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Posts tagged: animal photography

The Magic and Mythos of the Faroe Islands (Sponsored)

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© Kevin Faingnaert / Offset

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© Oscar Bjarnason / Image Source / Offset

Offset Artist Kevin Faingnaert will never forget the day he met Simun Hanssen, a resident of Svinoy, one of the remotest of the Faroe Islands. Hanssen, a retired sailor, lived alongside only eleven other people on this enchanted island, spending his time searching for messages in bottles, washed ashore from faraway places. He had love letters, poems, drawings sent by strangers; some he had contacted, when the glass bottles included addresses from Norway, Canada, Scotland, or Iceland.

Fat Cats Star in Irresistible Photos

luigi-4273“Luigi’s a short-haired tabby that I’ve had for over 9 years, and he’s been in a bad mood for most of that time.”

evie“Evie is a mild mannered cat who enjoys chasing shadows and eating the finest pate.”

Cats can be difficult to photograph. Pete Thorne learned that the hard way.

The first cat to sit in his portrait studio fled behind the washing machine and refused to come out; the second squeezed under his couch. From that point on, the photographer understood: he could photograph cats, but he had to do it on their own terms.

Tender Photos of the Bond Between Children and Animals

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Ana Rosenberg isn’t interested in the “rules” of photography. Her coming of age story, starring her two children, is at once timeless and fleeting.

15 Photoville Exhibitions We Can’t Wait to See

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© Sophie Gamand

There’s nothing like Photoville. For New York City’s single largest annual photography event, United Photo Industries has repurposed over sixty shipping containers, transforming them into miniature art galleries lining Brooklyn Bridge Park.

Part of what makes Photoville so unique is it’s diversity, and this year’s lineup touches on the most pressing topics of our time: climate change, human rights, and yes, even animal rights. From photographer Sophie Gamand’s pit bull adoption event, where visitors can meet their new best friend, to the unforgettable and deeply human work of the late Chris Hondros and other conflict photographs who followed in his footsteps, Photoville 2016 takes us around the world and back home again, reminding us of the power photography has always held while pointing to a future none of us can predict.

We put together this list of 15 exhibitions we’re most excited to see, ranging from the clever to the profound and everything in between. Photoville opens today at 4:00 PM.

EXHIBITION: Flower Power, September 21 – 25, 2016.
Presented by Sophie Gamand.
The photography of Sophie Gamand has saved the lives of countless shelter dogs, including pit bull type dogs, who are euthanized across the country more frequently than any other kind of dog (about one million per year) due to prejudice and stereotypes. By dressing homeless pit bulls in flower crowns, Gamand has not only helped to further the worldwide movement against breed-based discrimination and legislation, but she has also encouraged people to adopt many of the gentle creatures featured in her portraits. Photoville 2016 marks the artist’s first solo exhibition in the United States, and to celebrate the occasion some of her canine models will be joining her for a very Special Flower Power Dog Adoption event. All will be on the lookout for loving homes in the crowd.

Incredibly Intricate Mandalas Honoring Dead Animals

Fleur Alston

Fleur Alston

In her series Kit and Caboodle, English artist Fleur Alston creates incredibly intricate collage mandalas, a dead animal at the center of each. The mandala, “a spiritual and ritual symbol in Hinduism and Buddhism that represent[s] the Universe,” serves as a memorial to the animal that the artist has happened upon, and symbolizes balance, a cycle, life, and death.

Intimate Photographs of Tiny Creatures in Human Hands

Tamara Lischka

Tamara Lischka

When I first saw these photographs by Portland artist Tamara Lischka, I wasn’t sure if what I was looking at was real. I wondered how these images were made, how the artist had access to the bodies of these creatures, which looked to me at times human, animal, alien, and even manmade or sculptural, perfectly formed and packed with detail.

Photos That Capture the Souls of Sheep and Goats

Opie No. 1

Opie No. 1

Lily No. 1

Lily No. 1

Most of Kevin Horan’s goats and sheep have stories. There’s Sydney, who was “a star,” and Poppy, who was beautiful but “so not into it” with the camera. The photographer worked with with local farm, rescues, and sanctuaries near his studio in Washington, where he has been since 2007, to make classic, stirring portraits of the animals in their care.

Exploring the Complex Relationship Between Humans and Animals

Jayanti Seiler

Jayanti Seiler

I distinctly remember seeing Florida artist Jayanti Seiler’s series, Of One and The Other, and thinking it was one of the most striking, poignant, beautiful photographic projects I’d seen in a long time. The images of people in a variety of settings interacting with and often embracing animals, living and dead, nearly brought me to tears; they are such moving photos of moments that feel authentic and heartfelt, fraught with the complex emotions of the relationships humans share with animals today.

Uncovering 60+ Years of Work by One Historic Photographer

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“One project lasted his whole lifetime,” gallerist Daniel Cooney says of Len Speier, the 88-year-old artist who has devoted decades to capturing life on the streets, in the clubs, at the parks of New York City, Europe, and Asia. His life and career was never broken into chapters or series; it’s a single long strand connecting who he was as a young man to who he his today.

The Unparalleled Joy of Dogs on the Beach (Sponsored)

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Magnolia, Massachusetts © Cavan Images / Offset

“A dog can never tell you what she knows from the smells of the world, but you know, watching her, that you know almost nothing,” the great poet Mary Oliver writes in her 2013 book Dog Songs. Anyone who has ever seen a dog at the beach knows this to be true. Whether they’re chasing a ball or digging holes in the shade, dogs love the beach in some indelible, instinctual way that us humans can never truly grasp.

It’s tragic that so many beautiful beaches are closed to dogs during peak summer months, but this story is not about those beaches. It’s about those that welcome canines large and small. In honor of the season, we culled the Offset collection in search of the most joyous, life-affirming pictures of dogs on the beach.

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