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Posts by: Ellyn Kail

A Deeply Human Look at the Lives of Transgender Youth

“All my friends say ‘Oh, I started my period.’ or ‘I’m a B cup now.’ It’s hard for them to understand that that doesn’t happen to us and that we can’t give birth. Not that we necessarily want to, but we do want to feel the same.” – Lilly, 12-year-old transgender female, North Central California

“I know very well that I’m male, and yet I’m treated like a young child, as though I don’t know my own mind, when I’ve never been so sure of anything. I think it’s unfair to expect transgender children to live in the wrong body. My whole life is blighted by it. It never leaves. I’m always confronted by it because I have to live in a body that is not mine. ” – Zak, 13-year-old transgender male, Isle of Wight, England

Photographer Annie Tritt embarked on Transcending Self, a collection of portraits and interviews with transgender and gender expansive children, teenagers, and young adults around the world, more than two years ago. She spent the first year learning and absorbing information. She’d seen the inaccuracies and potentially hurtful stories the press had made in handling the subject in the past, and she wanted instead to give voice directly to the transgender youth.

“This is not my story,” she says, “It is theirs.”

The True and Untold Stories of The Black Panthers

B Kwaku Duren © Bryan Shih, from the book ‘The Black Panthers: Portraits From an Unfinished Revolution’

Charlotte O’Neal © Bryan Shih, from the book ‘The Black Panthers: Portraits From an Unfinished Revolution’

In 1981, one year before the dissolution of the Black Panther Party, co-founder Bobby Seale told a full college auditorium, “Today we don’t need guns; we need computers.” On the 50th anniversary of the party’s founding, photojournalist Bryan Shih sees that prediction coming to life in the Black Lives Matter movement: once more, young people are making their voices heard, against a backdrop of our country’s police brutality, mass incarceration, and systemic racism.

Shih spent four-plus years getting to know former Black Panthers and recording their stories. He teamed up with historian Yohuru R. Williams to make The Black Panthers: Portraits From an Unfinished Revolution, a book composed of photographs, archival materials, scholarly essays, and perhaps most importantly, testimony from the individuals themselves.

Tales From a Street Photographer in St. Petersburg

When I asked Alexander Petrosyan to tell me why St. Petersburg is a great place for street photography, he answered honestly. It isn’t. It’s usually freezing, and the streets are never well-lit. The streets are mostly empty because everyone is always in a hurry to get someplace. He takes pictures here not because it’s easy but because it’s been his home for more than four decades.

Minimalist Snapshots of the World by ‘the Agoraphobic Traveller’

Impressive cactus, Sun City, Arizona.

Football game, Chile.

“At first I was uncomfortable with sharing my mental health issues publicly,” photographer Jacqui Kenny, sometimes known as the “Agoraphobic Traveller,” says, “Now it’s something I talk openly about.”

Fashion and Architecture Collide in the Work of ‘Modelographer’ Josef Adamu (Sponsored)

From Josef Adamu’s Squarespace website

It’s impossible to put Josef Adamu inside a box. He’s a creative director, but he’s never content staying behind the lens. Most of the time, he’s in front of it, directing the photographer and starring in the shoot at the same time.

20 Years of Protest in NYC, in Photos

Brooklyn, 1991. A woman walks by a line of police during the Crown Heights race riots in Brooklyn. This was a three-day racial riot that occurred from August 19th to 21st and pitted African American and Caribbean Americans against Jewish residents. © Mark Peterson

Pro-choice demonstrators in downtown Manhattan protest the July 3rd, 1989 Supreme Court Webster decision which limited Roe V Wade. This was a turning point in the pro-choice movement. 24 were arrested, including activist Mary Lou Greenberg, as they stormed the Brooklyn Bridge. © Nina Berman / NOOR

When photo editor Meg Handler and historian Tamar Carroll first started talks in 2014 about what would later become the exhibition Whose Streets? Our Streets! at the Bronx Documentary Center, Donald Trump had not yet announced his bid for President of the United States. Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Freddie Gray, and Alton Sterling were all still alive. The Black Lives Matter movement was in its infancy.

Haunting Visions of the Sprawling American West

French photographer Emmanuel Monzon thinks living in the United States is like living inside a painting. In his meticulously crafted American scenes, all humans have vacated the premises, leaving behind only the background they once inhabited.

Visions of Iceland from a Remote Sheep Farm

In her remote corner of Iceland, photographer Marzena Skubatz makes her home in a sheep farm and weather station.

A French Photographer Finds Magic in the Streets of China

French photographer Marilyn Mugot longs for dépaysement. The word doesn’t have a direct English translation; some dictionaries define it as “disorientation” or “a change in scenery,” but the artist describes it simply as “this feeling of being far away from home.” And she found it in China.

The Woman Who Wanted to Photograph Every House in Poland

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

Zofia Rydet mentioned in one of her letters that taking photos for her is like vodka to an alcoholic,” curator Sebastian Cichocki says of the 20th century photographer, “It’s like an addiction, so she collects more and more and more and she’s never satisfied.”

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