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Beautiful, Life-Affirming Photos of Elderly Dogs

Chauncey 12yrs - Juneau

Chauncey (middle), 12 years old, daughter Sailor Girl (left) and Ready girl (right), 6 years old, Juneau, Alaska

49_A Meg 16 years old Java 14.5 years old Juneau, Alaska

Meg ,16 years old, Java, 14.5 years old, Juneau, Alaska

In 2006, New York City-based photographer Nancy LeVine said goodbye to her two best friends, dogs Lulu and Maxie. She has devoted more than a decade to honoring their legacy, traveling the United States in search of souls like theirs, elderly canines who are living out their golden years with a dignity and warmth that far exceed the aches and pains of old age.

Call for Submissions: The Art of Food

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At the Cai Rang floating market in Vietnam, vendors arrive early in the morning to hang their vegetables for display © Daniel Dreifuss (@punkeykid, @illuminatethisday)

Marcella Hazan, the recently departed Italian food writer, famously said, “Cooking is an art, but you eat it too.” In recent years, photography and food have collided in a big way, from famous photographers who have taken the unlikely route of shooting cookbooks to others who have used food to build full-blown gallery installations. Now, we’re looking for your images capturing the intersection of art and food, whatever that means to you, from food photographed artfully to art made out of food.

This group show will be curated by Alison Zavos, Editor-in-Chief at Feature Shoot. To submit, email up to five images (620 pixels wide on the shortest side, saved for web, no borders or watermarks) titled with your name and the number of the image (ex: yourname_01.jpg) to fsgroupshow (at) gmail (dot) com with “Art of Food” in the subject line. Please include your full name, website and image captions within the body of the email.

You may also submit via Instagram simply by following @featureshoot and posting your images using the hashtag #featureshootfood. Submissions are already rolling in, so act now for the chance to have your image featured on our Instagram.

This show is supported by Squarespace, the intuitive website publishing platform that makes it simple for photographers to build creative and professional sites with their combo of award-winning designs, hosting, domains, and commerce. Selected photos will run on the Feature Shoot website and be promoted through our social media channels. Copyright remains with the photographer.

Deadline for submissions is July 16, 2016.

Squarespace is a Feature Shoot sponsor.

Photos Capture the Side-by-Side Transitions of a Couple in Love

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Relationship, #23 (The Longest Day of the Year), 2011

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Relationship, #33, 2008-2013

There’s a photo on Myspace from 2005, picturing a party in Manhattan. In the crowd, two strangers are dancing. Three years later, those anonymous people would meet and fall in love. From 2008 until 2014, Zackary Drucker and Rhys Ernst took hundreds more photographs of one another, not as part of a noisy group, but together in the privacy of their own home. Over the course of that time, Drucker, a transgender woman, and Ernst, a transgender man, would transition, side-by-side.

Incredible Stories and Photos from Countries on the US Travel Warnings List (Sponsored)

Documentary travel photography from North Korea.

Two children walking along an empty street in Pyongyang © Aaron Joel Santos / Offset

Aaron Joel Santos: There’s something almost upsettingly benign about traveling in North Korea. It feels set up, like a stage in some very elaborate school play. The costumes and actors and lines and directions are all there, laid out for the people you come across. It’s a Ghost World, there through the fog of a window pane. Hidden behind several layers so you can barely make out what it is you’re looking at. It’s mysterious, of course, but it also plays into its own mysteries perfectly.

It’s almost as if, at times, it knows what travelers want out of it, and it obliges. It’s a strange place, and maybe all the more so because we can’t seem to get a grasp on it. It’s a slippery country. At times brutal and frightening and utterly evil, and in other instances, almost hokey and kitsch. But always with a kind of looming terror. Which is why I photographed it the way I did. Lost in that fog. Trying to depict this idea of ghosts haunting a city. A certain myopia and strangeness, something that couldn’t be quite seen or grasped or believed.

The United States government has a list, updated frequently to include all travel warnings to civilians, advising them on precarious situations in locations around the world. Some countries stay on the list for the blink of an eye; others remain for years. While the government cannot of course forbid us from visiting these countries, the list uses no uncertain terms: “We want you to know the risks of traveling to these places and to strongly consider not going to them at all.”

As of this writing, there are thirty-seven places on the Travel Warnings List. Reasons for issuing a warning range from civil war to limited protection by the US government. The Mali warning makes mention of recent terrorist attacks and criminal activity, and some of the remote areas of Algeria are also listed for potential terrorism and kidnappings.

The Iran Travel Warning cites religious tensions, unfair arrests, and “various elements in Iran that remain hostile to the United States.” Americans are warned against visiting parts of Tunisia along the border with Libya due to fear of terrorism. According to the list, North Korea poses a “serious risk of arrest and long-term detention under North Korea’s system of law enforcement, which imposes unduly harsh sentences, including for actions that in the United States would not be considered crimes.”

Although the government is quick to point out that “tens of thousands of U.S. citizens safely visit Colombia each year for tourism, business, university studies, and volunteer work,” it still makes the list because of crime-related violence. Armed robberies are mentioned in association with Venezuela.

Every one of these countries has a history that goes well beyond a number on the list. We wanted to ask some of our favorite Offset photographers who have spent time in these places to tell us their stories, candid tales about personal experiences. Their memories are their own and no one else’s, and they should by no means be understood to represent something general or universal, but they do illuminate sides of these countries that otherwise would remain invisible.

Yes, some of these stories are scary, but others are breathtakingly beautiful. None are what we expected.

Exploring Ecuador and Mexico Off the Grid

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Chetumal, Quintana Roo, Mexico

Valle del Chotas, Ecuador ,

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Three years ago, Montreal-based photographer Benoit Paillé left everything behind, fitting his entire life inside a 21-foot camper. He’s anchored to nothing and free to explore; he mets strangers along the way, says goodbye, and moves along. Traversing the streets and landscapes of Mexico and Ecuador, he creates uncanny visions of daily life, scenes in which the mundane goings on become electric rituals and rites, thrumming with color.

The 13-Year-Old Pageant Girl Who’s Challenging Racism in Brazil

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Luana, Maysa’s sister, decided she also wants be a model.

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Sunday morning, after buying bread for breakfast.

Maysa is proud of her skin, her beauty, her african hair,” says Brazilian photographer Luisa Dorr of her thirteen-year-old muse and close friend, whom she has documented for the last two years. The photographer remembers vividly meeting the girl, then eleven, at Palacio do Cedro during the Young Miss Brazil pageant. She wore a green dress and dreamt someday of being in the competition herself.

19 Fine Art Photographers Describe Their Daily Routines

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© Andi Schreiber

Andi Schreiber: I crave routine in terms of my art making but it’s impossible to achieve. I’m a full-time parent so I try to get my work done when my kids are out of the house or at school. While it would seem that the hours are endless, the days go by fast, usually emptied by various household responsibilities. My fine art routine has adjusted to fit into these other obligations, like by taking my camera along to my children’s dental checkups or having it on hand when I’m spending an afternoon on the sidelines. I’m also good about uploading to my computer regularly, selecting my images in Photo Mechanic and then processing in Lightroom. The better images get exported as tiffs while the rest are exported as jpegs. Then I do some tweaking in Photoshop and the keepers get placed into folders for various projects. I have a blog that I use to share my new work but I’m not posting as often these days. Now it seems that that my photographs need more time to marinate before I’m ready to share them publicly. Maybe blogs are so 2010 but I still find mine to be a useful place for thinking about my work and my process.

Bruce Gilden: I get up early. I go to sleep early.

Diana Markosian: Doesn’t matter where I am, which home I am in, or what hotel I am staying in, I am fairly structured with my day. I wake up around 5 am, shoot for the first two hours (if I am on assignment), then go home and make breakfast — usually oatmeal and coffee. Then I work through the morning as late as I can before going to the gym. The morning is my most productive time, so I try to prolong it. I spend the afternoons/evenings in the field, working on my story. I come home late. Edit. Afterwards, I usually read for a while and then go to bed around midnight.

This Transgender Man Steals the Show in New Period Underwear Ad

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Suddenly, periods are in vogue. What was taboo two years ago is now openly discussed; feminine hygiene products are getting better and they’re being shared more widely with women in developing countries where the stigma is pervasive. Chances are you’ve heard about Thinx period panties, an alternative to pads, tampons, and menstrual cups. The press coverage has been tremendous; journalists have sampled different styles; celebrities have endorses the brand. Thanks in part to Thinx, having your period is no longer shameful; it’s cool.

Candid Photos of ‘Desktop Dining’ in the American Workplace

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Michael Brennan, Managing director in high-yield bond sales, Citigroup, New York. Pizza and chicken soup.

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Monica Vaccari, Community manager of social media, Audible, Newark. Chicken-and-andouille soup; beignets for dessert.

“The way people eat at work is pretty sad,” the disillusioned ethnographer June Jo Lee told journalist Malia Wollan of The New York Times Magazine. For the story Failure to Lunch: The lamentable rise of desktop dining, the magazine teamed up with New York City-based photographer Brian Finke to conduct a survey of the state of munching in American offices.

Breathtaking Images of Syria Before the Civil War (Sponsored)

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Azm Palace in Hama © Lisa Limer / Offset

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A rural village © Lisa Limer / Offset

In the spring of 2001, Rhode Island-based photographer Lisa Limer traveled to Syria on assignment for a leading travel magazine. When the photographs were, as she puts it, “at the printers, ready to run,” the story was abruptly shut down, and her breathtaking photographs of Syria were not published.

Looking back on the images she took in Syria, Limer can’t help but feel the ache of all that’s been lost in the last fifteen years and in the wake of civil war. “I know now that most everything that I photographed has been destroyed,” she admits, her mind whirling back fifteen years. She walked through Damascus and Aleppo, captured Homs before it was all but razed to the ground.

In 2015, close to the anniversary of her visit, the ancient city of Palmyra, which holds treasures dating back to centuries before the Common Era and was once held by the Roman Empire, was seised by the Islamic State of Iraq and the Levant. In the intervening year, ISIL would execute its prisoners at the ancient Roman Theatre at Palmyra; the 82-year-old archeologist Khaled al-Asaad would be interrogated regarding the locations of the site’s antiquities, and he would die safeguarding the information.

The Azm Palace, built during the Ottoman Empire, the Umayyad Mosque, considered one of the most holy sites in the world, and The Church of Saint Simeon Stylites, the single oldest remaining Byzantine church, still stand.

When asked if she felt nervous flying to Syria so many moons before the Civil War, Limer says simply, “I had no apprehension.” She trusted her own footing there, and although she made sure to dress according to the country’s conservative status quo—she was, in her words, “certainly aware of her womanhood”—Limer suggests that her gender was also an asset, allowing her to approach and photograph local women as they made their way throughout the cities.

Still, the photographer felt the tremors of a country in pain. “Even in 2001, you felt the sadness,” she explains, adding “In all my travels, I had never left a country feeling more depressed.” With a government guide watching over ever move she made, she witnessed the aftermath of conflicts and failed uprisings; her eyes lingered over “bullet holes and burnt out buildings.”

Limer reflects on her 2001 trip to Syria with melancholy and an inescapable longing for something that left many years ago: “This trip could now never be repeated. Regrettably, it is what makes this experience unforgettable.”

Limer’s work from Syria is represented by Offset.

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