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Call for Submissions: Photos of Snow (Sponsored)

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The Cairngorms of Scotland © Ruairidh McGlynn (@ruairidhmcglynn)

In 1885, a 19-year-old Vermont farmer named Wilson A. Bentley took what are generally considered to be the first photographs of snowflakes ever made. Since then, photographers around the world have been capturing snow, whether it be for scientific or artistic purposes. A winter scene can be serene or frightening, depending on who’s behind the lens, and for our next group show, we’re inviting you to submit your photographs of snow.

This online group show will be curated by Alison Zavos, Editor-in-Chief at Feature Shoot. To submit, email up to five images (620 pixels wide on the shortest side, saved for web, no borders or watermarks) titled with your name and the number of the image (ex: yourname_01.jpg) to fsgroupshow (at) gmail (dot) com with “Snow” in the subject line. Please include your full name, website and image captions within the body of the email.

You may also submit via Instagram simply by following @featureshoot and posting your images using the hashtag #featureshootsnow. Selected images will be featured on our Instagram throughout the duration of the judging process.

This show is supported by Squarespace, the intuitive website publishing platform that makes it simple for photographers to build creative and professional sites with their combo of award-winning designs, hosting, domains, and commerce. Selected photos will run on the Feature Shoot website and be promoted through our social media channels. Copyright remains with the photographer.

The deadline for submissions is December 20th, 2016.

Squarespace is a Feature Shoot sponsor.

Photos of the Darkness Inside a Child’s Imagination

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When you’re little, most everything is frightening, especially the darkness and whatever might lurk therein. As an adult, photographer Stavros Stamatiou stepped back into the abyss of his childhood memories, wandering alone in the night throughout the ancient Grecian land beside his home.

Exposing the Shantytowns of America’s Homeless

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Eddy and the New Guy
MIAMI, FLORIDA / JULIA TUTTLE CAUSEWAY, BOOKVILLE, PAROLED SEX OFFENDER CAMP. In Miami, Florida laws were passed making it impossible for paroled sex offenders to move home with their families. They were required to wear leg monitors and sleep under a bridge each night or they would violate their parole. Released convicts were dropped off at the encampment without so much as a sleeping bag. Older residents like Eddy on the right would sometimes help out the new arrivals. Eddy has a three room wooden shanty that includes a bathroom with a toilet that flushes into the bay.

Structure out of Chaos: Shantytowns of America's Homeless
Carol and Molly’s Van
NEW ORLEANS, LOUISIANA / RESCUE MISSION CAMP Carol lived in a van with her dog Molly. She drove to New Orleans from Iowa with the hope of a milder winter. The vehicle was full of her belongings and there was no space to sleep unless she removed her valuables.. Her days were spent in a small cramped area at the steering wheel. When the temperature dropped below freezing she refused to go to a shelter because dogs were not welcome there.

Structure out of Chaos is the name given to New Orleans-based photographer Mary Lou Uttermohlen’s ongoing documentary project observing homeless people in the United States, who organize their lives by building shantytowns. As authorities strive to wipe away these communities, police conduct regular sweeps which plunge residents back into chaos. While this vicious cycle continues, Uttermohlen aims with her project to open an informed dialogue on the issues of chronic homelessness in the US and beyond.

The Ongoing Cost of the Chernobyl Disaster

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Olia and Ania during their inpatient treatment in the Pediatric Clinic of Neurosurgery in Kiev. The 14-year-old Olia is affected by an osteosarcoma, the most common form of primary bone cancer. In this moment she films her same age guitar playing friend, which is hospitalized because of thyroid and ovarian cancer.

National Institute of Cancer at the Pediatric Clinic of Neurosurgery, in cooperation with the Zaporuka NGO, Kiev, 2015.

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A fox roams the streets of Pripyat.
After the nuclear disaster, which spread hundreds of thousands of tons of radioactive material into the air, many people assumed that the area around Chernobyl would remain for a long time a dead zone. But meanwhile not only dense forest grows rampantly here. There have also been observed animals, which otherwise in many parts of Europe are still hard to find. Besides wolves, foxes, wild boars or deer also elks and lynxes and even bears inhabit the area in which the radioactivity according to researches is still increased by ten to one hundred times.

Pripyat, Chernobyl Exclusion Zone, 2015.

“You are facing the end of humanity.” Pierpaolo Mittica is describing his emotional reaction each time he returns to Chernobyl to work on his project, Chernobyl 30 Years After. He has visited the Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (an area designated to control and limit the spread of radioactive fallout since the disaster) more than 15 times since 2002, and has been working on this particular photographic project since 2014. “Every time I go to Chernobyl it is a new experience. The feelings and the emotional level are very high, because a nuclear accident is the end of everything.”

The Frontline at Standing Rock, in Photos

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Water Protector at the front lines

Water Protector stands before a large group of armed police

On Monday, November 21st, 2016, photographer Avery Leigh White was struck with a rubber bullet and tear gas as police fired at the Water Protectors of the Standing Rock Reservation in Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Her hair was frozen after being drenched by a water cannon. She was unable to see, breathe, or use her hands.

A Beautifully Honest Portrayal of Post Natal Depression

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In Sour Milk, Farah Hughes explores the subject of Post Natal Depression (PND). Such emotionally isolating illnesses are often hard to put into words, and Hughes renders the condition visually through sensitive portraits of women who have experienced it, at times photographed with their children, and at others alone. Describing her own experience with PND as “one of the hardest battles [she has] had to fight”, Hughes is intimately acquainted with the subject of her project.

These ‘Shop Cats’ In Hong Kong Will Make You Smile

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© Marcel Heijnen, ‘Hong Kong Shop Cats’ #5, Hong Kong 2016, Courtesy Blue Lotus Gallery, Hong Kong

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© Marcel Heijnen, ‘Hong Kong Shop Cats’ #18, Hong Kong 2016, Courtesy Blue Lotus Gallery, Hong Kong

After decades of living with cats, Dutch photographer Marcel Heijnen found himself in Hong Kong without one to call his own. Then he met Dau Ding. And Ah Dai, and Siu Faa, and Fei Zai, the shop cats of the Sai Ying Pun and Sheung Wan neighborhoods.

Hunting Culture Revealed in Honest and Unflinching Photos

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The Hungry Moon © Andrea Tese

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Bone Saw © Jesse Burke

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Hermannstadt I © Michael Tummings

Take Aim, a photographic exhibition exploring hunting culture, isn’t meant to be comfortable. For curator William LeGoullon, who is neither for nor against hunting, it’s a study in contradictions.

Color and Light in a Unique Suburb of Sydney

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Sydney-born photographer Markus Andersen first visited the suburb of Cabramatta two years ago. A memorial had recently been set up in the main square honor of those who lost their lives in the 2014 Sydney hostage crisis, and moved by the scene, the photographer found himself wandering the streets.

Empathetic Portraits of Juvenile Offenders in Poland

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Adrian and Andrzej

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Dominik

Imago, to those unfamiliar with the entomological term, means the final stage of development in the metamorphosis from larvae or chrysalis to fully formed insect. In this state, it has gained its adult form and is sexually mature, but still has some prolonged maturation and growth to complete. If we look at the photography series of the same name by Zuza Krajewska, this term takes on a poignant new meaning as a metaphor for that transitional phase between childhood and adulthood. The artist portrays juvenile offenders, too young for incarceration yet old enough to commit a crime, residing in the Studzieniech borstal, a Polish youth custody centre.

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