Menu

Posts tagged: documentary photography

This Photographer’s Travel Diary Has an Important Point to Make

When Oakland photographer Cheryl Faux told us about the lack of black female representation in travel advertising, she suggested we do a simple Google image search of the word “tourist.” I tried it. Of the first 100 image results, only three included a woman of color. 97% of the photographs and illustrations featured white people, usually white couples and white men.

Faux recently visited Rome with friends. She saw the tourist sites, ate “hipster food,” and in Milan, she attended an EDM music festival full of rave teens with incredible clothes. She also took her camera with her and came home with a series of self-portraits.

Traveling While Black is a diary of her experience, a call for change, and a ray of hope. One of my favorite photographers once told me in confidence that every female photographer must go through “a phase of self-portraiture.” It’s a part of offsetting the male gaze that has dominated the industry for more than a century. If she was right, then perhaps what Faux does here is doubly important. She’s subverting the male gaze and the white gaze at the same time, becoming both the protagonist and the author of her own story. We asked her to tell us more.

Photos of Captive Animals That Will Stay With You After You Look Away

Malayan Sun Bear, Thailand 2008 © Jo-Anne McArthur

Lions, Lithuania 2016 © Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

Chimpanzee, Denmark 2016 © Jo-Anne McArthur / Born Free Foundation

Photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur met Mykoliukas the baboon at one of the many zoos she’s visited over the last decade. As she passed, his hands reached out and grabbed the bars of his cage. He tried to groom her, as he tries with many of the countless people who walk by. Over the course of the day, McArthur allowed him to groom her a few times, and he waited for her to return. When she left for the last time, he climbed to the top of his cage and strained his neck. He kept her in sight as long as he could.

McArthur writes about the lonesome baboon in her newest book Captive, which she created in zoos and aquaria in more than twenty countries around the world.

Coming of Age as a Girl in Gaza, in Photos

Yara and her brother waiting for their father to return with schwarma as an evening treat after a recent conflict ended.

Beauty is important everywhere. A girl shows off her Palestinian themed nails. Girls in Gaza are concerned with their appearance just like others around the world. A girl shows off her Palestinian themed nails after a recent bombing campaign.

When the Istanbul-based photojournalist Monique Jaques traveled to Gaza in 2012, she expected to see evidence of violence and war, and she did. But she also saw something else: pieces of herself as a preteen, teenager, and young woman, mirrored in the many girls who called this place their home. Over the course of five years, she came back to tell their stories, compiled in the upcoming book Gaza Girls: Growing Up in the Gaza Strip.

This Skillshare Class Made Me Want to Be a Photographer (Sponsored)

An Online Skillshare Class by trashhand

Image by Trashhand

I signed up for Skillshare, an online community of more than 2 million people, back in March, when I wanted to learn more about what was going on in the photo world. Skillshare offers more than 17,000 classes on everything from drawing and painting to calligraphy and cooking, and they’re offering Feature Shoot readers two free months of unlimited Premium classes. Of course, Skillshare’s photography classes are among the most popular, and the other day, I decided to take one called Street Photography: Capture the Life of Your City with Trashhand, one of their most popular instructors of all time.

Revisiting the Civil Rights Movement in New Photo Book by Steve Schapiro

Along the march for voting rights, Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, 1965.

James Baldwin joined the fight for equality in the South. Mostly, he offered a passionate voice for justice and a plea for a nation’s salvation. In Mississippi in 1963, he visited the NAACP’s Medgar Evers, who was slain later that June, following President Kennedy’s landmark televised address on civil rights. This photo was recently discovered in the photographer’s contact sheets.

James Baldwin penned fire to purify truth and liberate it from the lies that have clouded United States history ever since Thomas Jefferson wrote The Declaration of Independence. With every sentence, Baldwin burned away the toxic stench of injustice, oppression, and pathology that so many cling to until their dying day.

One of Baldwin’s greatest works is The Fire Next Time, a collection of two essays originally published by The New Yorker and subsequently published by Dial Press in 1963 in book form. The essays, “My Dungeon Shook — Letter to my Nephew on the One Hundredth Anniversary of Emancipation,” and “Down At The Cross — Letter from a Region of My Mind” address the issues facing African Americans during the height of the Civil Rights Movement, as they faced down the horrors of the past and present each and every single day.

Now, Taschen introduces James Baldwin. The Fire Next Time, a collector’s edition of 1,963 copies reprinted in a letterpress edition with more than 100 photographs taken by Steve Schapiro while he was on assignment for LIFE magazine. Schapiro was on the frontlines of the movement as it marched across the South facing down the system of apartheid under Jim Crow.

Submit to the 2017 ‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest for a Chance at $15,000 (Sponsored)

Galactic Rainbow © Michael Trofimov

Only one week left to enter! Submit your work by August 7th for a chance at $15,000 and other prizes!

In the last year, you might have encountered Greg Gulbransen’s photograph of a polar bear in Manitoba, Canada. Fire on Ice was taken during a frigid day, just as the strong sunlight was evaporating the ice. Gulbransen’s fingers froze, and he worried his camera battery wouldn’t survive the cold. It’s a breathtaking photograph, but it’s also a resonant and symbolic one in this era– a moment in time when melting sea ice is threatening polar bear populations around the world. It’s no surprise Fire on Ice took home the $15,000 Grand Prize at the 2016 It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest, presented by The Weather Channel and Toyota.

2016 Grand Prize Winner: Fire on Ice © Greg Gulbransen

From now until August 7th, the fourth annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest is open for entries. Jurors will select images based on technical excellence, creativity, and adherence to one of three main themes: nature, adventure, and weather. The “nature” category includes any and all images telling stories about flora, fauna, and landscape; “adventure” images should be about exploring the great outdoors, and of course, “weather” photographs should capture the elements.

Photos of Lonely Strangers in the Streets of NYC at Night

“The people in the photos are all strangers,” NYC photographer and filmmaker Daniel Soares tells us, “And I make up these stories in my head, about why they are going to get beer or cigarettes at 1:00 AM.” He’s created Neon Nights over the course of many midnight walks through the hushed side-streets of the city.

On Lake Chad, People Are Living on One Meal a Day

A chipped bowl containing a few grains of rice and some dried beans. Grains are in short supply because the government has banned farmers from allowing their crops to grow more than three feet tall along Cameroon’s highways. Militants had been hiding in the fields in order to ambush passing convoys.

Not so long ago, Lake Chad was one of the largest bodies of water in Africa. The thick reeds and vital wetlands around its basin provided vast freshwater reserves, breeding grounds for fish, fertile soil for agriculture, and grasslands where farmers grazed their animals. But as climate change has taken its toll, the lake has shrunk by 90 percent. Today, only 965 square miles remain. Those who still live by the lake struggle to survive, beset by chronic drought and the slow onset of ecological catastrophe.

This looming crisis has only worsened with the rise of Boko Haram, which has driven some 74,000 Nigerians into neighboring Cameroon. More refugees and fewer crops have proven to be a deadly combination in a region already ravaged by climate change. More than seven million people around Lake Chad are now suffering from severe hunger, including 500,000 children wracked by acute malnutrition. Those fortunate enough to be granted a spot in a refugee camp often receive no more than one meal a day.

We often turn away from images of the starving and hungry, from the skeletal profiles and ­hollowed­­-­out eyes that attest to the misery and suffering. But photographer Chris de Bode has found a way to focus our attention on this forgotten crisis. A single vegetable, a dried fish, a bowl of red maize—sometimes this is all a mother has to divide between her children each day. She may have to choose to feed her two youngest and send the teenagers to a village to beg for food. These images do not ask us to look into their eyes and see ourselves. They ask us to look at the emptiness of their bowls and reflect on the fullness of our own. We see their hunger through what little they have. We measure their suffering in the most universal unit of all: a single meal.

Read the rest of Lisa Palmer’s article on Chris de Bode’s photographs at The New Republic.

Photos of a Strange and Beautiful Australian Mining Town

In 2008, French photographer Antoine Bruy spent a year in Australia. When he returned home, he planned to bring with him more than a hundred rolls of film. All of them were lost. “Since then, I kept thinking of going back, to do something about this place,” the artist says.

Heartfelt Photos of a Father Near the End of His Life

Dad, 84 yrs old, Omachi, Kamakura, Dec 2014

Dad, 86 yrs old, Sagamihara, May 2017

In April 2014, Japanese photographer Shin Noguchi took a picture of his father. A doctor had recently diagnosed 83-year-old with Stage IV Lung Cancer, but Noguchi hadn’t yet told his dad the news. “It was the first time I had a secret about my father that he didn’t know himself,” Noguchi remembers. Over the last three years, he has continued to photograph his father.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get some visual inspiration into your day!