portrait could transcend anything I had seen or intended. —Alessandra Sanguinetti

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Jonas Bendiksen Georgia. Abkhazia. Sukhum. 2005.
One of the absurd things about photography is the amount of pictures one takes that end up in a box, never to be seen again. Nearly all of the images I’ve ever taken have ended up unseen in a box. I took this image in Abkhazia in 2005, while I was working on my book “Satellites.” It shows girls doing their hair in front of a bombed out apartment block. It was a sweet little human moment. But later that same evening I took another image of an old woman walking in front of the same building that was slightly more dramatic. And just like that, the image of the four girls had to go. —Jonas Bendiksen

A few months ago, Magnum photographers challenged each other to dig up a single photograph that they have always liked, but for one reason or another, has gone unpublished and/or to some extent unnoticed. The photographers explored the depths of their attics and hard drives for an image that they wanted to give new life.

On November 10th, these photos were made available as signed, $100 #MAGNUMSquare Prints in their online store. On November 14th at 5PM (EST), orders will close and the prints will be signed.

Thought-Provoking Portraits of Americans in Debt

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Debt Portrait #30, Harrison Township, MI 2014
Michele Manis, Housekeeper / Artist, $35,000 in debt. I accumulated this last round of debt after paying off a large amount at 23. I acquired most of the debt when I went back to college. The rest was from mail order catalogs and robbing Peter to pay Paul, or so they say, to get through during times of homelessness.

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Debt Portrait #22, Portland, OR 2014
August Golden, 27 years old, non-profit care provider. I am currently about $30,000 in debt from a credit card used to pay for college in California. I have been paying this off slowly and likely will continue for a long time. Or maybe I’ll declare bankruptcy.

For millions of Americans, being in debt is a lonely experience, a circumstance that is kept hidden and negotiated over the phone with anonymous creditors and loan agencies. For Californian photographer Brittany M. Powell, her debt was a call to action. Following the financial crisis of 2008, she lost work, accrued debt, and ultimately filed for bankruptcy. Debt, she explains, has become so stigmatized in our society that it can be easy to forget just how many people are suffering in silence. The Debt Project, in which she photographs people in debt, is her way of illuminating the extent to which this issue affects individual lives as well as the larger framework of our society.