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Posts tagged: documentary photography

Revealing the Cruelty of Bear Bile Farming, in Photos

A rescued Malayan sun bear at Free the Bears sanctuary in Cambodia © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

A newly rescued Asiatic moon bear. The bear is missing both front paws. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur will never forget the day she met Miracle the Asiatic moon bear in Vietnam in 2008.

Miracle had lived eight years in a bear bile farm, where the animals are forced to live in small cages and undergo repeated invasive extractions. The bear had just been saved by Animals Asia and brought to their rescue center in Tam Dao, but the signs of her former trauma were plainly visible. The bars on her cage were rusted shut, and the top of her head was covered in calluses, a result of many hours spent rubbing her head against the bars in frustration and despair.

A Rare Look Behind-the-Scenes at Veal and Dairy Farms

A calf looks up, still wet from birth. © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

A calf strains his head outside the bars of a crate enclosure while another lies dead next to him. © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

In 2010, photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur took a tour of a dairy farm in Spain. She saw farmers pull a calf from her inside her mother, and when the young cow was just 20 minutes old, she saw the young animal placed in a wheelbarrow and separated from her mother. The farmer named the newborn calf Jo-Anne, in the photographer’s honor.

The Suffering of Animals Farmed for Fur, in Photos

Calico fox in a fur farm in Europe © Jo-Anne McArthur / The Ghosts In Our Machine

Injured mink kits with their dead mother at a fur farm © Jo-Anne McArthur / Djurattsalliansen

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur usually smells a fur farm before she sees it. Her eyes water; her nose runs. It’s not just the smell of run-off from the feces; as she puts it, “Animals will emit specific scents when they’re afraid.”

The Horrific Truth About Pigs in Factory Farms

A sow looks out between the bars of her gestation crate © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

Piglet fetuses in a dumpster © Jo-Anne McArthur / Essere Animali

When photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur documents life inside a factory farm, she doesn’t touch a thing. She usually doesn’t have permission from the owners, and she enters at night with a security team. She has never broken anything, and she leaves the location exactly as she found it. She’s there to tell the truth, and that truth is worth running the risk of trespassing fines, and in some cases, bodily harm.

Intimate Photos of Basquiat as a Young Man

Basquiat in the apartment, 1981. Photograph by Alexis Adler.

Refrigerator in the apartment, c. 1979–1980. Photograph by Alexis Adler.

Before Jean-Michel Basquiat was known by name, his work had already hit the streets of New York. Writing under the name SAMO©, Basquiat and partner Al Diaz co-opted the means of graffiti to build street cred and fame but they took it a step further by adding tongue-in-cheek turns of phrase in bold block letters. By avoiding the highly stylistic letterforms of graffiti writers, SAMO© made it clear: they wanted to be read, known, and understood. Theirs was a message to the people of New York.

Beautiful Images of the Arctic Expose a Darker Truth

The Arctic is melting faster than any other place in the world. NY City-based photographer Diane Tuft set out to document the area before the effects of global warming cause this landscape to vanish forever. During the summers of 2015 and 2016, Tuft travelled by plane, boat and helicopter to photograph the mountain glaciers of Svalbard, Norway, the Arctic Ocean’s sea ice and the ice bergs and ice sheet of Greenland witnessing for herself the incredible beauty and fragility of the region.

Call for Entries: The RPS International Photography Exhibition

Rose in a Fox Mask © Melanie Eclare

Abrigo Corner 1 © Tom Blachford

The International Photography Exhibition by The Royal Photographic Society has been a fixture of the photography community since 1854, just fifteen years after the invention and introduction of practical photography. Now in it’s 160th year, the IPE is the single longest-running photography competition of its kind, allowing contemporary photographers to follow in the footsteps of early exhibitors like Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Steichen, and Roger Fenton.

For this year’s worldwide call for submissions, the RPS has once again opened its doors to photographers of all backgrounds, working in all genres. As always, there is no fixed theme, making IPE one of the most consistently diverse photography exhibitions in the world.

The Iconic 1940s Photographer Who Never Wanted to Be Famous

“LaSalle at Amsterdam” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

“125th Street” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

The photographs arrived at The Curator Gallery in a box meant for curator Bill Shapiro, the former editor of Life magazine. When he saw the first few pictures, the curator wondered if he could possibly be looking at the work of a Life photographer he didn’t recognize. He had never heard of the man behind the hundred-some images inside the box.

As it turned out, the package had been left for him by Betsy Evans, a friend of the late photographer Todd Webb, who left behind an extensive archive. Though the elusive photographer had never been at Life, Webb shared a time, a place, and a sensibility with those who had. He was friends with Life staffer Gordon Parks. He also worked and played alongside Walker Evans, Ansel Adams, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott, and Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O’Keeffe.

One Photographer’s Fight for the Hudson River in New York

“This is our Standing Rock,” photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood says of the Hudson River.

Photos of the Last Remaining American Drive-In Theaters

Frontier Drive-In, Center, Colorado. Abandoned
“The Frontier Drive-In was possibly my favorite location that in hindsight I wish I had given more time to. As we drove down this long highway surrounded by nothing, we were heading straight towards the biggest rain cloud I have ever seen. As soon as we had the theatre in our sights, the torrential rain started. My assistant and I sat in the car for nearly an hour, until finally we got a 10-minute break in the rain.”

East Hartford Drive-In, South Windsor, Connecticut. Abandoned
“The shoot at East Hartford was very special because I got to create a photograph that had been in my head since the beginning of this project. I found a model who also had an amazing vintage car he was willing to drive back into the unmaintained lot. Of course it started to rain as soon as we arrived, so I had to work quickly, but we were able to create one of my favorite images from the trip.”

In the summer of 2014, Portland photographer Lindsey Rickert packed up her life and hit the road in search of drive-in movie theaters around the county. Some had been closed and deserted; others had adapted to a swiftly-changing market and were still in business. In total, she spent over two months in her car, traversing an estimated 12,022 miles across the United States.

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