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One Photographer’s Collaboration with a 175-Year-Old Ghost

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Hauntingly

In 2002, New York photographer Stacy Renee Morrison found an old trunk discarded in the city streets and filled with photographs, jewelry, perfume, and other delicate keepsakes dating back to the 19th century. They were, discovered the photographer, the possessions of a woman named Sylvia DeWolf Ostrander, who died in 1925 at the age of eighty-four.

Intimate Portraits of Couples Prove that Love Has No Boundaries

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For Hungarian photographer Wanda Martin, the nature of sexual fluidity and the similarities between heterosexual and homosexual relationships have become a fascination, spurred on by her own personal experiences. With time, her photographs of lovers evolved into a celebration of love par excellence, and a means of visually communicating that love does not depend on the sex or gender of the person, but only on the persons involved. Lovers offers an intensely intimate glimpse into the private moments of couples who belong to contemporary youth culture.

Under Black Lights, Models Star in Psychedelic Photos

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As soon as he stepped into the cosmic cave of Magnus Sodamin’s art installation ‘Infinity Split’, Miami-based photographer Alex Markow knew right away that he wanted to collaborate with the artist. In his new series titled Lost in Infinity Split, neon splattered models float nude in a kind of psychedelic acid trip, lost in-between scintillas of cosmic light. The bodies, part illuminated in jeweled colors and half swallowed by darkness, appear like visions out of the galactic space, seducing us into the mysteries of the night.

91-Year-Old Woman Embraces Life in Profound and Playful Images

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In 2014, Canadian Italian artist Tony Luciani’s mother, then ninety-one years old, was no longer able to look after herself. As a painter working from his home studio, he felt it was best she stayed with him. “Mom doesn’t cook or clean anymore, so I’m the full-time caregiver” explains Tony, who began to include his mother in his art in order to help her feel more “productive”. With time, her role in the mother and son collaboration was a rejuvenating experience, “I noticed how alive she felt by participating; her youthfulness and eccentricity started to show through”. 

The Most Incredible Underwater Photos Taken off An Island in The Philippines (Sponsored)

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© Karl Lundholm / Offset

Beneath the surface

© Karl Lundholm / Offset

It all started with a Google search: “the best surf in The Philippines.” Having just come off the high of shooting waves in Australia, Swedish photographer and Offset artist Karl Lundholm wanted to make one last stop on his way home. One place kept coming up in his search, and the more he learned, the more he yearned to visit the island of Siargao.

Step into the Bold Graphic of London’s streets

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OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

In Rupert Vandervell’s Geometrix, the city of London is fiercely rendered in black and white. Investigating “the juxtaposition between the urban background and the human form,” the series uses the city as a series of graphic shapes against which to cast solitary figures passing through that draw the eye of the viewer in towards them.

Tragedy and Poetry in the World of Paris’s ‘Crisis Generation’ (NSFW)

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Dans la chambre de Maxime, 2014

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Dexter en cendres, 2010

“We want to be a lost cause,” explains French photographer Hannibal Volkoff of the generation pictured in his first book Nous naissons de partout, which translates roughly in English to mean We are born all over. Beginning in the late aughts, the artist—himself a young man— has chronicled the ecstatic adventures of adolescents and emerging adults as they toss aside the conventions, rules, and securities of their parents’ generation.

Intimacy and Youth Captured Beautifully in the Blue Ridge Mountains

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Alec Castillo began making photographs here – nestled in the Blue Ridge Mountains of western North Carolina, the peaks often appearing in his grainy, black and white photographs. This was a time that Castillo termed as a ‘weird transitional phase’ of making new friends and rummaging about for an identity that fit. This is when he looked through the viewfinder to reflect, and inherently construct an identity. He introduces us to individuals – new friends among old ones – in a manner that moves beyond portraiture, traversing personal identity in the larger context of social groups.

Capturing the Dignity of Bangladesh’s Most Oppressed People

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Dhaka-based photographer Samsul Alam Helal remembers vividly his first encounters with the Dalit community. The men, women, and children were ignored by passersby, turned away by local tea stalls. Seeing the extent to which these individuals were affected by caste-based discrimination, the photographer says, “I remember feeling shame.” That initial pang is what led him to enter the private world of Bangladesh’s Dalits, a name that translates in English to mean “the oppressed.”

A Rare Glimpse Inside Cuba’s Tenement Houses

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New York-based Italian photographer Carolina Sandretto first travelled to Cuba in 2011; the country fascinated Carolina, as did the “time bubble which entraps it” and the strangely familiar culture she encountered there. The photographer started shooting Vivir Con in 2013, a project which stemmed from a personal exigency to describe what it means to live in Cuba, both in cultural and geographical terms. Due to a lack of means and permits to build new homes, the majority of the Cuban population live in “solars”: a solar is a building that was originally designed to be lived in by only one family, but has been transformed into a multi-family “coop” due to the increase in population and lack of space. Carolina elaborates: “One family often resides in one small room where all family members eat and sleep, from the grandparents to the nephews”. Vivir Con gives us a glimpse into what family life is like in a small space in a tropical country, while examining the tensions between neighboring families who are forced to co-exist.

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