Menu

Posts tagged: documentary photography

The Sorrow and Grace of Abandoned Cats, in Photos

“I remember having the clear feeling that I was taking photos of people,” Italian photographer Sabrina Boem tells me of her first encounter with stray and abandoned cats. “I remember human eyes that talked to me. I loved those cats, their eyes, the way they looked at me.”

The Grace & Magic of Rural Living, in Photos

Electric Current © Andrew Heiser, Los Angeles, CA

German Pastoral Study #1, from the series Divine Animals: The Bovidae © R. J. Kern, Minneapolis, MN

Dinner Time © Michael Knapstein, Middleton, Wisconsin

Last summer, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a worldwide project for photographers. Here’s how it works: you can submit by tagging your photos #theprintswap. Every day, we curate submissions, and we notify photographers who have been selected. It’s free to submit, but winners pay a one-time fee of $40 per image. We cover shipping and printing, which is done by our friends at Skink Ink in Brooklyn, New York. Prints are then mailed out randomly across the globe, and every participating photographer receives a surprise print from one of their peers.

In recent weeks, we’ve been looking over The Print Swap archive and putting together online group shows with the pictures in the collection. In the past, we’ve explored themes like New Topographics, Seascapes, and the American West. Here, a collection of some of our favorite photographs of life in rural places.

Painful, Beautiful, Unforgettable Photos from the ACT UP Community

Jon Greenberg (1956-1993), ACT UP Alternative and Holistic Treatment Committee, 2/16/1992

Porchlight (Jay Funk & Mark Harrington), Saugerties, NY, 7/24/1993

In May of 1988, the great activist Vito Russo gave his speech ‘Why We Fight’ at an ACT UP (the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power) demonstration. Throughout, he compared living with AIDS to living through war: every week for the previous four years, he had attended two funerals a week.

In the end, he concluded, it was “worse” than a war because the public and the government didn’t “give a shit.” In 1989, 14,544 people were killed. Policy-makers remained silent. Some actively opposed the spread of awareness and educational tools. Russo died the following year.

After joining ACT UP in 1989, the photographer Stephen Barker witnessed the crisis firsthand. He was part of the life-saving (and once-illegal) needle exchange program in New York City. Looking back, he describes himself and his colleagues as “foot soldiers” for the cause.

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at ‘Terrorist Rehab’ in Saudi Arabia

A classroom for members of the jail is lined with desks. Even though the desks are new, the participants have scratched their names, dates, hearts, and slogans into the wood. The black seats with wooden desks reminded me of a line of black clad IS members carrying kalashnikovs. At Al-Ha’ir prison, I had to use the prison’s camera and wasn’t allowed to take photos of any of the staff or inmates, which left me to photograph the evidence left behind by the inmates. I photographed some of the etchings in the wood, but the prison censored these photos. © David Degner/Getty Images

Inmates have a small area with astroturf to enjoy the sun at the end of each cell block. The Ha’ir prison is primarily for terrorists, we are told. Talking to human rights activists, however, gives the impression that there are different departments with different standards. Political prisoners sometimes come to Ha’ir, but hardly in the comfortable cells jihadists have. While the writers were interviewing another inmate under supervision, I was able to talk with some inmates alone. They saw many new inmates arrive after the bombing of Shia mosques in the eastern provinces in May 2015 and felt they were arrested randomly. As one inmate said, there is always the official story and then the unofficial story which they won’t let us see. But he said he couldn’t go into details. © David Degner/Getty Images

The Family House is designed like a boutique hotel with all the amenities for a family visit. The suites allow inmates to live with their family for short periods of time while incarcerated. The families and inmates arrive in chauffeured cars with the hotel logo; guests are given a key for their rooms, and the all female staff cares for them during their stay. © David Degner/Getty Images

In May of last year, Cairo photographer David Degner and Swiss journalist Monika Bolliger traveled to the Al-Ha’ir Prison in Saudi Arabia to see the living conditions of men who had been incarcerated on terrorism-related charges.

These ‘State-Approved’ Photos from North Korea Reveal a Complex Truth

In a diorama at the Sinchon Museum of American War Atrocities, U.S. soldiers are depicted driving a nail into a Korean woman’s head. The regime uses the museum’s gory displays to foster an unsubstantiated narrative that American-led forces massacred 35,000 civilians in Sinchon in 1950.

Meticulously choreographed military parades. Strident news announcements on state television. Missile tests presided over by a grinning Kim Jong Un. Propaganda from North Korea comes to us fully formed and almost alluring in its opacity: a finished product that has been carefully constructed to convey an idealized image of strength and unity.

Carl De Keyzer, a photographer based in Belgium, offers a different and more intimate view: a glimpse of the process of indoctrination within North Korea. From their first day in kindergarten, children are spoon-fed propaganda—from lectures about the legendary feats of Kim Il Sung to field trips to a museum that depicts, in gruesome detail, Americans massacring Koreans. What makes the images all the more remarkable is that De Keyzer was subject to the same restrictions imposed on foreign tourists who visit North Korea. During his four trips to the country over the past two years, he was attended at all times by official minders, and had to submit his photos for state approval.

A Poetic Reminder of What Korea Used to Be Like

Described by ICP curator Christopher Phillips as “the long-lost Korean cousin of Magnum photographers such as Henri-Cartier Bresson” is the lesser known Han Youngsoo.

South Korea’s rapid economic development during the past half century is unprecedented. The country went from being one of the poorest countries in the world to being the 4th largest economy in Asia. Han Youngsoo was one of the few artists working during that time to document the country that was soon to change beyond recognition; his photographs transport the viewer back to a time when Seoul was an impoverished city, devastated by the Korean war.

Marvin E. Newman’s Spellbinding “City of Lights”

Broadway, 1954.

Feast Of San Gennaro, Little Italy, New York, 1952.

Coney Island, 1953

Now in his 89th year, American photographer Marvin E. Newman is receiving his due as one of the finest street photographers of the twentieth century. His self-titled monograph, just released as a XXL Collector’s Edition from Taschen showcases his vibrant collection of cityscapes made in New York, Chicago, Las Vegas, and Los Angeles—as well as in the Heartland of the nation and the outskirts of Alaska between the years 1950 and 1983.

Born in the Bronx in 1927, Newman studied photography and sculpture at Brooklyn College with Walter Rosenblum. He joined the Photo League in 1948 before moving to Chicago the following year to study with Harry Callahan and Aaron Siskind at the Institute of Design. “They taught you to keep your mind open and go further, and always respond to what you are making,” Newman remembered.

65 Photos from The Print Swap Are Coming to Photoville!

‘A Broken Pulsar’ © Fili Olsefski, Athens, Greece

‘Down by the Station’ © Steffen Tuck, Brisbane, Australia

‘Havana by Night’ © Eric Hsu, New York, NY

Last year, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a way to connect photographers around the world. The rules are simple: anyone can submit by using the hashtag #theprintswap on Instagram. If your image is selected, it’s printed by the experts at Skink Ink in Brooklyn before being mailed across the world and landing on the doorstep of another winner. Every winning photographer gives a print, and every winning photographer receives a print too. Pieces are mailed out randomly, so it’s always a fun surprise to see who ends up with which print.

Since its inception, The Print Swap has received more than 45,000 submissions. Curators Alison Zavos and Julia Sabot have selected more than 2,500 winning images. Over the past two months, they’ve also considered all incoming submissions and handpicked 65 of them to show at the first ever Print Swap exhibition, opening in September at Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photoville, the largest annual photography event in New York City and, will include 70+ exhibitions this year, all installed in repurposed shipping containers-turned-galleries.

This is truly an international exhibition. Zavos and Sabot chose pictures from photographers working in twenty countries around the world. But more than that, this collection represents a wide range of practices, genres, and methods. There’s film; there’s digital. There’s classic black and white and vibrant, artificial color.

These photographers find reverence, dignity, and whimsy in humans and animals alike. Jake Green photographs Sonja Usher, an actor playing the role of the Archbishop of Canterbury in a production of Shakespeare’s Henry V. Kristen Bartley introduces us to Picasso, a dog whose name presumably comes from the slightly off-kilter structure of his face. Even uninhabited places, like Steffen Tuck’s Australian subway station or Bonita Chan’s reflected Hong Kong carousel, seem to thrum with life.

For all the beauty, there are also echoes of urgency and loss that color and illuminate corners of this exhibition. Aleksandra Dynas meets children living in the streets of Uganda, where over ten thousand young people go without food, shelter, education and medical care. Many work in demolition and do jobs on trucks, and the littlest ones collect metal and plastic. Yusni Aziz encounters a young resident of the Kampung Akuarium in Jakarta sitting in his “dream house,” a thoughtfully designed and decorated fisherman’s boat, after families in the area were evicted and their homes were razed to the ground.

Here, you’ll find all the participating photographers showing work at The Print Swap exhibition at Photoville. We hope you’ll visit in person between September 13-24, 2017. After all, these prints were meant to be seen in real life, hanging on a wall. As always, The Print Swap is open for submissions. Find more details on our website, and check in at @theprintswap on Instagram, where we regularly share winning images. Thank you to everyone to submitted work this time around. We love seeing your images.

Enter The 2017 PhotogrVphy Grant for a Chance at $1000

Images © Drew Nikonowicz, Elena Anosova, Matt Hamon

PhotogrVphy Magazine established the annual $1000 PhotogrVphy Grant to support photographers working across genres around the world. Every year, they welcome an international jury of editors, curators, publishers, agents, gallerists, academics to select winners who fit into five broad but distinct categories. This year’s categories are Architecture, Conceptual, Nature, Photojournalism, and Culture.

Humankind’s Bizarre Relationship with Nature, In Photos

Victoria Crowned Pigeon, The National Aviary, Pittsburgh

Zebras, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh

In the last four years, Emma Kisiel has spent a great deal of her time in natural history museums throughout the United States, perched outside of the dioramas featuring taxidermied animals. The children who visit with their parents often asked similar questions:”Are these real animals?” The parents, Kisiel reports, usually gave ambiguous answers. They might say, “They were real. Now they’re not” or “They’re not real. They’re dead.”

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get some visual inspiration into your day!