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Posts tagged: documentary photography

Beautiful Images of the Arctic Expose a Darker Truth

The Arctic is melting faster than any other place in the world. NY City-based photographer Diane Tuft set out to document the area before the effects of global warming cause this landscape to vanish forever. During the summers of 2015 and 2016, Tuft travelled by plane, boat and helicopter to photograph the mountain glaciers of Svalbard, Norway, the Arctic Ocean’s sea ice and the ice bergs and ice sheet of Greenland witnessing for herself the incredible beauty and fragility of the region.

Call for Entries: The RPS International Photography Exhibition

Rose in a Fox Mask © Melanie Eclare

Abrigo Corner 1 © Tom Blachford

The International Photography Exhibition by The Royal Photographic Society has been a fixture of the photography community since 1854, just fifteen years after the invention and introduction of practical photography. Now in it’s 160th year, the IPE is the single longest-running photography competition of its kind, allowing contemporary photographers to follow in the footsteps of early exhibitors like Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Steichen, and Roger Fenton.

For this year’s worldwide call for submissions, the RPS has once again opened its doors to photographers of all backgrounds, working in all genres. As always, there is no fixed theme, making IPE one of the most consistently diverse photography exhibitions in the world.

The Iconic 1940s Photographer Who Never Wanted to Be Famous

“LaSalle at Amsterdam” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

“125th Street” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

The photographs arrived at The Curator Gallery in a box meant for curator Bill Shapiro, the former editor of Life magazine. When he saw the first few pictures, the curator wondered if he could possibly be looking at the work of a Life photographer he didn’t recognize. He had never heard of the man behind the hundred-some images inside the box.

As it turned out, the package had been left for him by Betsy Evans, a friend of the late photographer Todd Webb, who left behind an extensive archive. Though the elusive photographer had never been at Life, Webb shared a time, a place, and a sensibility with those who had. He was friends with Life staffer Gordon Parks. He also worked and played alongside Walker Evans, Ansel Adams, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott, and Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O’Keeffe.

One Photographer’s Fight for the Hudson River in New York

“This is our Standing Rock,” photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood says of the Hudson River.

Photos of the Last Remaining American Drive-In Theaters

Frontier Drive-In, Center, Colorado. Abandoned
“The Frontier Drive-In was possibly my favorite location that in hindsight I wish I had given more time to. As we drove down this long highway surrounded by nothing, we were heading straight towards the biggest rain cloud I have ever seen. As soon as we had the theatre in our sights, the torrential rain started. My assistant and I sat in the car for nearly an hour, until finally we got a 10-minute break in the rain.”

East Hartford Drive-In, South Windsor, Connecticut. Abandoned
“The shoot at East Hartford was very special because I got to create a photograph that had been in my head since the beginning of this project. I found a model who also had an amazing vintage car he was willing to drive back into the unmaintained lot. Of course it started to rain as soon as we arrived, so I had to work quickly, but we were able to create one of my favorite images from the trip.”

In the summer of 2014, Portland photographer Lindsey Rickert packed up her life and hit the road in search of drive-in movie theaters around the county. Some had been closed and deserted; others had adapted to a swiftly-changing market and were still in business. In total, she spent over two months in her car, traversing an estimated 12,022 miles across the United States.

Magical Photos from the World’s Surviving Tribes

Suri Girl with Orchid Wreath, Ethiopia

Sisters Meal Festival Dancer in Guizhou, China

Photographer Terri Gold says she wants to find “the grace notes” of humanity. She has vivid memories of spinning an old-fashioned globe as a child, and as an adult, she dreams of faraway places and the secrets they keep hidden.

Gold has devoted much of her life to visiting the Indigenous tribal communities of our planet. The longterm project Still Points in a Turning World has taken her to Namibia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, India, and China. She’s camped under the desert skies with the Wodaabe nomads, and she’s watched the sunrise over the villages of the Omo Valley, where people paint their bodies and adorn themselves with plants and shells and bones. She has driven through the hairpin turns of the mountains of Guizhou, a landscape etched with 2000-year-old rice terraces.

‘The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags’ Shows You How to Be Successful on Instagram

At Feature Shoot, we find a lot of our stories on Instagram. It’s one of the top places we search for new and emerging talent, and we’re not the only ones.

“When I assign, I look at a photographer’s Instagram presence first,” Kerri MacDonald, Social Media Photo Editor at The New York Times, told us. Olivier Laurent, editor TIME’s photo website LightBox, agrees: “I constantly use Instagram to discover new talents. One can learn a lot about a photographer’s vision, identity and commitment through her or his Instagram feed.”

Hashtags are the key to making your work visible to photo editors, curators, and potential clients. Many editors, including the editors of Feature Shoot, search through their favorite hashtags every single day. “Hashtags have helped companies and brands discover my work and then hire me to produce content for them” photographer Joshua K. Jackson says, “I’ve also sold fine art prints to people through my website after they found my profile under specific tags on Instagram.”

It can be hard to know what hashtags to use. Hashtags that are too general aren’t useful. If you tag your photos #photography, for instance, they’ll get lost in a sea of nearly 100 million images, so they key is getting specific.

That’s why we partnered with Photoshelter to create The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags. The comprehensive guide covers hashtags specific to eleven genres of photography, some of which might overlap: Travel, Portraits, Black and White, Street, Architecture, Minimalism, Documentary, Landscape, Film, Fine Art, and Drones/Aerial.

Readers of the The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags will find 67 specific hashtags to use for increased exposure and potential opportunities. We cover two different types of hashtags. “Searchable” hashtags are popular hashtags photo editors often use to search for content, whereas “Submittable” hashtags can be used to submit work directly to an influential feed, where it can be seen by a wide audience. Our hashtag, #myfeatureshoot, is an example of a submittable hashtag. To date, nearly half a million images have been submitted to our feed via Instagram, and we spotlight some of our our favorites every day.

Additionally, the guide includes insider tips from curators, influencers, editors, and photographers about how and when to use hashtags to suit your particular set of needs. We also gained insight into what leading photography Instagram accounts look for when searching for content.

The Photographer’s Guide to Hashtags was produced by Feature Shoot in collaboration with Photoshelter. Get you free copy today.

A Look at Life for a Refugee Family Before Trump

Shaimaa and Haider crammed for the U.S. citizenship exam together. Shaimaa took the oath on January 14, 2015, and Haider followed three months later. “I finally saw a future,” he says. During the ceremony, the judge let Karar sit in one of the jury seats. “That made me feel wonderful,” he recalls.

America drove the Bahar family from their country. Then it gave them a new one.

Shedding Light on the Suffering of Animals in Captivity

The path to truth is a long and arduous road, traveled by the few who can withstand the slings of arrows and bows. It takes courage and strength to allow the myths to fall away and stand face to face with the cold heart of reality. Photographer Colleen Plumb set for on this path many years ago, looking to understand the relationship between wo/man and animal that we have inherited from our ancestors.

A Poignant Portrait of Survivors of the Holocaust

I set out to do something with meaning. Being fortunate enough to have met and photographed these remarkable people has certainly felt meaningful to me. – Harry Borden

Having spent most of his career photographing celebrities, celebrated portrait photographer Harry Borden decided it was time for a change. His project Survivor, which culminated into what would become his first-ever book containing over a hundred portraits of Holocaust survivors, was not only an attempt to create an important historical artifact, but also an exploration of his own cultural heritage.

Growing up with a Jewish father, Borden recalls his father telling him that the Nazis would have killed ‘people like us’. He also remembers the shock this statement roused in him. Describing his dad as “a resolute atheist Jew who derived nothing from his background except a fear of anti-Semitism,” Borden writes in the book’s introduction: “I think it was my dad’s ambivalence towards his heritage – and his disturbing revelation that it had once been deemed punishable by death – that really motivated me to create this body of work.”

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