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Posts tagged: documentary photography

Remembering the Horrific Exile of Thousands of People

Fatima Uzhakhova, Ingush, was a granddaughter of biggest landlord in the Caucasus. Her family was split: some were repressed as “public enemies” of the Soviets, andothers joined the Bolsheviks. In 1944, the family was exiled to Kazakhstan with thousands of others. In exile, Fatima’s mother was sentenced to five years of jail for breaking a rule: she crossed the frontier of her exile zone. Fatima had to survive on her own since the age of 9.

Chechen elders pose by the ancestry towers, which were ruined by the Soviets, rebuilt, then ruined again by the Russian army, and rebuilt again.

73 years ago today, the lives of nearly half a milion Chechen and Ingush people changed forever when Stalin ordered their deportation to remote parts of the Soviet Union. More than a third never returned, and the lives of the ones who did were already altered irreversibly. Russian photographer Dmitri Beliakov has been working in the North Caucasus since 1994 and came to learn about this dark chapter of history. As the witnesses of the exile were one by one disappearing, Beliakov felt time was slipping away. His project The Ordeal is the last chance to preserve their memory.

Paul Nicklen Captures the Beauty and Fragility of the Polar Regions

To counter contemporary political discourses denying climate change, we need only turn our heads to the polar regions to understand the urgency of protecting these fragile yet beautiful ecosystems. Canadian-born Paul Nicklen is a photographer, marine biologist and conservationist. He knows that the Arctic region is warming up twice as fast as anywhere on the planet, and has witnessed and documented the staggering effects of this rise in temperature firsthand. Glaciers are receding, wildlife populations are struggling to adapt to their new environment, urban areas are threatened by rising sea levels—an oil spill could prove catastrophic, both for the animal and human inhabitants of these vulnerable regions. In his book Polar Obsession and the corresponding exhibition organized by National Geographic at the David Bower Centre, the artist hopes to dispel myths and encourage others to enjoy, treasure and help protect these lands and creatures.

Tales From a Street Photographer in St. Petersburg

When I asked Alexander Petrosyan to tell me why St. Petersburg is a great place for street photography, he answered honestly. It isn’t. It’s usually freezing, and the streets are never well-lit. The streets are mostly empty because everyone is always in a hurry to get someplace. He takes pictures here not because it’s easy but because it’s been his home for more than four decades.

A Death Photographer on the Sacred River Ganges

Warning: this article contains images of dead bodies.

The expression “when one door closes, another opens” seems apt when Italian photographer Matteo de Mayda recounts the tale of how this series began. When a project to photograph India’s bicycle inventors fell through at the very last moment, de Mayda found himself in Bombay desperate for a story. By chance, he stumbled across a local video report on the death photographers of Varanasi. On hearing the report, De Mayda wasted no time and caught a 30-hour third class train to the holy city.

The Only Spaces for Intimacy in Romanian Jails

When Romania became part of the European Union in 2007, the country had adjustments to make. Among them was that every jail in the country had to have an ‘intimate room,’ a place for inmates to spend private time with their partners. Over the course of several years, Cosmin Bumbut photographed these newly-created cells in all of the country’s 40 penitentiaries. His photo series, Intimate Room, is a complete documentation of these artificially created spaces for intimacy.

20 Years of Protest in NYC, in Photos

Brooklyn, 1991. A woman walks by a line of police during the Crown Heights race riots in Brooklyn. This was a three-day racial riot that occurred from August 19th to 21st and pitted African American and Caribbean Americans against Jewish residents. © Mark Peterson

Pro-choice demonstrators in downtown Manhattan protest the July 3rd, 1989 Supreme Court Webster decision which limited Roe V Wade. This was a turning point in the pro-choice movement. 24 were arrested, including activist Mary Lou Greenberg, as they stormed the Brooklyn Bridge. © Nina Berman / NOOR

When photo editor Meg Handler and historian Tamar Carroll first started talks in 2014 about what would later become the exhibition Whose Streets? Our Streets! at the Bronx Documentary Center, Donald Trump had not yet announced his bid for President of the United States. Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Freddie Gray, and Alton Sterling were all still alive. The Black Lives Matter movement was in its infancy.

These Majestic Photos Capture a Disappearing Way of Life

In 2001, California-based photographer Oliver Klink embarked on a project to document the disappearing traditions and customs across Asia as modernization and cultural homogenization takes its toll. “When the Three George Dam was completed, the water level rose by over 100 meters (300 ft),” says Klink, and he saw the displacement of 1 million people from the edge of the Yangtze River. This proved to be just one example of how such communities are being affected by the change.

Visions of Iceland from a Remote Sheep Farm

In her remote corner of Iceland, photographer Marzena Skubatz makes her home in a sheep farm and weather station.

The Woman Who Wanted to Photograph Every House in Poland

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

Zofia Rydet mentioned in one of her letters that taking photos for her is like vodka to an alcoholic,” curator Sebastian Cichocki says of the 20th century photographer, “It’s like an addiction, so she collects more and more and more and she’s never satisfied.”

Animated Gifs Tell a Story of War and Hope on ‘Syria Street’

Abbas, Shopkeeper, Bab al-Tabbaneh

Nisrine’s family, Bab al-Tabbaneh

Hana Awad working, Bab al-Tabbaneh

“People get used to war,” photographer Brandon Tauszik says. Daily life doesn’t halt in the face of trauma; it persists in the background. It’s something photojournalists in Syria, like Nish Nalbandian and Ali Khara, have stressed over and over again. And it’s happening forty minutes from the boarder in Tripoli, where two neighborhoods remain locked in a shaky and precarious situation.

Tauszik embarked on the multi-media project Syria Street alongside the International Committee of the Red Cross, spending ten days on the thoroughfare that separates the mostly Sunni population of Bab al-Tabbaneh from the largely Alawite community of Jabal Mohsen.

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