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Posts tagged: night photography

Photo du Jour: Praia dos Aivados Beach

AlessandroP01

In 2011, photographer Alessandro Puccinelli purchased an old Hymer motorhome and decided to set off on a long journey along the southern coast of Portugal. Spending the majority of his time alone, he was able to focus his energy on capturing the ocean, which remains his primary passion in both life and photography.

What’s In Your Camera Bag?: ‘Dark City’ Photographer Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet

Clarissa Bonet

From Dark City, a series of Chicago’s city lights captured in a sea of darkness.

What’s in your camera bag?
Canon 5D Mark III, 50mm f1.2 lens, 85mm f1.2 lens, 24-70mm f2.8 lens, 70-200mm f4 IS lens, lens cleaning cloth, memory cards, extra batteries, hand warmers, sketchbook, pen, iPhone, business cards, drivers license, debit card, tissues, gloves.

What’s the most unusual item in your camera bag? Probably my reusable hand warmers. It’s typically around freezing when I am shooting, as I make the Dark City work in the fall and winter months—in Chicago. I put them inside my gloves and they keep my hands fairly warm, considering the temperatures outside.

The Ominous Glow of Prison Lights Photographed on the Outskirts of Towns Across the U.S.

Stephen Tourlentes

Carson City, NV State Death House Prison, 2002.

Stephen Tourlentes

Florence, CO Federal Prison, 2005.

Massachusetts-based photographer Stephen Tourlentes‘ series Of Length and Measures is a collection of photographs of U.S. prisons shot at night.

Illuminated Trees Photographed at Night by Ralf Peters

Ralf-Peters photography

German photographer Ralf Peters takes everyday objects and spaces and puts them in a new light, literally. He captures plants, trees, houses, and bridges immersed in total darkness, illuminating only parts of them in a calculated way. The result is a new incarnation of the object, exposed for its colorful and sculptural qualities. Selected work from his series Night / Colours is currently on display at Bernhard Knaus Fine Art in Frankfurt as part of a group exhibition featuring 12 gallery artists. It runs until January 26, 2013.

Luminous Nighttime Photos of European Oil Refineries

Branislav Kropilak

The series came very naturally to me because of the strong industrial nature of the cities I have lived in. I can remember that as a kid factories always intrigued me. Most of the areas were so immense, it took me entire nights of walking around, trying out and choosing the best angles for the structures. I often kept shooting until dawn until I got exactly what I wanted.—Branislav Kropilak

Factories is a series by Slovakian photographer Branislav Kropilak shot at night throughout Slovakia and Austria. Much of his work investigates the intimate relationship between humans and technology. He is inspired by industrial design, architecture and urbanism.

Branislav Kropilak

Photographs of Old Shanghai at Night

Old-Shanghai Erin Fitzsimmons photography

Erin Fitzsimmons photographs urban and rural landscapes and also works commercially in architectural photography. Shanghai Nights was shot in 2011 and focuses on the demise of the old Shanghai. Fitzsimmons writes:

Shanghai is the epitome of the dichotomy which is China, an ancient place which is thrusting itself into the future while seemingly discarding the past with disregard. Old Shanghai is a shattered version of its former self, a town of wood and brick in a city of steel and concrete. This creates a place which seems to bring about its own death, but whispers of charm and beauty can still be heard at night in narrow streets and alleys.

Jon Phillip Sheridan, Virginia

Jon Phillip Sheridan received his BFA in Photography at the Maryland Institute College of Art in Baltimore. He is now based in Charlottesville, Virginia. Of this series, Residual, he says ‘Behind highway motels and apartment complexes, primordial forces seek to reclaim even the most developed areas at night. Entropy is at work and disorder strains to break through. Industry and nature ebb and flow, intermittently covering one another. Because of this our referential relationship to the landscape and our surroundings is constantly changing. This is the focus of all my work — my curiosity in exploring this shifting awareness of space and the human patterns that mark it’.