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Call for Entries: The RPS International Photography Exhibition

Rose in a Fox Mask © Melanie Eclare

Abrigo Corner 1 © Tom Blachford

The International Photography Exhibition by The Royal Photographic Society has been a fixture of the photography community since 1854, just fifteen years after the invention and introduction of practical photography. Now in it’s 160th year, the IPE is the single longest-running photography competition of its kind, allowing contemporary photographers to follow in the footsteps of early exhibitors like Julia Margaret Cameron, Edward Steichen, and Roger Fenton.

For this year’s worldwide call for submissions, the RPS has once again opened its doors to photographers of all backgrounds, working in all genres. As always, there is no fixed theme, making IPE one of the most consistently diverse photography exhibitions in the world.

The all-star jury— composed of curators Karin Bareman and Zelda Cheatle, along with photographers Sian Davey, Ingrid Pollard, and Abbie Trayler-Smith— will look for work that is engaging, striking, inspiring, and innovative.

In addition to the coveted cash prizes and awards, the final winners, selected from a pool of shortlisted photographers, will participate in the annual nationwide tour, starting with PHOTOBLOCK at Old Truman Brewery in London and moving to educational institutions and galleries across the United Kingdom.

PHOTOBLOCK is an annual weeklong event, connecting industry leaders every October as part of Photomonth, the prestigious photography festival in East London. Exhibitors at PHOTOBLOCK include the Royal Photographic Society, British Press Photographers’ Association, the Association of Photographers Awards, and more.

Winners will have their work published in the historic and award-winning RPS Journal and will also be featured in the exhibition catalog. Four winning photographers will be exhibited at theprintspace gallery in London, and photographers under the age of 30 will be eligible for an additional “under 30” award.

Apply by May 24th, 2017, to have your work considered for The International Photography Exhibition 160. You may submit up to four images. Members of The Royal Photographic Society pay £20 per submission; non-members pay £30, and photographers under 30 pay £15. Learn more here.

The Jungola Klownz of Deptford © Poem Baker

Hattver © Ross Brown

A Polaroid for a Refugee © Giovanna del Sarto

Abandoned Car © Greg Kahn

Alice © Carolyn Mendelsohn

School Bus © Anna Shustikova

The Red Sanctuary © Yoong Wah Alex Wong

Tomas and Lorenco © Peter Zelewski

Brutality in the illegal clinics that claim to ‘cure’ homosexuality in Ecuador

“Four years ago a friend told me about these clinics that try to convert gay people and transexuals, and at that time I hadn’t come out to my parents” says Ecuadorian photographer Paola Paredes discussing her latest series Until You Change, “This is not just happening in Ecuador, it’s a global issue. It happens in Mexico, Colombia, even in Europe and the US. Naturally I imagined that this could happen to me too”.

The Iconic 1940s Photographer Who Never Wanted to Be Famous

“LaSalle at Amsterdam” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

“125th Street” 1946 © Todd Webb Archive, Portland, Maine USA

The photographs arrived at The Curator Gallery in a box meant for curator Bill Shapiro, the former editor of Life magazine. When he saw the first few pictures, the curator wondered if he could possibly be looking at the work of a Life photographer he didn’t recognize. He had never heard of the man behind the hundred-some images inside the box.

As it turned out, the package had been left for him by Betsy Evans, a friend of the late photographer Todd Webb, who left behind an extensive archive. Though the elusive photographer had never been at Life, Webb shared a time, a place, and a sensibility with those who had. He was friends with Life staffer Gordon Parks. He also worked and played alongside Walker Evans, Ansel Adams, Lisette Model, Berenice Abbott, and Alfred Stieglitz and Georgia O’Keeffe.

This New Book for Photographers is Full of Ideas to Unlock Creativity

Up & Away, 2011

A Mad Tea Party with Alice, 2011

“For better or worse, you can’t simply start being an artist when work begins, and then stop being one when work is over,” photographer Claire Rosen writes in her new book, “You are an artist all the time.”

IMAGINARIUM: The Process Behind the Pictures is a book for creative people who dare to step out of their comfort zones, dig deep, and pull something beautiful out of the murky abyss of their own minds. Rosen’s own photographs— made from her dreams, her memories, and old stories— illustrate the guide, taking us through the steps of finding, brainstorming, executing, and editing ideas.

40 Subversive Female Photographers Who Capture Women in a New Way

Lulu, Ali and Sofy, Long Island, 2015 © Mayan Toledano

Zinzi and Tozama II Mowbray, 2010 © Zanele Muholi

Untitled #23 (Selfie), 2013-16 © Petra Collins

In 1975, feminist film critic Laura Mulvey coined the phrase “the male gaze.” For centuries, the default audience in art and media has been assumed to be both male and heterosexual. 1972, John Berger supported that idea, writing, “Men look at women. Women watch themselves being looked at.” More than 40 years later, the tides are finally changing.

Critics, curators, and scholars have a new phrase now: The Female Gaze. Writer Charlotte Jansen is one of them, and her new book Girl on Girl: Art and Photography in the Age of the Female Gaze is an in-depth exploration of the phenomenon, as seen through the eyes of 40 contemporary artists, working across 17 countries worldwide.

A sneak peek at the World Press Photo YearBook 2017

Sarah Barrs lies over her horse’s back, in October 2013. From the series Table Rock Nebraska © Markus Jokela, Helsingin Sanomat

People carry an American and a Mohawk Warrior Society flag at a protest camp against the Dakota Access Pipeline, in Cannon Ball, North Dakota, USA. From the series Standing Rock © Amber Bracken

The World Press Photo Foundation has been running its annual photo contest since 1955, and in this time has become internationally renowned for the quality of its winning entrants.

As is so often the case with World Press Photo Awards, this year’s competition was not without its controversies.

There’s little doubt that the photograph of the year picturing the assassin standing over the Russian ambassador to Turkey, taken by Burhan Özbilici, is impactful—chairman Stuart Franklin however openly divulged his opposition to the photograph for its role in publicising a murder scene.

One Photographer’s Fight for the Hudson River in New York

“This is our Standing Rock,” photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood says of the Hudson River.

Martin the Talking Dog Will Make You Laugh and Cry

People might take things for granted, but dogs don’t. At least that’s how director Michael Killen sees it. Downward Dog is the story of a dog named Martin and his person, a young woman named Nan.

Photos of the Last Remaining American Drive-In Theaters

Frontier Drive-In, Center, Colorado. Abandoned
“The Frontier Drive-In was possibly my favorite location that in hindsight I wish I had given more time to. As we drove down this long highway surrounded by nothing, we were heading straight towards the biggest rain cloud I have ever seen. As soon as we had the theatre in our sights, the torrential rain started. My assistant and I sat in the car for nearly an hour, until finally we got a 10-minute break in the rain.”

East Hartford Drive-In, South Windsor, Connecticut. Abandoned
“The shoot at East Hartford was very special because I got to create a photograph that had been in my head since the beginning of this project. I found a model who also had an amazing vintage car he was willing to drive back into the unmaintained lot. Of course it started to rain as soon as we arrived, so I had to work quickly, but we were able to create one of my favorite images from the trip.”

In the summer of 2014, Portland photographer Lindsey Rickert packed up her life and hit the road in search of drive-in movie theaters around the county. Some had been closed and deserted; others had adapted to a swiftly-changing market and were still in business. In total, she spent over two months in her car, traversing an estimated 12,022 miles across the United States.

Magical Photos from the World’s Surviving Tribes

Suri Girl with Orchid Wreath, Ethiopia

Sisters Meal Festival Dancer in Guizhou, China

Photographer Terri Gold says she wants to find “the grace notes” of humanity. She has vivid memories of spinning an old-fashioned globe as a child, and as an adult, she dreams of faraway places and the secrets they keep hidden.

Gold has devoted much of her life to visiting the Indigenous tribal communities of our planet. The longterm project Still Points in a Turning World has taken her to Namibia, Ethiopia, Kenya, Niger, India, and China. She’s camped under the desert skies with the Wodaabe nomads, and she’s watched the sunrise over the villages of the Omo Valley, where people paint their bodies and adorn themselves with plants and shells and bones. She has driven through the hairpin turns of the mountains of Guizhou, a landscape etched with 2000-year-old rice terraces.

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