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The Only Spaces for Intimacy in Romanian Jails

When Romania became part of the European Union in 2007, the country had adjustments to make. Among them was that every jail in the country had to have an ‘intimate room,’ a place for inmates to spend private time with their partners. Over the course of several years, Cosmin Bumbut photographed these newly-created cells in all of the country’s 40 penitentiaries. His photo series, Intimate Room, is a complete documentation of these artificially created spaces for intimacy.

20 Years of Protest in NYC, in Photos

Brooklyn, 1991. A woman walks by a line of police during the Crown Heights race riots in Brooklyn. This was a three-day racial riot that occurred from August 19th to 21st and pitted African American and Caribbean Americans against Jewish residents. © Mark Peterson

Pro-choice demonstrators in downtown Manhattan protest the July 3rd, 1989 Supreme Court Webster decision which limited Roe V Wade. This was a turning point in the pro-choice movement. 24 were arrested, including activist Mary Lou Greenberg, as they stormed the Brooklyn Bridge. © Nina Berman / NOOR

When photo editor Meg Handler and historian Tamar Carroll first started talks in 2014 about what would later become the exhibition Whose Streets? Our Streets! at the Bronx Documentary Center, Donald Trump had not yet announced his bid for President of the United States. Eric Garner, Sandra Bland, Freddie Gray, and Alton Sterling were all still alive. The Black Lives Matter movement was in its infancy.

Haunting Visions of the Sprawling American West

French photographer Emmanuel Monzon thinks living in the United States is like living inside a painting. In his meticulously crafted American scenes, all humans have vacated the premises, leaving behind only the background they once inhabited.

The Forgotten History Of The Koreans Of Mexico And Cuba

To many it might come as a surprise to learn that there are Korean-Mexicans and Korean-Cubans, though with this revelation it becomes imperative to come to terms with the largely forgotten tragedy which befell their ancestors. In 1905, 1,033 Koreans boarded the SS Ilford to Mexico. It was imagined and portrayed as a journey towards prosperity in the new world—a departure from what was then an impoverished country, and in the same year was already falling into the clutches of Imperial Japan. The reality that awaited these migrants was a life of indentured servitude in the Henequen plantations of Mexico, harvesting an agave that was then known as “the green gold” of Mexico. Many fled to Cuba with dreams of getting a foothold in the then lucrative sugar cane industry, though by the time they arrived the industry had already plummeted. Their homeland already a Japanese colony, they were again destined to hard labour in Cuban henequen plantations.  Argentinian-American-Korean photographer Michael Vince Kim pursued this story as a natural progression from his previous work focusing on language, identity and migration, entitling the series Aenikkaeng, (Korean for ‘Henequen’).

These Majestic Photos Capture a Disappearing Way of Life

In 2001, California-based photographer Oliver Klink embarked on a project to document the disappearing traditions and customs across Asia as modernization and cultural homogenization takes its toll. “When the Three George Dam was completed, the water level rose by over 100 meters (300 ft),” says Klink, and he saw the displacement of 1 million people from the edge of the Yangtze River. This proved to be just one example of how such communities are being affected by the change.

Visions of Iceland from a Remote Sheep Farm

In her remote corner of Iceland, photographer Marzena Skubatz makes her home in a sheep farm and weather station.

Portraits Depict Life In A Powerful New Zealand Gang

Casey Morton, a photographer based in New South Wales, Australia, wanted to document the contradictory existence of belonging to one of New Zealand’s most powerful gangs, the Black Power NZ. Formed in New Zealand by Maori and Polynesian men as a response to feeling marginalized in a colonized nation, they’re tough, live by their own creed, and are extremely exclusive.

A French Photographer Finds Magic in the Streets of China

French photographer Marilyn Mugot longs for dépaysement. The word doesn’t have a direct English translation; some dictionaries define it as “disorientation” or “a change in scenery,” but the artist describes it simply as “this feeling of being far away from home.” And she found it in China.

The Woman Who Wanted to Photograph Every House in Poland

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

© Zofia Rydet, from the series Sociological Record, Courtesy Foundation Zofia Rydet

Zofia Rydet mentioned in one of her letters that taking photos for her is like vodka to an alcoholic,” curator Sebastian Cichocki says of the 20th century photographer, “It’s like an addiction, so she collects more and more and more and she’s never satisfied.”

Animated Gifs Tell a Story of War and Hope on ‘Syria Street’

Abbas, Shopkeeper, Bab al-Tabbaneh

Nisrine’s family, Bab al-Tabbaneh

Hana Awad working, Bab al-Tabbaneh

“People get used to war,” photographer Brandon Tauszik says. Daily life doesn’t halt in the face of trauma; it persists in the background. It’s something photojournalists in Syria, like Nish Nalbandian and Ali Khara, have stressed over and over again. And it’s happening forty minutes from the boarder in Tripoli, where two neighborhoods remain locked in a shaky and precarious situation.

Tauszik embarked on the multi-media project Syria Street alongside the International Committee of the Red Cross, spending ten days on the thoroughfare that separates the mostly Sunni population of Bab al-Tabbaneh from the largely Alawite community of Jabal Mohsen.

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