Menu

Posts tagged: documentary photography

A suicide prevention app made by and for Aboriginal people

Three Aboriginal people take their lives every week in Australia. According to the Australian Youth Development Index  (YDI), the suicide rate for young indigenous men is the highest in the world—a frightening statistic that indigenous people want to confront.

“One might point to alcohol, poverty and illness as influencing factors” says photographer and cultural historian Judith Crispin, who has worked extensively with the Warlpiri people, “but I share the prevailing view of indigenous elders that the primary reason for suicides in our Aboriginal population is that people have been cut off from their culture. Without culture, the connection to country is difficult to find—and without connection to a country a person becomes lost”.

Photos Offer an Unflinching Look at Modern Russia

“We tolerate today for the sake of a good tomorrow,” Russian photographer Alexander Anufriev said when I asked him about the country he calls home, “but tomorrow never comes.”

Recreating London’s Iconic Reggae Record Covers, in Photos

Dandy Livingstone, Your Musical Doctor (Downtown, 1969), 46 years later

Various, Harder Shade of Black (Santic, 1974), 42 years later.

London photographer Alex Bartsch doesn’t know how many vinyl records are in his collection, but he has tracked down the exact spots where 42 of their covers were shot. He has biked all over the city, album covers in hand, stepping back in time and reconstructing a visual history of reggae from 1967 and 1987. Covers, now available for pre-order, is the result of his adventures.

The Trauma of Life on Skid Row, in Photos

Genevine and Jennifer

Old Roses

Little Cat, Skid Row

Los Angeles photographer Suzanne Stein recently posted a picture of a badly abused, sick cat from Skid Row on her Instagram feed.

In my mind, it’s a photograph that could not have been made by anyone but Stein. She has been photographing life on Skid Row since the fall of 2015, and in the last year, she has borne witness to the acute suffering of others. She’s heard firsthand from survivors of rape and abuse. She’s befriended people who are addicted to heroin. She’s been in the presence of infections and illness, true life and death situations. And throughout all of it, a fundamental decency and humanity have remained at the heart of all her images. 

Powerful Photos of the Heavy Metal Queens of Botswana

Florah Dylon-Son Younggal Bison

Millie Hans, a woman in Botswana, had just gotten home from work. She cooked dinner for her children, changed into her leather pants, and rocked out to the Battle Hymn by Manowar, a heavy metal song with lyrics like “Gone are the days, when freedom shone – now blood and steel meet bone.” This is the moment South African photographer Paul Shiakallis remembers most from his time photographing the female members of the Marok community, Botswana’s metalhead subculture. “We sang together like it was a church service,” he remembers.

On the Go: Faces of an American Youth Subculture

Sherie & Allister, New Orleans, LA. 2016 © Michael Joseph, Courtesy Daniel Cooney Fine Art, NY

They are on the move across the United States, and sometimes the world, catching rides wherever they can, by freight train or by car, living by their own set of rules. They are known as Travelers, people who call the open road their home, guided by wanderlust. Boston photographer Michael Joseph has devoted nearly six years of his life to documenting Travelers through intimate portraiture.

Wonder and Violence on the Bering Sea

Blind Leader © Corey Arnold

Red Fox in Dutch Harbor, Alaska © Corey Arnold

Octopus Bait © Corey Arnold

As a child, Corey Arnold traveled the open seas in his imagination. He’s fished since he was in diapers, first as a hobbyist with his father and later as a commercial fisherman. He took his first deckhand job in 1995, and he’s since spent hundreds of days and nights catching sockeye salmon, halibut, codfish, and king crab, navigating howling winds and violent waves.

Poignant Photos of Animals Rescued From Abuse

Diane and Buddy at Catskill Animal Sanctuary © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

Running piglets at Farm Sanctuary © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals

In the summer of 2012, a heavily pregnant pig at a factory farm was beaten with an electric prod and a metal pole because she wouldn’t move from her crate. The sow screamed through the ordeal. When it was caught on audio tape, the SPCA and Farm Sanctuary’s Emergency Rescue Team were able to remove her from the farm. When the pig finally entered the safety of the rescue trailer, she collapsed in exhaustion and was immediately brought to a veterinarian at Cornell. This was the start of her new life.

A Look Behind-the-Scenes in an Animal Rescue Mission

Activist from Animal Equality carries lamb out of factory farm during an open rescue ƒ Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

Activist protectively cradles hen during open rescue © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Equality

Activist carries one of the rescued piglets out of the factory farm © Jo-Anne McArthur / Animal Liberation Victoria

In 2013, photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur accompanied activists from Animal Liberation Victoria as they entered a pig farm in the dead of night. Inside the farm’s “sick bay,” they found about thirty ill and injured animals. Some had a green “X” spray-painted on their backs, meaning they were too ill to be of use to the farm and would be killed soon. That night, the activists picked out three of the doomed piglets and carried them out into the open air.

Shocking Photos Taken Behind-the-Scenes at Puppy Mills

Dogs in their cages at a puppy mill before being rescued. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals with the Montreal SPCA

A recently rescued dog receives care. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals with the Montreal SPCA

A recently rescued dog receives care. © Jo-Anne McArthur / We Animals with the Montreal SPCA

In 2013, photojournalist Jo-Anne McArthur was with the SPCA when they seized approximately 100 dogs from a puppy mill in rural Quebec. After a lifetime of living in confinement, about half a dozen pit bull-type were finally led into the open air. Their tails, once firmly tucked between their legs, started to relax. The rescuers spoke softly and offered their hands for the animals to sniff. Little by little, the wagging began.

Subscribe to our newsletter

Get some visual inspiration into your day!