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Photos Offer an Unflinching Look at Modern Russia

“We tolerate today for the sake of a good tomorrow,” Russian photographer Alexander Anufriev said when I asked him about the country he calls home, “but tomorrow never comes.”

Recreating London’s Iconic Reggae Record Covers, in Photos

Dandy Livingstone, Your Musical Doctor (Downtown, 1969), 46 years later

Various, Harder Shade of Black (Santic, 1974), 42 years later.

London photographer Alex Bartsch doesn’t know how many vinyl records are in his collection, but he has tracked down the exact spots where 42 of their covers were shot. He has biked all over the city, album covers in hand, stepping back in time and reconstructing a visual history of reggae from 1967 and 1987. Covers, now available for pre-order, is the result of his adventures.

Viviane Sassen’s New Photobook is Joyful and Tender (NSFW)

This summer will see the release of Roxane II, Viviane Sassen’s newest book, published by oodee. Following Roxane, her 2012 exploration of her relationship with her titular muse over several years, the new work continues to broaden Sassen’s poetic experimentation with colour and form, with her use of other media rising ever more prominently to the surface.

Petra Collins’s Intimate Photos of Friends and Family

“Anna and Anya (Hungary)” (2016)

“Anna and Kathleen (Rainbow)” (2016)

The meteoric rise of Toronto-born Petra Collins skyrocketed her from suburban teenager to international fashion photographer, artist, and feminist provocateur. Growing up in the suburbs of Toronto in the 2000s, Collins discovered photography at age 15, was introduced to VICE magazine while working at American Apparel, and sought mentorship by Richard Kern and Ryan McGinley. At 17, she founded The Ardorous, a female art collective providing a platform for emerging female artists. Now 24, Collins regularly shoots for high-end clients like Gucci Eyewear, Nordstrom, Stella McCartney, Calvin Klein, Levi, to name only a few, and has shot editorial for magazines such as Vogue, Purple Magazine, I-D Magazine, and Dazed and Confused. A prolific Instagrammer, Collins invites her over half-million followers on a seemingly personal journey. Her loose and natural photographic style grants viewers a voyeuristic look into a private world of youth, vulnerability, and explorations of female sexuality.

‘Ali the Greatest’ Photographed by Harry Benson, Thomas Hoepker, William Klein and Steve Schapiro

USA, Chicago, 1966. MUHAMMAD ALI, (formerly Cassius Clay), boxing world heavy weight champion in Chicago, Muhammad Ali on a bridge over the Chicago river. “The man with no imagination has no wings.” © Thomas Hoepker and Magnum Photos, ‘Muhammad Ali Jumping, Chicago’, 1966, Courtesy Atlas Gallery.

© Thomas Hoepker and Magnum Photos, ‘Ali Fist Sequence, Chicago’, 1966, Courtesy Atlas Gallery.

April 29, 2017, marked the 50th anniversary of the day Muhammad Ali was stripped of his World Heavyweight title and had his boxing license suspended for refusing to serve in the U.S. Armed Forces in order to fight in the war in Vietnam.

Ali issued a statement saying: “It is in the light of my consciousness as a Muslim minister and my own personal convictions that I take my stand in rejecting the call to be inducted. I do so with the full realization of its implications. I have searched my conscience. I had the world heavyweight title not because it was given to me, not because of my race or religion, but because I won it in the ring. Those who want to take it and start a series of auction-type bouts not only do me a disservice, but actually disgrace themselves… Sports fans and fair-minded people throughout America would never accept such a title-holder.” 

This Photography Program Empowers Kids Living with Cancer

Red and Blue Steps, 2017 © Aralyn Lopez, age 6

Ascending into the Night, 2016 © Joshua Randman, age 18

In 2008 and 2009, as he was going through cancer treatment, a boy named Pablo took tons of photographs: self-portraits in the mirror, portraits of his dogs, and still lifes of his toys, arranged in particular ways for the camera. “We didn’t realize was how important that form of self-expression was for him while he was in treatment,” Pablo’s mother, Jo Ann Thrailkill, told me over the phone. Pablo passed away in June 2009, thirteen months after he was diagnosed with a rare form of childhood cancer. “But he left us these incredible gifts,” Thrailkill explained, referring to the photos saved on all their phones and computers.

The Trauma of Life on Skid Row, in Photos

Genevine and Jennifer

Old Roses

Little Cat, Skid Row

Los Angeles photographer Suzanne Stein recently posted a picture of a badly abused, sick cat from Skid Row on her Instagram feed.

In my mind, it’s a photograph that could not have been made by anyone but Stein. She has been photographing life on Skid Row since the fall of 2015, and in the last year, she has borne witness to the acute suffering of others. She’s heard firsthand from survivors of rape and abuse. She’s befriended people who are addicted to heroin. She’s been in the presence of infections and illness, true life and death situations. And throughout all of it, a fundamental decency and humanity have remained at the heart of all her images. 

Berenice Abbott: Paris Portraits 1925-1930

André Salmon (French, 1881-1969) &
Pierre Charbonnier (French, 1897-1978)

Mme. Guerin with Bulldog (French)

Paris, 1925: Berenice Abbott stood on the balcony of Man Ray’s Paris studio with his camera in her hands, taking photographs that would become the very first portraits in a long and legendary career.

Four years earlier, she arrived in Paris at the age of 23. Within two years, she was working as a darkroom assistant to her friend Man Ray. With his encouragement she stepped into the light and began producing work of her own. A selection of 115 works from this period now appear in the luxurious tome, Berenice Abbott: Paris Portraits 1925-1930 (Steidl), giving us an unfettered glimpse into the early years of a natural.

Martha Cooper: Five Decades of Street Art and Culture Around the Globe

Christopher Sawyer breaking, Upper West Side, NYC, 1983

Couple with big boom box, Manhattan, NYC, 1983

Woman with white pants on 180th Street platform, Bronx, NYC, 1980

Photographer Martha Cooper has always lived life on her own term. After graduating high school at 16 and Grinnell College at 19, the Baltimore-native decided to see the world so she joined the Peace Corps and traveled to Thailand, where she taught English for a spell. Then she hopped on a motorcycle and hightailed it from Bangkok to London, taking all along the way.

She received a diploma in anthropology from Oxford, which speaks to her truest sensibilities: her passion for documenting the creative fruits of the human experience. In her hands, the camera is not merely a tool to create an image for aesthetic pleasure, it does something more; it bears witness to a time and place that is inherently ephemeral: street art and culture, which is inherently urban folk art.

Powerful Photos of the Heavy Metal Queens of Botswana

Florah Dylon-Son Younggal Bison

Millie Hans, a woman in Botswana, had just gotten home from work. She cooked dinner for her children, changed into her leather pants, and rocked out to the Battle Hymn by Manowar, a heavy metal song with lyrics like “Gone are the days, when freedom shone – now blood and steel meet bone.” This is the moment South African photographer Paul Shiakallis remembers most from his time photographing the female members of the Marok community, Botswana’s metalhead subculture. “We sang together like it was a church service,” he remembers.

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