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Photos Document a Dying Cheese-Making Tradition in the French Alps

First snow at Plan du Lac (2,385 m) and on the Grande Casse (3,855 m), September 2016

House and cheese-making workshop of the Bantin family, Chavière, September 2016

An appreciation of cheese might sound like a strange point of departure for a photo project, but sometimes it’s the ‘little’ things that really define our lived experiences. Annecy, France based photographer Nicolas Blandin was eating in a fancy restaurant in Annecy-le-Vieux in 2010 when he first tasted the Termignon blue cheese, a rare variety that is largely unknown in France.

“In the Park” with Diane Arbus

Diane Arbus
A young man and his girlfriend with hot dogs in the park, N.Y.C. 1971

During the late 1960s, a shift began to occur as New York City underwent the rapid effects of deindustrialization. As business left the city, a void took its place. But nature abhors a vacuum and new cultures began to emerge, one that could make something out of nothing at all.

As the counterculture took root, seeing possibility in the collapse of the middle class and the repeal of respectability politics that it used as overt measures of social control, a New York emerged from the fringe and found its way on to the city stage. The parks were the best place for those who did without, offering a place to socialize as well as to sleep.

For Diane Arbus, the park was the place where she could happen upon the most unlikely encounters with the most random of souls. She began photographing in Central Park in 1956, at the very beginning of her work as a serious artist. For the next fifteen years, she returned time and again to Central and Washington Square Parks for a fresh dose of the unexpected.

Edward Burtynsky’s Striking Images of India’s Salt Pans

Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky describes the terrain of the Little Rann of Kutch in Gujarat, India, as “scorched,” “cracked,” and “parched.” The Guardian’s Oliver Wainwright compares it to cat litter. Between October and June of every year, the Agariya people live along the salt pans, harvesting salt in temperatures so extreme they must work barefoot.

Portraits Revisit the New Romanticism Movement In the UK

Duggie Fields b.1945
The artist Duggie Fields is celebrated for his large- scale canvasses featuring bright blocks of colour and razor edged outlines. Gwinnutt photographed Fields in his Earls Court flat, in front of his painting Lakshmi, a tribute to the Hindu goddess of good fortune. Fields’s forelock of hair is neatly encased in the lines of his painting, a subtle detail that transforms the photograph into a play of shapes and tones, with a flatness that is characteristic of Fields’s work.

When Swinging London collapsed, the Pop-optics faded away. The bright cheerful colors of promise became muted, grubby, and grey as the city fell into created desperate times. The rising tide of unemployment, set against an on-going recession, brought the conservatives to fore, and through them a new leader was.

In 1979, Margaret Thatcher became the first woman to assume the mantle and she went hard: deregulating the financial sector, privatizing state-owned companies, and reducing the power of trade unions. She spoke for the elite and was largely unpopular until victory in the 1982 Falklands War.

During those intervening years, a new generation was coming of age, embracing the D.I.Y. ethos of punk and taking it far beyond the reaches of the known. The scene, which came to be known as the New Romantics, was centered at the Blitz, a nightclub in the Covent Garden section of London.

If ever there was a fitting name, it was this. At the Blitz, a fantastical coterie of artists, musicians, designers, filmmakers, and performers came dressed to kill, wearing handmade pieces that could best be described as Ziggy Stardust on acid. The Blitz Kids, as they were known, took that art of the poseur to the next level. The donned costumes and makeup that blurred gender lines, sometimes going so far as to erase the human element in the search for an identity that spoke to the moment.

British photographer David Gwinnutt was one of the creatures of the night, getting to know the curious and compelling personalities that sparkled under the strobe lights. He had taken up photography after discovering the work of Diane Arbus and Robert Mapplethorpe in the London studio of artist Brian Clarke. David Bailey was a frequent visitor, sharing stories and scandals that enticed.

After Years of Neglect, One Dog Becomes a Photographer’s Muse

Photographer Troy Moth has the life he always dreamt of as a teenager, and he shares it with his rescue dog. Together, he and Nikita the dog have traveled throughout the wilderness of the United States and Canada. They’ve run across the surface of frozen lakes in winter, ridden together in canoes, and trekked through mountains.

Photographers Turn Their Lens to the Refugee Crisis in Belgrade

Close to 75,000 refugees are still living in a state of limbo between the Balkans and Greece, unable to enter the EU due to reinforced border control. Their living conditions are often deplorable, their prospects bleak. “Around 1000 on these refugees are sleeping rough in abandoned warehouses, train wagons and shacks in the central station of Belgrade, the capital of Serbia” reveal Danish photographers Ulrik Hasemann and Mathias Svold, discussing the focus of their project The Lost Boys of Belgrade.

A Fascinating Portrait of the Working-Class in Northern England in the 1970s and 1980s


Father and Son Watching a Parade, West End, Newcastle; Chris Killip (British, born 1946); Newcastle, England; negative 1980; print 1986; Gelatin silver print

Helen and Her Hula-hoop, Seacoal Camp, Lynemouth, Northumberland; Chris Killip (British, born 1946); Lynemouth, Northumberland, United Kingdom; negative 1984; print 1985; Gelatin silver print

North England as presented by Manx photographer and Harvard professor Chris Killip is bleak not only for the lack of colour, but for the immediacy at which it hits the viewer that the subjects reside in a world where there are no prospects. Work, for those who work hard, is often intrinsically entangled with one’s identity. When an industry ceases to exist, for its former workers it’s literally like being lost in the fog that so often hangs like a weight behind the protagonists of Chris’ photographs.

Moments from Everyday Life at a School For The Blind in Calcutta

For his on-going photo project, The Sixth Sense, Calcutta-based photographer Sutirtha Chatterjee captures moments from the everyday lives of blind children at a school.

In India, almost three million people develop cataract each year, half the cases are curable, but are often left unattended and this leads to complete or partial blindness. There is also a major shortage of donated eyes in India owing to religious prejudices. Some believe that organ donations lead to deformities in the next birth. Any efforts to encourage eye donations must combat such superstitions and practices.

What Survival in an Apocalyptic Landscape Looks Like

A contractual labour inside one of the coal mines in Jharia. He will make two dollars after loading almost five trucks with coal in Jharia.

The symbol of Indian bureaucracy, the iconic white ambassador car waits inside one of the coal mines in Jharia. Whenever the coal thieves see this car coming, they run away from the mines.

“Jharia was once a green forest,” says Kolkata-based photographer Ronny Sen of the subject of his latest project, What Does the End of Time Look Like? But since the discovery of coal in the late 18th century, Jharia is no longer the green forest it once was.

By the turn of the century, the majority of India’s coal was mined in Jharia, which is located in the eastern state of Jharkand. “An underground fire has been burning ever since,’ says Sen, ‘but its presence is now overground – inside homes, temples and schools, in churches and mosques – places that were once thriving with life are now consumed by flames.”

Prison Inmates and the Dogs They Love, in Photos

In 2014, Travielle, an inmate at California State Prison Los Angeles County, sat down and wrote an application essay to Paws for Life, a program that would allow a small group of incarcerated men to work with homeless dogs inside the prison. “I understand what it’s like to be caged up,” Travielle wrote, “Paws for Life gives me the chance to give back, to do something for someone else, to give back to a society that I cheated.”

At the time Travielle was writing his essay, photographer John DuBois was on the other side of the Paws for Life initiative, volunteering at Karma Rescue, an organization that pulls dogs from crowded high-kill shelters and saves them from euthanasia.

When the Paws for Life program was introduced, the prison and the rescue invited DuBois and his partner Shaughn Crawford to document the first group of five dogs who were set to enter the prison. They spent six days with the men and their dogs, inside the Maximum Security facility.

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