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Posts by: Sophie Butcher

Photos of Rural Children Around the World Dressed Up as Their Dream Professions

Sofie KnijffJournalist, Mali

Belgian-born photographer Sofie Knijff has spent the last three years traveling the world making portraits of children and asking them one question: what do you want to be when you grow up? With limitless imagination the children answer, dressing up as their future selves in a series she calls Translations. By using similar backdrops for each child, Knijff strips them of their current surroundings in order to focus more intimately on their “dream characters.”

Marc Fichou’s Origami Photos

Marc_Fichou_Photography

The sheet of paper contains both the photographic and the material memories of its past origami form. Origami and paper are one and the same thing at two different times, in two different spaces and in two different shapes.
Marc Fichou

French born, Los Angeles-based artist Marc Fichou is interested in experimenting with different materials. In his series Paper on Paper, he explores paper as at once image and matter. Fichou crafts origami pieces and photographs them, and then cleverly uses the print as an unfolded version referencing the object’s initial starting point, “creating a visual link between past and present.” His photographic transfers on wood explore this same process and they are currently on view at the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery as part of their bienniel exhibition through September 22, 2013.

Marc_Fichou_Photography

Poliexeni Papapetrou’s Portraits of Strange Masked Characters

Polixeni_Papapetrou_Photography

Poliexeni Papapetrou is a Melbourne-based photographer. Her series, The Dreamkeepers, is eerie and haunting, contrasting brightly lit, beautiful landscapes with unnerving solitary moments – old men wandering in empty landscapes or a young woman holding onto her camera while lost in thought. Her subjects are always detached and invariably alone, wearing masks to further raise the question: are these humans after all or perhaps just symbols of ourselves?

Portraits of Beautiful, Topless and Highly Controversial Femen Activists (NSFW)


Sacha Shevchenko, 23 years old. Photo: Guillaume Herbaut/INSTITUTE

Guillaume Herbaut’s series, The New Amazons, brought him to the Brejnev district in Kiev, Ukraine, where he took portraits of the controversial feminist group Femen. Femen activists strive to fight sexual tourism and to educate women to be more assertive and powerful. They use their bodies as weapons and protest nude, or topless, in the streets in order to achieve their goals.

Dynamic Photos of Exploding Idyllic Landscapes

Ueli_Alder_Photography

Swiss artist, Ueli Alder, has created a series, Detonations, in which he collages imagery found on the Internet, specifically explosions found in war themed video games with photographs of idyllic landscapes. He toys with our senses juxtaposing fiction and reality and is interested in the reaction this creates.

Haunting Landscapes Explore Themes of Nostalgia and Mythology

Jeremy Dyer

For me, these images are an atavistic response to the landscape, one that engages the land as a site for malignant or indifferent natural forces. Even so, these photographs touch on the landscape as a nostalgic articulation of our histories, a history made impossible by memory and mythology.—Jeremy Dyer

In Brooklyn-based photographer Jeremy Dyer‘s series Haemal, he makes collages from portions of his photographs, found snapshots and family photos in order to construct fictional spaces that explore themes such as memory, history, culture and myth in the landscape-as-image.

Jeremy Dyer

Photographer Portrays Idyllic Mother-Daughter Relationship in ‘I Promise to Be a Good Mother’

Jamie_Diamond_Photography

New York based photographer, Jamie Diamond continues to explore the complicated relationship between performance and photography. In I Promise to be a Good Mother she photographs herself as she performs the role of a mother, wearing her own mother’s clothes, posing with Annabelle, a re-born doll.

Surprising Photos Reveal the Candy-Colored Insides of Golf Balls

James_Friedman_Photography

“What I found inside inspired me to consider that I could discover, in the unlikeliest of places, elegant formal qualities and surprising metaphorical possibilities. Interior Design has moved me to be enthusiastic about abstraction, an exciting corollary to my work as a documentary photographer” — James Friedman

Ironically, Ohio-based photographer James Friedman does not play golf. However, curiosity led him to cut up golf balls in half to see what the core looks like. To his great surprise, he discovered what lay beneath the glossy white surfaces were beautiful and intricate shapes and colors.

James_Friedman_Photography

Photos Look at the Lives of Sea Nomads Living off the Coast of Burma and Thailand

Sofie_Olsen_Photography

Their relationship with the ocean is extraordinary, traditionally living up to nine months of the year on boats, learning to swim before they can walk, and perceiving the ocean as their natural habitat. Living as hunters and gatherers, they are living without materialistic desires, and have long been protected from influence from the mainland. The modern world is entering theirs, and slowly they are losing their religion to ours.—Sofie Olsen

Oslo-based photographer Sofie Olsen has been working in cooperation with an initiative called Project Moken, a multimedia platform in the works of making a documentary film about the lives of indigenous sea nomads living off the coastline of Burma and Thailand. Often inspired to photograph communities that exist on the fringe of society, Olsen found the Moken people and “their 3500-year-old culture as being one with the ocean” especially interesting. She learned to scuba dive so she could follow the men underwater as they hunted, capturing beautiful, quiet and intimate photographs. Olsen says of the several diving expeditions she has been on, “The feeling of weightlessness must be the closest I will ever get to fly, floating in an element where I am an alien makes me totally vulnerable and humble to the grandness of nature.”