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Posts by: James Cave

Masahisa Fukase’s Landmark Photo Book Gets Republished

Any artist with a muse understands this person’s importance in their creative process. And if that muse is your wife, for example, the connection becomes all the more complex.

But what do you do if your muse leaves you, divorces you, breaks off the relationship? If you’re Masahisa Fukase, you channel your ensuing grief into your work and produce what would later become known as one of the most important photobooks of a generation.

Portraits Of Remarkable Birthmarks Challenge Us To See Others Differently

What do you see, truly see, when you look at strangers? Maybe you notice their clothes, hairstyle, the way they walk, or perhaps their skin color? How does that inform your perception of the person?

Copenhagen-based photographer Linda Hansen wants to challenge your notion of noticing others. In her new book, Naevus Flammeus, Hansen uses portraiture to explore how we perceive others who might not fit society’s definition of having a “normal appearance” — each of her subjects in the project were born with a skin condition called nevus flammeus (also known as a port-wine stain), a congenital vascular malformation that results in a light pink to deep red birthmark that, for the most part, generally tends to appear as if red wine was splashed across a person’s face or neck.

Portraits Depict Life In A Powerful New Zealand Gang

Casey Morton, a photographer based in New South Wales, Australia, wanted to document the contradictory existence of belonging to one of New Zealand’s most powerful gangs, the Black Power NZ. Formed in New Zealand by Maori and Polynesian men as a response to feeling marginalized in a colonized nation, they’re tough, live by their own creed, and are extremely exclusive.

Glass Mountains Glitter In The Israeli Desert

Dotting one of Israel’s most remote desert towns are enormous piles of jagged glass. “Tiny shards, millions of them, piled into rolling hills of green and brown,” Tel Aviv-based photographer Oded Balilty describes.

To some, they might seem nothing more than piles of broken glass in an otherwise barren landscape. But to Balilty, the represent the glittering completion of a symbolic cycle.

“It’s like sand dunes, literally, because glass is made from sand,” Balilty, who photographed the glass for a project called Glass Mountains, told National Geographic. “They put the glasses in the desert. It’s very symbolic. It’s like the bottles are dying there, and they get new life. It’s like ‘from dust to dust.’ So to be in the middle of this circle, it’s something that I really enjoy watching.”

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