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Celebrate the Legacy of Irving Penn with “Centennial”

Irving Penn, American, Plainfield, New Jersey, 1917–2009, New York.
Pablo Picasso at La Californie, Cannes
1957, printed February 1985 Platinum-palladium print
Image: 18 5/8 x 18 5/8 in. (47.3 x 47.3 cm.) Sheet: 24 15/16 x 22 in. (63.3 x 55.9 cm.) Mount: 26 x 22 in. (66 x 55.9 cm.) Overall: 26 x 22 in. (66 x 55.9 cm.)
Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation IP .123

Irving Penn, American, Plainfield, New Jersey, 1917–2009, New York.
Three Asaro Mud Men, New Guinea
1970, printed 1976 Platinum-palladium print
Image: 20 1/8 x 19 1/2 in. (51.1 x 49.6    cm.) Sheet: 24 15/16 x 22 1/16 in. (63.3 x 56 cm.) Mount: 26 1/16 x 22 1/16 in. (66.2 x 56 cm.) Overall: 26 1/16 x 22 1/16 in. (66.2 x 56 cm.)
Promised Gift of The Irving Penn Foundation IP .154

“Photography is just the present stage of man’s visual history,” Irving Penn (1917-2009) sagely observed, recognizing the infinite possibilities of the human animal to create technology that would advance our ability to document, represent, and re-envision the world. As a master of the form, Penn understood that the only thing that limits us is imagination.

For seven decades he worked, becoming a master of studio photography with the ability to craft pictures of anything he wished. Here was a man who could transform his very first commission for Jell-o pudding into a resounding success, even though, as Penn realized, it was, “a abstract nothing, it’s just a blob of ectoplasm.”

Yet with that formless glob of goop crafted in a laboratory, Penn was able to entice consumers to buy and serve the product en masse. It’s precisely this ability to transcend the particulars that made Penn a master of whatever form he chose to shoot, be in portraits, fashion, still life, food, nudes, or flowers. He understood that the photograph was an invitation to engage, to gaze upon the world without actually having to interact with it.

Eerie, Fantastical Photos of Wildlife and People

Calgary photographer Philip Kanwischer’s wild subjects never stick around for long. The deer, the moose, the owls, the bears, and all the inhabitants of a feral landscape are ephemeral; they appear one moment and vanish the next. Only in photographs can he stay close to them.

A suicide prevention app made by and for Aboriginal people

Three Aboriginal people take their lives every week in Australia. According to the Australian Youth Development Index  (YDI), the suicide rate for young indigenous men is the highest in the world—a frightening statistic that indigenous people want to confront.

“One might point to alcohol, poverty and illness as influencing factors” says photographer and cultural historian Judith Crispin, who has worked extensively with the Warlpiri people, “but I share the prevailing view of indigenous elders that the primary reason for suicides in our Aboriginal population is that people have been cut off from their culture. Without culture, the connection to country is difficult to find—and without connection to a country a person becomes lost”.

Take a Peek at the Larry Sultan Retrospective at SFMOMA

Larry Sultan, Business Page, from the series Pictures From Home, 1985; chromogenic print.

Larry Sultan, Practicing Golf Swing, from the series Pictures from Home, 1986; chromogenic print.

Larry Sultan, My Mother Posing for Me, from the series Pictures From Home, 1984; chromogenic print.

Home is a state of mind as much as it is a place. For some it can be a four-letter word of the very worst kind—or it can be synonymous with love. Home can be so many things, all of them deeply personal.

For photographer Larry Sultan (1946-2009), home was where he created work, lush images of suburban California that are as American as Hostess cupcakes. There’s something delightfully unnatural about it all, something that comforts us with soothing visions of a naïve faith in the possibilities of the contrived. Here, the element of control reveals itself, that deeply seductive belief that we run this.

Discover the People Behind the “Strictly Platonic” Ads on Craigslist

Vegan bestie – w4w
body: fit
height: 5’6″ (167cm)
status: single
age: 26
Looking for an intelligent, vegan, self starting woman who wants to explore vegan food together.

Naked cleaning by man – m4w
body : athletic
age: 36

Man for hire: cleaning house or apartment without clothes. Man: white, 5’8″, 165 lbs, athletic

In a city of 8.5 million, for some New York can feel like the loneliest place on earth. The irony of the crowd is the way it depersonalizes life; when everyone is a stranger, it can exacerbate antisocial tendencies. Add to the increasing dependency on digital communications, where three dimensions are reduced to two and people cease to act in real time and space, creating representations that they use to seek attention, albeit positive or negative.

For those with particular hobbies and tastes, or simply more inclined to introversion and risk adverse, making friends can be a challenge all its own. Craigslist understands this and offers “Strictly Platonic” personals. Here, people can say exactly what they want outside the context of a sexual or romantic exchange (although this is something of a grey areas, as many ads blur these lines).

Photos Offer an Unflinching Look at Modern Russia

“We tolerate today for the sake of a good tomorrow,” Russian photographer Alexander Anufriev said when I asked him about the country he calls home, “but tomorrow never comes.”

Recreating London’s Iconic Reggae Record Covers, in Photos

Dandy Livingstone, Your Musical Doctor (Downtown, 1969), 46 years later

Various, Harder Shade of Black (Santic, 1974), 42 years later.

London photographer Alex Bartsch doesn’t know how many vinyl records are in his collection, but he has tracked down the exact spots where 42 of their covers were shot. He has biked all over the city, album covers in hand, stepping back in time and reconstructing a visual history of reggae from 1967 and 1987. Covers, now available for pre-order, is the result of his adventures.

Viviane Sassen’s New Photobook is Joyful and Tender (NSFW)

This summer will see the release of Roxane II, Viviane Sassen’s newest book, published by oodee. Following Roxane, her 2012 exploration of her relationship with her titular muse over several years, the new work continues to broaden Sassen’s poetic experimentation with colour and form, with her use of other media rising ever more prominently to the surface.

Petra Collins’s Intimate Photos of Friends and Family

“Anna and Anya (Hungary)” (2016)

“Anna and Kathleen (Rainbow)” (2016)

The meteoric rise of Toronto-born Petra Collins skyrocketed her from suburban teenager to international fashion photographer, artist, and feminist provocateur. Growing up in the suburbs of Toronto in the 2000s, Collins discovered photography at age 15, was introduced to VICE magazine while working at American Apparel, and sought mentorship by Richard Kern and Ryan McGinley. At 17, she founded The Ardorous, a female art collective providing a platform for emerging female artists. Now 24, Collins regularly shoots for high-end clients like Gucci Eyewear, Nordstrom, Stella McCartney, Calvin Klein, Levi, to name only a few, and has shot editorial for magazines such as Vogue, Purple Magazine, I-D Magazine, and Dazed and Confused. A prolific Instagrammer, Collins invites her over half-million followers on a seemingly personal journey. Her loose and natural photographic style grants viewers a voyeuristic look into a private world of youth, vulnerability, and explorations of female sexuality.

‘Ali the Greatest’ Photographed by Harry Benson, Thomas Hoepker, William Klein and Steve Schapiro

USA, Chicago, 1966. MUHAMMAD ALI, (formerly Cassius Clay), boxing world heavy weight champion in Chicago, Muhammad Ali on a bridge over the Chicago river. “The man with no imagination has no wings.” © Thomas Hoepker and Magnum Photos, ‘Muhammad Ali Jumping, Chicago’, 1966, Courtesy Atlas Gallery.

© Thomas Hoepker and Magnum Photos, ‘Ali Fist Sequence, Chicago’, 1966, Courtesy Atlas Gallery.

April 29, 2017, marked the 50th anniversary of the day Muhammad Ali was stripped of his World Heavyweight title and had his boxing license suspended for refusing to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces in order to fight in the war in Vietnam.

Ali issued a statement saying: “It is in the light of my consciousness as a Muslim minister and my own personal convictions that I take my stand in rejecting the call to be inducted. I do so with the full realization of its implications. I have searched my conscience. I had the world heavyweight title not because it was given to me, not because of my race or religion, but because I won it in the ring. Those who want to take it and start a series of auction-type bouts not only do me a disservice, but actually disgrace themselves… Sports fans and fair-minded people throughout America would never accept such a title-holder.” 

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