Menu

Posts tagged: documentary photography

Eerie Photos of Feral Parrots in Tokyo

Yoshinori_Mizutani_01

Yoshinori_Mizutani_10

“Parrots should not be in Tokyo,” writes photographer Yoshinori Mizutani of the hundreds of green parakeets that have nested in the city’s trees. He’s right: the birds are not native to Japan. They arrived in the 1960s and 1970s as part of the country’s trend toward purchasing exotic species as pets. The rose-ringed parakeets were brought in from their natural habitats in India and Sri Lanka, and when their owners found them too loud and unsuitable for domestic life, they simply let the creatures loose in the city to fend for themselves. Some of the birds were lost or broke free during importation.

Incredible Moments of Tenderness Found In the Struggling Mill Towns of Pittsburgh

Dan_Wetmore_01

Dan_Wetmore_06

When photographer Dan Wetmore set out to capture the neighborhoods surrounding the abandoned steel mills of Pittsburgh, he was met at times with incredulity as some believe the area to be little more than an industrial wasteland. As a child living in Pittsburgh, Wetmore was drawn to the abandoned steel mills that remained from the city’s industrial growth in the early to mid-20th century, pouring over Becher monographs in search of photographs of furnaces and structures that spoke to his boyhood enchantment. As an adult, Wetmore ventured into the mill towns for his series Jubilee Kitchen I and II, unveiling moments of unexpected rebirth in the struggling neighborhoods shadowed by its industrial history.

We’re All Nudists Under Our Clothes: ‘Lake Como’ Explores Those Who Live Life in the Buff (NSFW)

Katty Ryan Hoover

Katty Ryan Hoover

One of the primary fascinations of photography—for both the picture makers and the viewers—is the desire to examine the lives of others: those who live or experience differently than what is familiar to that person. Tampa-based photographer Katty Ryan Hoover’s Lake Como explores a way of life unfamiliar, even unfathomable, to many of us: living in the nude.

Welcome to Syden: Portraits of Norwegians Enjoying Their Offbeat Vacations

Knut_Egil_Wang_11

Knut_Egil_Wang_04

To foreigners, Syden sounds like a fantasy holiday destination accessible only to Norwegians, and it kind of is. In Norway, the word Syden is often referenced in lieu of certain European, Asian, African, and South American cities with a warm climate, mainly in or near the Mediterranean. From season to season, the exact locations of Syden may change as certain places go in and out of fashion. For his book Southbound, photographer Knut Egil Wang explores the nuances of these unidentifiable, transient havens, shooting in such hot spots as Gran Canaria, Mallorca, Murcia, and Torrevieja in Spain, Ayia Napa and Larnaca in Cyprus, Side and Alanya in Turkey, and Krabi in Thailand.

Photo du Jour: Sunbathing

Anais_Boileau_01

For Plein Soleil, French photographer Anaïs Boileau captures the curious culture of sunbathing that permeates summer in the south of France and Spain, including La Grande Motte, Lanzarote, and Barcelona. In Boileau’s surreal portraits, the women appear as if suspended in time, sedated and made oblivious of their surroundings by the rays that tan their skin. As she lays spellbound in a colorful swimsuit and an outlandish pair of sun goggles, an unnamed female figure peers upwards, imploring the sun for an elusive honey glow that lies just out of reach.

Image © Anaïs Boileau 2014

Zed Nelson’s ‘A Portrait of Hackney’ Depicts the Mélange of Cultures in a Gentrifying East London Neighborhood

Zed Nelson

Zed Nelson

For many of our readers the story of waves of hipsters gentrifying previously undesirable neighborhoods, eventually and circumstantially pushing out the previous communities, will be a familiar one. For photographer Zed Nelson, Hackney, the East London neighborhood where he grew up and still lives, has provided him with rich fodder for A Portrait of Hackney, published by Hoxton Mini Press

Arresting Photos of Los Israelitas, an Evangelical Community in Peru

Stan Raucher

A Sabbath Prayer

Stan Raucher

To the Sanctuary

Those who choose to live outside the norm, especially those who follow a religious leader, captivate the public imagination. Seattle-based photographer Stan Raucher felt this draw when, after a photo workshop in Peru in 2013, he happened to end up traveling down the Amazon River by boat with several members of Los Israelitas, a small, evangelical sect in Peru who live along the riverbank. For his project The New Promised LandRaucher made two trips to visit the community and plans to return next year. He spoke with me via email about the project, which I saw in Critical Mass 2013.

Photo du Jour: The Selfie Promenade

noname

For The Self Promenade, photographers Luisa Dörr and Navin Kala document the many selfies shot along the Avenue of Stars in Hong Kong, where young people from around China travel for shopping, sightseeing, and photo-ops. As selfies become an ever more popular form of self-expression, Dörr and Kala suggest that these kinds of images are a means of asserting the self in a world dominated in large part by Western, and particularly American, popular culture.

VINE Sanctuary: A Refuge for Animals (and Humans) in Vermont

Selena Salfen

Cheryl and Norman, the Former Veal Steer

Selena Salfen

Miriam and the Latest Rescues

Animal rights is a polarizing subject, with the immediate power to cause reactionary arguments, even if one is simply noisily declaring one’s position. Sanctuary is Minneapolis-based photographer Selena Salfen‘s project on VINE Sanctuary, a group in Vermont that provides “a haven for animals who have escaped or been rescued from the meat, dairy, and egg industries or other abusive circumstances, such as cockfights or pigeon-shoots.”

Photo du Jour: Feeding an Orphaned Elephant

Lisa_Limer_79624 © Lisa Limer / Offset

Gazing into the curious eyes of a baby elephant, photographer Lisa Limer captures a bottle feeding at the elephant orphanage in Nairobi, Kenya. As the African Elephants face the threat of capture, abuse, starvation, and death, The David Sheldrick Wildlife Trust is a haven for the noble creatures. Through their renowned Orphan’s Project, they have rescued more than 150 infant elephants and rhinoceroses from dire situations brought on my poaching and habitat devastation.