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Posts tagged: fine art photography

Poignant, Playful Photos of the Stray Dogs of India

A hungry dog.

A stray puppy at Varanasi Ghat.

A kid plays with a street dog.

Mumbai photographer Neenad Joseph Arul used to be shy about approaching people, so instead, he turned to the dogs in his neighborhood. Unlike people, the stray animals were never judgmental, and they didn’t mind being photographed. Over time, what started for Arul as a simple lesson in street photography evolved into a longterm relationship with the city’s canine inhabitants.

Photos Imagine Trump As An Immigrant

Photographer Veronica Gabriela Cardenas wanted somehow to tell the stories of our country’s undocumented immigrants. She wanted to humanize their experience and their anxieties in the shadows of the Donald Trump Presidency. She also didn’t want to put them in any precarious situations by revealing their identities.

One Grandson’s Poetic Photos of His Widowed Grandfather

Harald Pettersson fell in love with Hjordis the first time he saw her. They lived on nearby farms in a Swedish village. They were twenty and fifteen years old, respectively, and it was the 1940s.

Some seventy years later, Harald and Hjordis were still very much in love when Hjordis passed away suddenly. Their grandson, photographer Erik Simander, returned to his parents’ house to help take care of the widowed Harald.

Voyeuristic Photos of Tokyo Commuters on the Way to Work

Michael Wolf makes rush hour last an eternity. Now in its forth edition, his smash-hit book Tokyo Compression– along with the coinciding exhibition by Blue Lotus Gallery chronicles countless weekday mornings on the city’s packed subway cars, where human bodies, their breath and their sweat, leave dewdrops of condensation on the glass.

Photos of the Eternal Kinship Shared by Women and Horses

As a child, Finnish photographer Wilma Hurskainen found horses enchanting, but she wasn’t permitted to ride them until she grew up. As an adult, the horses of her girlhood imaginings, make-believe figures from fairytales, were replaced with real-life animals, who lived and breathed and possessed temperaments entirely their own.

In some ways, her book The Woman Who Married a Horse (Kehrer Verlag), becomes a reconciliation of mankind’s idolization of horses with the true, and often more complex, nature of the animals themselves.

Photos Address Women and Their Complex Relationship with Domesticity

For most of history. Anonymous was a woman. – Virginia Woolf

Chicago-based photographer Patty Carroll‘s most recent project Anonymous Women is made up of a series of staged photographs using models, drapery and household objects to address women and their complex relationship with domesticity.  Having grown up in mid-century suburban Chicago during an era where suburban living was idealized, Carroll has since developed a deep fascination with the idea of home. In these highly saturated theatrical scenes, anonymous figures appear draped in cocoon-like textiles and are accessorized with chandeliers and other household objects to comment on the role of women in the home.

Don’t Miss Eggleston’s ‘Los Alamos’ on View at Foam in Amsterdam

William Eggleston, En Route to New Orleans, 1972-1974, from the series Los Alamos, 1965-1974 © Eggleston Artistic Trust / Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

William Eggleston, Memphis, 1965-1968, from the series Los Alamos, 1965-1974 © Eggleston Artistic Trust / Courtesy David Zwirner, New York/London

When he first started the project in 1966, a young William Eggleston had plans to publish the Los Alamos photographs over a series of 20 volumes. By the time the pictures were finally exhibited, 43 years had passed. They were published in 2003, when the photographer was in his mid-sixties.

One Father’s Photos of the Magic of Childhood

“As we age,” Kentucky photographer Adrian C. Murray says, “we tend to forget the wonder that comes with being young.”

The Colorblind Photographer Who Was Meant to Be an Astronaut

“My dream was to be an astronaut,” photographer and filmmaker Vinnoth Krishnan remembers of his childhood. He spent his days watching films like Alien and Blade Runner on VHS, rewinding to see his favorite parts over and over again. These scenes meant so much to him that he once accidentally started a fire while trying to recreate them with his parents’ electronics. Whenever his stomach hurt, he imagined a real alien squirming inside.

Nostalgic Photos from the Forgotten Corners of America

Ellensburg, Washington

Joplin, Missouri

Bob Greenspan has been a wanderer as far back as he can remember. As a boy living in Upstate New York, he and his family embarked on what his father named “Sunday rides.” He visited amusement parks with names like Enchanted Forest and Storybook Land. The toured power plants and stopped over at small-town museums. Sometimes they’d end up in Canada or stay overnight in a motel.

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