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Posts tagged: documentary photography

Photographer Journeys Around the Globe in Search of the Oldest Living Organisms

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La Llareta #0308-2B31 (2,000+ years old; Atacama Desert, Chile)

What looks like moss covering rocks is actually a very dense, flowering shrub that happens to be a relative of parsley, living in the extremely high elevations of the Atacama Desert.

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Dead Huon Pine adjacent to living population segment #1211-3609 (10,500 years old, Mount Read, Tasmania)

Fire destroyed much of this clonal colony of Huon Pines (as seen in this photograph) on Mount Read, Tasmania, but a substantial portion of it survived. The age of the colony was discovered by carbon dating ancient pollen found at the bottom of a nearby lakebed, which was genetically matched to the living colony.

For The Oldest Living Things in the World, Brooklyn-based photographer Rachel Sussman traveled to all seven earthly continents in search of the planet’s most resilient living organisms. Working backwards from the year zero, the photographer collaborated with some of the world’s top biologists and researchers to track down individual plants, corals, fungi, and bacteria that have persisted through at least 2,000 years to arrive at the present moment in human history.

Abandoned Room with a View

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© Pete Ryan / National Geographic / Offset

To see more of Pete Ryan’s work, please visit Offset.

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Modern American Ruins Photographed by Rob Dobi

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Windows of a sugar refinery factory © Rob Dobi / Offset

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Control panel in an abandoned power plant © Rob Dobi / Offset

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Abandoned bathroom in a hospital © Rob Dobi / Offset

Connecticut-based photographer Rob Dobi is drawn to abandoned buildings by a suspended sense of mystery, preferring to know very little about each location before his visit. These modern American ruins tell stories, Dobi explains, and he strives to capture the chapters that others might leave out. Before wrapping shooting on any given building, he might visit numerous times, examining details that reveal themselves throughout different times of day, as the light sharpens his surroundings.

Heartbreaking Photos Capture Shelter Dogs in the Minutes Preceding Euthanasia

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2011/06/13 11:44 a.m. Taiwanese Public Animal Shelter Time until Euthanized: 40 Minutes

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2011/10/24 12:09 p.m. Taiwanese Public Animal Shelter Time until Euthanized: 1.9 Hours

For Memento Mori, Taiwanese photographer Yun-Fei Tou captures the final minutes in the lives of hundreds of shelter dogs awaiting euthanasia. For each, he visits on the day of their predetermined deaths. In the last instants of their existence, he often plays with them, feeds them, and gives them a voice that has eluded them for much of their troubled lives.

Poignant Photos of Nuns Who Live in Complete Silence

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Sisters of Sclerder is photographer Ibolya Feher‘s documentation of the simple life of The Carmelite order in the south west of Cornwall, England, one of the oldest and strictest orders of Nuns in the Catholic faith. They go about their day in absolute silence save for prayer and two brief recreational periods, talking only when necessary. The Sisters take vows of obedience, poverty and chastity, dedicating their lives to communing with God and praying for the outside world. Residing in the 200-year-old Sclerder Abbey, the women and the monastery are rarely open to outsiders.

Feature Shoot Recommends: Top 10 Things for Photographers to Do in New York (October 20-26)

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© Stevie Nicks / Morrison Hotel Gallery

We at Feature Shoot are always on the lookout for new and exciting things going on in the world of photography, and we are thrilled to introduce a new weekly feature showcasing some of the many photo-related events, activities and shows happening in New York. Feature Shoot Recommends has something for everyone, from photojournalistic mavens to fine art enthusiasts, so be sure to check in each Monday for our top ten picks of the week. And next week we will launch our London edition!

Photo du Jour: Demolition Derby

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© Randy Harris / Offset

As a newcomer to the White Lake, New York area in 2006, photographer Randy Harris made a point of exploring some of the region’s idiosyncrasies, and he ventured onto the location of his first ever demolition derby, where he immediately jumped into the fray.

City Boys Hunting on a Gaming Reserve in Rural Spain

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In a world that is increasingly urban-focused, photographer Ricardo Cases documents the niche experience of city-dwellers traveling to the countryside for a holiday full of “real” rural living. In his series La Caza Del Lobo Congelado (“Frozen Wolf Hunt”), Cases spent time photographing at a Spanish gaming reserve, a popular tourist destination for businessmen and others to get a taste of the outdoors and the thrill of the hunt.

The Last Remaining Residents of an Estonian Shanty Town

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Tamara on the eve of moving day. She is embittered that the authorities would not let the old people die in peace: “We have created so much beauty here.” Tamara designed and erected the gates made of plastic pipes and rubber hoses herself. Krasota (Splendor)!

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Svetlana Ivnitskaya (57) is a most famous resident at Soodevhe shanty town. This spring (2014) she was a popular candidate for European Parliament election. Jobless, Ivnitskaya lives in a house that has no electricity, sharing it with her husband Boris and a goatherd.

In the 1960s just outside of Tallinn, Estonia, workers of a military factory were given free patches of land for people to plant gardens and grow vegetables. The location gradually became a sort of shanty town in the spirit of the Russian “dachas” (a small seasonal house away from the city), while some citizens chose to call it their permanent residence. Photographer Annika Haas captures the fading pieces of this eclectic culture, soon to be paved over in service of the nearby airport. Plane Watchers memorializes the spirit and stories of those who call the dacha district their home, cherishing each and every day until they are forced to leave.

Thought-Provoking Photos of Peruvian Immigrants with their New ‘Families’ and Holding Photos of Relatives They Left Behind

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For Frontiers, Chile-based photographer Raul Charlin documents some of the many Peruvian women who have emigrated to Chile to work as caregivers and domestic workers. He constructs two portraits of each woman; the first positions her in relation to her employer’s family, while the second finds her alone, accompanied by a snapshot of the relatives she has left in Peru. For these women, Charlin explains, caring for the children and elderly members from their employers’ families is a means of providing for their own.