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Posts tagged: portrait photography

A Photographer and Her Muse Re-Stage History’s Iconic Photos

A tribute to Diane Arbus, A Young Man in Curlers at Home on West 20th Street, N.Y.C., 1966

In the beginning, Looking for Masters in Ricardo’s Golden Shoes was just a game played by a pair of old friends, the French artist Catherine Balet and the costume designer Ricardo Martinez-Paz, when they decided to replicate a famous portrait of Pablo Picasso by Robert Doisneau. It was a private little theatrical moment, with Martinez-Paz playing the role of Picasso and Balet casting herself as Doisneau.

Quickly, however, Balet says it became a kind of obsession. The two of them have since painstakingly reproduced some of the most recognizable images in photographic history, with the costume designer embodying the essence of the various subjects, spanning ages, genders, and backgrounds— from Avedon’s “beekeeper” to Capa’s “falling soldier.”

Changing the Way the World Sees Africa, in Photos

HUSSEIN (2017)

Montreal-based photographer Yannis Davy Guibinga, who was born and raised in Gabon, recently asked an auditorium of people at the University of Toronto, “Can you believe that in 2017, some people still think Africa’s a country?” Everyone laughed. He smiled, “It’s funny, but it’s true.” Then he looked at the audience seriously. The tone shifted.

At twenty-two, Guibinga is part of a growing movement of young artists reshaping the way the world understands Africa and its diaspora. His voice rises above the din of centuries of misinformation, prejudice, and revised history to tell personal and universal stories about what it means to be part of the continent.

65 Photos from The Print Swap Are Coming to Photoville!

‘A Broken Pulsar’ © Fili Olsefski, Athens, Greece

‘Down by the Station’ © Steffen Tuck, Brisbane, Australia

‘Havana by Night’ © Eric Hsu, New York, NY

Last year, Feature Shoot launched The Print Swap, a way to connect photographers around the world. The rules are simple: anyone can submit by using the hashtag #theprintswap on Instagram. If your image is selected, it’s printed by the experts at Skink Ink in Brooklyn before being mailed across the world and landing on the doorstep of another winner. Every winning photographer gives a print, and every winning photographer receives a print too. Pieces are mailed out randomly, so it’s always a fun surprise to see who ends up with which print.

Since its inception, The Print Swap has received more than 45,000 submissions. Curators Alison Zavos and Julia Sabot have selected more than 2,500 winning images. Over the past two months, they’ve also considered all incoming submissions and handpicked 65 of them to show at the first ever Print Swap exhibition, opening in September at Photoville at Brooklyn Bridge Park. Photoville, the largest annual photography event in New York City and, will include 70+ exhibitions this year, all installed in repurposed shipping containers-turned-galleries.

This is truly an international exhibition. Zavos and Sabot chose pictures from photographers working in twenty countries around the world. But more than that, this collection represents a wide range of practices, genres, and methods. There’s film; there’s digital. There’s classic black and white and vibrant, artificial color.

These photographers find reverence, dignity, and whimsy in humans and animals alike. Jake Green photographs Sonja Usher, an actor playing the role of the Archbishop of Canterbury in a production of Shakespeare’s Henry V. Kristen Bartley introduces us to Picasso, a dog whose name presumably comes from the slightly off-kilter structure of his face. Even uninhabited places, like Steffen Tuck’s Australian subway station or Bonita Chan’s reflected Hong Kong carousel, seem to thrum with life.

For all the beauty, there are also echoes of urgency and loss that color and illuminate corners of this exhibition. Aleksandra Dynas meets children living in the streets of Uganda, where over ten thousand young people go without food, shelter, education and medical care. Many work in demolition and do jobs on trucks, and the littlest ones collect metal and plastic. Yusni Aziz encounters a young resident of the Kampung Akuarium in Jakarta sitting in his “dream house,” a thoughtfully designed and decorated fisherman’s boat, after families in the area were evicted and their homes were razed to the ground.

Here, you’ll find all the participating photographers showing work at The Print Swap exhibition at Photoville. We hope you’ll visit in person between September 13-24, 2017. After all, these prints were meant to be seen in real life, hanging on a wall. As always, The Print Swap is open for submissions. Find more details on our website, and check in at @theprintswap on Instagram, where we regularly share winning images. Thank you to everyone to submitted work this time around. We love seeing your images.

A Photographer Finds Terror and Magic on the Banks of a River (NSFW)

Indonesian photographer Aji Susanto Anom still carries with him the stories he heard as a child. In Javanese mythology, he says, the river is where people cast off their bad luck. When people make offerings here, evil spirits and unfortunate thoughts are thrown out into the water and left behind. At night, they linger there like ghosts.

Humankind’s Bizarre Relationship with Nature, In Photos

Victoria Crowned Pigeon, The National Aviary, Pittsburgh

Zebras, Carnegie Museum of Natural History, Pittsburgh

In the last four years, Emma Kisiel has spent a great deal of her time in natural history museums throughout the United States, perched outside of the dioramas featuring taxidermied animals. The children who visit with their parents often asked similar questions:”Are these real animals?” The parents, Kisiel reports, usually gave ambiguous answers. They might say, “They were real. Now they’re not” or “They’re not real. They’re dead.”

This Photographer’s Travel Diary Has an Important Point to Make

When Oakland photographer Cheryl Faux told us about the lack of black female representation in travel advertising, she suggested we do a simple Google image search of the word “tourist.” I tried it. Of the first 100 image results, only three included a woman of color. 97% of the photographs and illustrations featured white people, usually white couples and white men.

Faux recently visited Rome with friends. She saw the tourist sites, ate “hipster food,” and in Milan, she attended an EDM music festival full of rave teens with incredible clothes. She also took her camera with her and came home with a series of self-portraits.

Traveling While Black is a diary of her experience, a call for change, and a ray of hope. One of my favorite photographers once told me in confidence that every female photographer must go through “a phase of self-portraiture.” It’s a part of offsetting the male gaze that has dominated the industry for more than a century. If she was right, then perhaps what Faux does here is doubly important. She’s subverting the male gaze and the white gaze at the same time, becoming both the protagonist and the author of her own story. We asked her to tell us more.

Photos of Captive Animals That Will Stay With You After You Look Away

Malayan Sun Bear, Thailand 2008 © Jo-Anne McArthur

Lions, Lithuania 2016 © Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

Chimpanzee, Denmark 2016 © Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur met Mykoliukas the baboon at one of the many zoos she’s visited over the last decade. As she passed, his hands reached out and grabbed the bars of his cage. He tried to groom her, as he tries with many of the countless people who walk by. Over the course of the day, McArthur allowed him to groom her a few times, and he waited for her to return. When she left for the last time, he climbed to the top of his cage and strained his neck. He kept her in sight as long as he could.

McArthur writes about the lonesome baboon in her newest book Captive, which she created in zoos and aquaria in more than twenty countries around the world.

Coming of Age as a Girl in Gaza, in Photos

Yara and her brother waiting for their father to return with schwarma as an evening treat after a recent conflict ended.

Beauty is important everywhere. A girl shows off her Palestinian themed nails. Girls in Gaza are concerned with their appearance just like others around the world. A girl shows off her Palestinian themed nails after a recent bombing campaign.

When the Istanbul-based photojournalist Monique Jaques traveled to Gaza in 2012, she expected to see evidence of violence and war, and she did. But she also saw something else: pieces of herself as a preteen, teenager, and young woman, mirrored in the many girls who called this place their home. Over the course of five years, she came back to tell their stories, compiled in the upcoming book Gaza Girls: Growing Up in the Gaza Strip.

This Skillshare Class Made Me Want to Be a Photographer (Sponsored)

An Online Skillshare Class by trashhand

Image by Trashhand

I signed up for Skillshare, an online community of more than 2 million people, back in March, when I wanted to learn more about what was going on in the photo world. Skillshare offers more than 17,000 classes on everything from drawing and painting to calligraphy and cooking, and they’re offering Feature Shoot readers two free months of unlimited Premium classes. Of course, Skillshare’s photography classes are among the most popular, and the other day, I decided to take one called Street Photography: Capture the Life of Your City with Trashhand, one of their most popular instructors of all time.

Self Portraits by Senegalese Photographer Omar Victor Diop Recreate Historic Paintings

Omar Victor Diop, Don Miguel de Castro, Emissary of Congo (c. 1643-50)
From the series: Project Diaspora 2014
Pigment inkjet print on Harman Hahnemuhle paper 47 1/4 x 31 1/2 in. Edition of 8 + 2 APs
In 1643 or 1644, Don Miguel de Castro and two servants arrived as part of a delegation sent by the ruler of Sonho, a province of Congo, via Brazil to the Netherlands. One objective of the journey was to find a resolution to an internal conflict in Congo. Original painting attributed to Jaspar Beck or Albert Eckout.

Omar Victor Diop, A Moroccan man (1913)
From the series: Project Diaspora 2014
Pigment inkjet print on Harman Hahnemuhle paper 47 1/4 x 31 1/2 in. Edition of 8 + 2 APs
Jose Tapiro y Baro was a Catalan painter. One of his closest friends was the painter Maria? Fortuny with whom he shared an interest for Orientalism. He was a master of watercolor painting. Original Painting by Jose? Tapiro y Baro.

The great African proverb wisely observes, “Until the lions have their historians, tales of the hunt shall always glorify the hunter.”

The lion has arrived in the form of Omar Victor Diop, a rising star in the photography world. Born 1980, in Dakar, Senegal, Diop has inherited the great traditions of African studio photography and takes them to the next level in his new exhibition, Project Diaspora, currently on view at SCAD FASH Museum of Fashion + Film in Atlanta, GA, through August 18, 2017.

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