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Posts tagged: sports photography

Legendary Sports Photographer Walter Iooss Teams Up With Your Art Gallery (Sponsored)

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Rare Air, Coconut Grove 1993 © Walter Iooss

Walter Iooss_Blue Dunk, Lisle, Ill. 1987

Blue Dunk, Lisle, Ill 1987 © Walter Iooss

Michael Jordan. Derek Jeter. Muhammed Ali. Name a handful of the great athletes of the 20th and 21st centuries, and Walter Iooss has probably photographed them all. The picture that springs to mind when you think of a “sports star” is probably a picture he’s shot. He’s the guy who’s immortalized legends on the covers of more than 300 issues of Sports Illustrated.

Of all his iconic photographs, Iooss’s greatest are arguably those he made with Michael Jordan in his heyday— and probably the most memorable decade of the NBA. The pair collaborated to produce the smash hit autobiography Rare Air in 1993, topping the charts and taking the world by storm. He captured the evolution of an young man who became a star, right up until the first time he retired from the Chicago Bulls that same year.

Now, nearly a quarter century later, Iooss is celebrating another milestone. He has partnered with Your Art Gallery to release limited edition signed archival pigment prints for art buyers (and sports fans) around the world. And yes, that world-famous portrait of MJ in the white hoodie is included among the selection of 30 artworks. Most are familiar; some are surprises; all tell a story of hard work, heartache, triumph, and the indelible bond between a great photographer and his muse.

A Wistful Look at Rockaway Beach Before Hurricane Sandy

Kui, February Swell 2005

Kui, February Swell 2005

Kristi Convalescing, 2005

Kristi Convalescing, 2005

In Queens, New York, the Rockaway Beach surfers aren’t deterred by freezing temperatures; come rain or come snow, they inherit the waves. From 2004 to 2011, photographer Susannah Ray documented her people as the braved the treacherous waters of the Atlantic.

Right Coast, her most recent monograph coinciding with an exhibition at The Rockaway Beach Surf Club until August 9th, is her homage to the surf community. The word “right” of course contains two meanings, referring both to a place on the map as well as the loyalty and pride that runs across its shores.

The Most Incredible Underwater Photos Taken off An Island in The Philippines (Sponsored)

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© Karl Lundholm / Offset

Beneath the surface

© Karl Lundholm / Offset

It all started with a Google search: “the best surf in The Philippines.” Having just come off the high of shooting waves in Australia, Swedish photographer and Offset artist Karl Lundholm wanted to make one last stop on his way home. One place kept coming up in his search, and the more he learned, the more he yearned to visit the island of Siargao.

LG Takes Us Behind-the-Scenes with YouTube Sensation Devin Super Tramp (Sponsored)

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At the time of this writing, Devin Graham of Devin Super Tramp has 779,244,531 views on YouTube and an astonishing 4,118,120 subscribers, but before he was a celebrity filmmaker, he was a kid making music videos with his siblings. Throughout his career, he’s kept that same childlike sense of adventure and wonder; he’s documented athletes who, inspired by the video game Assassin’s Creed, have developed insane parkour skills, jumping from one rooftop to the next in costume. He’s captured bike parkour and extreme pogo freestyle, which yes, incorporates the pogo stick, beloved by children worldwide. Graham hasn’t lost the playfulness and enthusiasm of his childhood; the only thing that’s changed is his equipment, and he’s upgraded big time with an LG UltraWide® 21:9 monitor.

Adrenaline Junkies and the Rise of ‘Adventure Tourism’ (Sponsored)

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Surfing on The Eisbach river, Munich © Alberto Bernasconi / Offset

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BASE Jumping in Moab, Utah © Gabe Rogel / Aurora Photos / Offset

When we think of “vacationing” as a verb, our minds go to white sand beaches and days spent languidly basking in the sunshine, but over the past five years, a new trend has the tourism industry by storm. Cruises are out of vogue; base jumping, spelunking, and deep sea diving are in.

“Adventure travel” took off full force in 2009, and four years later, the marked departure from the typical family holiday caught the attentions of The George Washington University and prompted the 2013 Adventure Tourism Market Study. According to their research, the industry of adventure travel, which includes scheduled activities like extreme sporting and outdoor exploration, has grown at a rate of about 65% each year. This year, travelers are hungrier than ever for new, uncharted destinations and adrenaline-pumping experiences.

Just a decade ago, traveling to remote locations to participate in risky, physically taxing activities like free-diving, mountain climbing, or parachute jumping was the sole territory of daredevils and backpackers. The increased yearning for overseas adventure comes mostly from the younger generation, those who are waiting longer to get married and have kids, those who are devoting more time to exploring and finding themselves by experiencing different cultures firsthand. What was once alternative has become mainstream.

Now that people are more aware of the importance of sustainability and conservation, resorts and lodges have taken into consideration the ecosystems of some of the world’s most precious areas, and instead of wiping away local traditions, they’re starting to embrace the value of learning from others. In honor of the summer season, we’ve pulled together some of the most astounding extreme travel photographs we could find, all sourced from Offset’s collection of high-end editorial and commercial imagery.

Beyond the Olympics and Carnival, Photos Take You to the Real Brazil (Sponsored)

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The town of Ouro Preto and Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church in the Mina Gerais State in Brazil © Yadid Levy / Offset

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People line up wearing animal masks in Northeast Bahia © Gabriel Boieras / SambaPhoto / Offset

The cultural diversity of Brazil, cultivated over 500 years of recorded history, has given rise to some of the most distinctive travel experiences in the world, from the five days of elaborate parade floats, cross-dressers, stolen kisses, and laughter that fills the streets during Carnival to the sleepy days spent sunbathing on 5,000 miles white sand beaches.

Only in Rio de Janeiro can you sip frozen drinks made with açaí berries fresh from the Amazon, join the locals playing footvolley–a cross between beach volleyball and soccer– between dips in the surf, or listen to the percussive music flowing from the spontaneous Samba circles that crop up throughout the Lapa neighborhood.

In honor of the upcoming 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, we’ve selected some of our favorite images from Brazil, all curated from the remarkable Offset collection. These photographs capture the flavors Bahia, where seafood stew is cooked in a clay pot and served fragrant and spicy, and the colorful facades of old, colonial houses that line the oldest, most well-trodden streets of Salvador.

Rio de Janeiro’s Sports Fields From Above

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In Rio de Janeiro, say Italian photographers Gabriele Galimberti and Edoardo Delille, life is divided into social stratas, the urban slums separated from the affluent residents of the city’s South Zone in all but one arena: the sports field.

‘HAZMAT Surfing’ Photos Predict a Poisonous, Dark Future for Our Oceans

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When Washington-based photographer Michael Dyrland visited Los Angeles for a shoot, he anticipated surfing the open sea and riding the waves beneath the sunny sky. What he found, he admits, was not what he had hoped; after an evening of heavy rains, he was confined to the shore for days, the ocean contaminated with ten billion gallons of runoff composed of— as the photographer puts it— “sewage, garbage, oil, and shit (literally, human fecal matter).” Had he paddled into the water, Dyrland would have been vulnerable to staph infections, respiratory illness, MRSA, and Hepatitis C.

The Flex Dancers of East New York, Brooklyn Make Their Debut in This Electrifying Photo Series

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Flex dancing, says New York City-based photographer Deidre Schoo, is unlike anything else she’s ever witnessed. Born out of the streets and homes of the East New York neighborhood in Brooklyn, the phenomenon is composed of gravity-defying movements and maneuvers that test the limits of human anatomy, each strung together to tell a story that incites its audience to cheer, fall silent, and erupt once more.

These 40 Hiking Photos From Around the World Will Give You Serious Wanderlust

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Hiking at a glacial ice cave at Skaftafell National Park, Iceland © Peter Adams / Offset

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Backpacker in autumn Nire shrubs in Los Glaciares National Park, Patagonia, Argentina © Johnathan Ampersand Esper / Aurora Photos / Offset

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Couple hiking on the island of Oahu, Hawaii © Julian Walter / Offset

Hiking and art-making might seem at first like unrelated pastimes, but a small glimpse through history will reveal the two recreations are often inextricably intertwined. Hiking for sport came into prominence in the late 1700s, born in large part from the Romanticism that permeated contemporary art movements. As European cities became increasingly industrial, creative minds flocked to the hilly countryside in hopes of reconnecting with the sublime in nature. Painters like German-born Caspar David Friedrich frequently pictured lone hikers dwarfed by the divine and sprawling landscape that surrounded them, rendering moments in which mankind was at once humbled and exalted by the powers of the wilderness.

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