Menu

Photography Website Makeover: The Human Condition

The_Human_Condition_Homepage

The Human Condition’s Squarespace Website

Argentinian photographer Rodrigo Llauro and Australian filmmaker and writer Natalia Cartney created The Human Condition as a platform for exploring and documenting diverse communities ranging from the vintage automobile subculture of Biloxi, Mississippi to the indigenous tribes of Peru. As our world becomes increasingly global, The Human Condition shines light not only on the value of our differences but also on the essential core that ties together all of humanity.

Whether they are celebrating the beauty of the Indian Holi festival or opening an ethical and moral dialogue about cockfighting in the Peruvian Amazon, Llauro and Cartney display an unfaltering cultural sensitivity. They used Squarespace to build a website that showcases their without distracting from the potency of their message. Creating their own site allowed them to focus on what really matters: giving voice to peoples throughout the world. Without having to worry about complex coding, Llauro and Cartney are ready to carve out the time for their travels. We spoke to Llauro about the new site.

Portraits of Shelter Dogs Resembling Your Favorite Authors and Poets

Dan_Bannino_01

Charles Bukowski

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

Charles Pierre Baudelaire

Charles Pierre Baudelaire

When Italian photographer Dan Bannino adopted his dog Rothko from a shelter last March, he was overcome by tears, both for himself and for his new best friend. Rothko’s unconditional love serves as the motivation for Poetic Dogs, in which Bannino couples homeless shelter dogs with his favorite authors and poets. In the adoptable animals, the artist discovers the empathy of Shakespeare, the wit of Joyce, the fortitude of Hemingway, and the soulfulness of Dickinson.

A Behind-the-Scenes Look at an Amazon Warehouse During the Holiday Season

Stephen_Wilkes_06

On 500,000 square feet in Tracy, California stands one of the ten Amazon warehouses that operate during peek holiday season with the help of 15,000 compact, 320 pound robots, machines that are designed to pull items from storage and deliver them to a worker for processing and packaging. In a recent short film shot for TIME, videographer and photographer Stephen Wilkes unveils the intricacies of the futuristic process by chronicling the journey of a single teddy bear from arrival to storage to shipment.

Photographer Uses Human Flesh as an Artistic Medium

Juuke_Schoorl_03

Juuke_Schoorl_04

Juuke_Schoorl_01

For Rek, Netherlands-based photographer Juuke Schoorl tests the limits of human skin, stretching and manipulating the flesh of her subjects with inexpensive items like thread, cellulose tape, and other household materials.

Electric Photos of Nude Dancers Suspended in Air

Alyssa_Katherine_Faoro_152034

© Alyssa Katherine Faoro / Offset

Alyssa_Katherine_Faoro_152029

© Alyssa Katherine Faoro / Offset

For her vibrant series of nude portraits, Windsor, Canada-based photographer Alyssa Katherine Faoro sets dancers against luminous colored backdrops, imbuing the human body with a sense of mystery, grace, and spontaneity.

Photographer Phillip Stearns Shocks Film in ‘High Voltage Image Making’

Phillip_Stearns_01

Phillip_Stearns_08

 

For High Voltage Image Making, Brooklyn-based artist Phillip Stearns fundamentally alters the structure of color film by administering as many as 15,000 electrical volts to its surface, producing a resultant print set ablaze with woven Lichtenberg figures.

Fictitious Expiration Dates and the Pressure to Produce Art

Archive Image courtesy of Drs Kulturarvsprojekt/Wikimedia

Artworks must have been completed within the last two years. This sentence arises amidst other requirements for exhibition proposals, juried competitions, publications, and other venues for showing ones art. It seems harmless enough, maybe even helpful, encouraging artists to continue producing work during their busy lives. And yet I have recently begun to view this requirement as one piece in a larger problem: an expiration date on art. While generating new work is unquestionably important, the implication is that older work, work that is over two years old, has expired and is no longer of interest to these particular venues. In an effort to stay relevant, artists are pressured to release new work on a swifter timetable.

LA’s Provocative American Apparel Billboards Found in Unusual Places

Thomas_Alleman_03

Thomas_Alleman_15

Sex sells, and no company knows this better than American Apparel, the controversial North American clothing manufacturer and retailer best known for shocking ad campaigns featuring famous porn stars, visible pubic hair, and half-naked young women contorted into graphic, suggestive positions most often associated with girlie mags. The company has launched countless blog posts, been labeled as feminist, sexist, revolutionary, racist, and everything in between. For Los Angeles-based photographer Thomas Alleman, American Apparel’s pervasive presence in his hometown has gone a step further, helping to shape his perception of the city, its culture, and the larger currents of consumerism.

Feature Shoot Recommends: Top 10 Photo Events and Happenings in New York (Dec 8 – 14)

VeeSpeers

Untitled #32, 2013 © Vee Speers/Courtesy Kasher|Potamkin

EXHIBITION: Gilded Forest, Kasher|Potamkin, 515 West 26th Street, 2nd Floor November 7 – December 20
The holiday exhibition at Kasher|Potamkin features a variety of media and art objects. Photographs by Vee SpeersLuke Stephenson, Shae DeTar, and Marianna Rothen are on view among the fascinatingly curated collection of unique works.

A Print Sale Benefiting NYC Salt

Merelyn_Bucio

Young Love, $75 © Merelyn Bucio

Last year, we profiled the non-profit NYC Salt for their amazing program that teaches inner city high school students photography and prepares them for college. 100% of Salt graduates have been accepted into college – and most all are the first generation of their family to attend. We continue to be inspired not only by the non-profit, but also by the work these kids are creating and their visual take on NYC. This year, we’ve teamed up with NYC Salt and CoEdit Collection to launch a special collection of images taken by NYC Salt students. The work is reasonably priced and 100% of the funds raised go back into the program.