Posts tagged: animal photography

Compassionate Portraits Capture the Dignity and Grace of Farm Animals




As the global farming industry expands, mankind, suggests New Zealand-based photographer Cally Whitham, has in many ways failed to recognize the inherent dignity and grace that lies within the breasts of farm animals. With Epitaph, she pictures barnyard inhabitants—from pigs to sheep, cows to turkeys—in tender and fanciful portraits, resurrecting the oft-forgotten pathos that ties us to our fellow creatures.

An Underground World in Bucharest, Romania Where Homeless Individuals are Barely Surviving




Bruce Lee lives on the streets, says Bucharest-based photographer Dani Gherca, hopping from one place to the next in search of shelter and caring for a close-knit group of homeless individuals who have claimed him as their surrogate father. For Bruce Lee, who was born Florin Hora, sustaining the welfare of those in need— people and stray dogs who like him have been abandoned cast out of the comforts mainstream society— is a responsibility given to him by God.

Dark and Disturbing Photos Illustrate Stories of ‘Feral Children’


Oxana Malaya, Ukraine, 1991: Oxana was found living with dogs in a kennel in 1991. She was eight years old and had lived with the dogs for six years. Her parents were alcoholics and one night, they had left her outside. Looking for warmth, the three year old crawled into the farm kennel and curled up with the mongrel dogs, an act that probably saved her life. When discovered she behaved more like a dog than a human child. She ran on all fours, panted with her tongue out, bared her teeth and barked. Because of her lack of human interaction, she only knew the words “yes” and “no.”

Intensive therapy aided Oxana to learn basic social and verbal skills, but only with the ability of a five year old. Now 30 years old, she now lives in a clinic in Odessa and works with the hospital’s farm animals under the supervision of her carers.


Lobo Wolf Girl, Mexico, 1845/1852: In 1845 a girl was seen running on all fours with a pack of wolves attacking a herd of goats. A year later she was seen with the wolves eating a goat. She was captured but escaped. In 1852, she was seen yet again suckling two wolf cubs, but she ran into the woods. She was never seen again.

For London-based photographer Julia Fullerton-Batten, tales of children abused or deserted by their parents and raised by wild creatures are no longer confined to folklore and storybooks but to tangible records of human history. For Feral Children, the photographer scoured the history books, culling stories of childhoods spent alone, of children who one way or another came into the care of wild beasts. Here, she recounts in pictures the early years of fifteen of young people who indeed were reared by or with animals without the comforts of human contact, lifting them from the pages of textbooks and into a true and pulsating universe all their own.

A Glimpse Into the Lives of Children Homeschooled in Upstate New York


Hula Hoop, 2012


Morgan as Thor, 2011

Berlin-based photographer Rachel Papo’s latest project focuses on the everyday lives of homeschooled children in the Catskills of Upstate New York. As homeschooling rises in popularity, Papo’s series seeks to document this emerging counterculture and to explore objectively what it means to grow up beyond the classroom walls. Being a mother herself and new to the idea of homeschooling, Papo was compelled to probe the subject deeper.

Homeless Pit Bulls Get a Chance to Shine in Floral Photo Series


Murdock, available for adoption at Last Hope Animal Rescue


Aphrodite, available for adoption at Sean Casey Animal Rescue


Apple, adopted

Murdock, says New York-based photographer Sophie Gamand, who has been making portraits of pit bull type dogs over the last year, is “the sweetest dog.” Like many pit bulls who ultimately wind up homeless and in shelters, Murdock was abused at a dog fighting ring, where he was used as a “bait dog” to test the fighting strength of other dogs. His mouth was likely taped shut so that he was unable to defend himself, and he survived the ordeal with one blind eye and numerous wounds. Despite the cruelty of his past, Murdock was and continues to be deeply loved by the shelter staffers who care for him. Pit bulls like Murdock are what drives Gamand to continue to fight against the stigma that often surrounds them with her series Pit Bull Flower Power, for which she has photographed over one hundred dogs cloaked in handmade crowns of blossoms.

3 Photographers on What It’s Like to Work (and Sell Images) with ImageBrief (Sponsored)


Emily Wilson

“I like working with people who genuinely want me to succeed,” says portrait photographer Emily Wilson—who has worked with such clients as The New York Times, Grey Advertising, and The Globe and Mail—of her decision to join ImageBrief, a platform that directly connects brands, advertising agencies, and other buyers who are looking for specific content with photographers who are perfect for the job. Like so many others on ImageBrief, she’s found the support she needs to further build her already impressive network of top clients, including Reebok, whose executives hired her on assignment after seeing some images she’d uploaded to her profile.

Hard-Hitting Images Examine the Complex Relationship Between Asians and Elephants

Vanishing Giants11

A tear rolls the cheek of a distressed elephant as his spirit is broken after three days of imprisonment in a wooded crush on the Thai- Burma border

Hand of a Mahout as he leeds this your elephant in Western Thailand

Hand of a Mahout as he leeds an elephant in Western Thailand

“In Asia, we haven’t quite figured out whether we love these animals or hate them,” says Madras-born, Hong Kong-based photographer Palani Mohan of the elephants he spent over five years documenting. Vanishing Giants is his testimony of the ways in which mankind both cherishes and does violence to the Asian elephants that live amongst humans in villages and cities alike.

Touching Portraits of Dogs Taken Years Apart, from Puppyhood to Old Age


Lily, 8 months


Lily, 15 years

Although Massachusetts-based portrait photographer Amanda Jones has been working with dogs for two decades, the first canine she could call her own was a longhaired Dachshund named Lily. As Jones’s first-born, Lily was there for it all— various relocations, the arrival of the photographer’s human baby— until she passed away after sixteen years of friendship. Lily, says the photographer, was the companion who ultimately led her to create Dog Years, a book for which she captured dogs in mirrored photographs of their youth and old age, taken years apart.

Portraits Capture the Humanity of Primates



As the single male gorilla amongst five females housed together at the Berlin Zoo, Ivo the silverback familiar to many throughout Europe for his rare and curious response to the throngs of visitors that pass by his run. The twenty-something-year-old animal has yet to find a mate and spends much of his days colliding with and hammering upon the glass that separates him from spectators. Sometimes, he’ll simply gather toss rocks at the crowd until they disperse in fear. Meeting Ivo, says Warsaw-based photographer Pawel Bogumil, marked the beginning of what would become inHUMAN, a series that has lead him to conclude that although they may not be human, apes are— in the most essential sense— people.

Intense Portraits Show Reptiles and Insects Interacting with the Human Body




For Penumbrae, Dutch photographer Juul Kraijer collaborates with her longtime muse, a young French woman who chooses to remain unnamed, to build human-animal hybrids that incorporate a bestiary of terrestrial and avian creatures.