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Posts tagged: nature photography

Thievery in the Redwood Forests of Humboldt County, California

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Coastal Drive, Southwest View

The redwood trees of Northern Pacific Coast are among the oldest living things on earth, with life spans that average 1,200 to 1,800 years. Also known as Sequoia sepmervirens, they include these evergreens include the tallest trees on the planet, reaching up to 379 feet (115.5 meters) in height and 29.2 feet (8.9 meters) in diameter. Simply put, they are majestic beings that have fallen victim to the greed of wo/man.

The First Peoples of American lived in the forest for thousands of years, able to create a symbiotic relationship with the land without destroying it. Their spiritual beliefs, combined with knowledge of the natural world, allowed them to cultivate the resources of the forest and live in harmony with the earth.

All of this changed with the arrival of an imperialist force that traveled across the Atlantic Ocean and took land that did not belong to them. As the descendants of Europe made this country their own, they ravaged the landscape without thought to the consequences of their actions. They began decimating the forests to build homes, tearing down trees with no effort to replace the forests they destroyed.

The Couple Who Found A Shared Love For Tornado Chasing

07 May 2016: A classic severe weather set-up in the high plains of Colorado near the town of Wray, which yielded one of the most photogenic tornadoes of the year. We were just ahead of the storm as the tornado started and tracked with it as it grew from a fine funnel to a sizeable cone tornado. At this moment, the twister was at its most photogenic while its parent supercell continued to be manageable. We were among a number of people, including those you see in the shot, nervously enjoying the epic display nature put on for us.

07 June 2014: A clash between two storm cells in New Mexico, US in June 2014, each with its own rotating updraft. It appeared as though one updraft was anticyclonic, resulting in a very turbulent scene. The curved striations of the oldest noticeable against the new bubbling convection of the newer. It was a fantastic sight to watch and it’s the rarity of such scenes that keep drawing us back to the US Plains each year.

The Irish philosopher Edmund Burke wrote in 1757:”The passion caused by the great and sublime in nature… is Astonishment; and astonishment is that state of the soul, in which all its motions are suspended, with some degree of horror.”  Referring to the aesthetic concept of the sublime, Burke explains how fear – especially the fear of God – can be evoked by the power of nature, and it is exactly this mixture of awe and fear we feel when looking at these apocalyptic images by British couple Cammie Czuchnicki and Tim Moxon, aka Weather Studios. Each spring for the last seven years, the couple made the trip to the US to follow the tornado season north – from Texas to the Dakotas – to photograph the spectacular weather. In their photos, the storms are shown raging across the land, rolling in like mega-tsunamis, making it hard not to focus on our vulnerability as humans.

A Fearless Storm Chaser Takes Astonishing Photos

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Florence, Texas

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Georgetown, Texas

Jason Weingart was there when the the widest tornado ever recorded struck El Reno, Oklahoma in May of 2013, the same one that killed three researchers. Two years earlier, he had nearly been hit by positive lightning, escaping death by only a few feet. By the time he was safe, he noticed the wax leaking from his ears.

Behold the Magic of the Japanese Firefly

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In Japan, the firefly season comes alive at the beginning of the rainy season. Keen to capture this enchanting night-time spectacle, Kei Nomiyama ventured out into the back-country close to where he lives on Shikoku Island in Japan, to observe and photograph it. “I’m a scientist, not a professional photographer,” says Nomiyama who is an Associate Professor at Ehime University. “However, these activities lead me in the same direction. My basic way of thinking is as one who loves nature and animals. I became a scientist to protect nature, and I had an interest in photography to record nature.” 

‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest Offers The Chance To Win $15,000 (Sponsored)

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“Rockhopper Penguins Storm the Beach” © Rick Beldegreen, Second Prize Winner 2015

Ansel Adams revealed one of photography’s best kept secrets when he said “bad weather makes for good photography.” It’s true; when everyone else is ducking for cover from an oncoming blizzard or monsoon, the photographers are running in the opposite direction and into the eye of the storm. Weather.com understands this idea better than most, and their annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest, now in its third year, is a testament to the enduring relationship between the elements of nature and the will of mankind.

A Dark and Majestic Fairy Tale of Animals Lost in the Forest Mist

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Frank Machalowski’s Tierwald hangs heavy with mystery. In the apparent silence of the forest, rendered in delicate greys, great beasts hulk, meeting the gaze of the viewer with apparent lack of concern. The effect is magical realist in character: it evokes tranquility as much as it surprises with its subject matter. Machalowski provokes questions: are these beasts really present? And how? He seems to frame a private moment of magic, crystallising it and passing it forward for the viewer to see.

Photographing the Mysteries of the New Forest

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Ellie Davies’ latest body of work, Half Light, is a new direction for the artist. Though all her work concerns the space of the forest – “a boundary or threshold between what we consider to be ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’” – in earlier projects her intervention as photographer has been more obvious: smoke, stars, mossy sculptures or paths of coloured leaves appear, inviting a near-fantastical reading of each scene. In Half Light, Davies adopts a sparser, more subtle approach. For this new series she uses natural bodies of water, found in the forest, to carry her meaning.

Artist uses Long Exposures to Create Ecstatic Light Sculptures

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Comfortable with long exposure photography, Vitor Schietti decided he wanted to learn more, to push himself to experiment further. After discovering the work of light painting photo artists such as Eric Staller, Lightmark, and Brian Hart – amongst others – he began to make his own light paintings. The results are a dazzling series of images titled Impermanent Sculptures.

Beautiful Photos of Dandelion Dewdrops Prove You Can Find Magic in Your Own Backyard with an iPhone

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While Autum had never owned a ‘real camera’, after she received her first iPhone, she says she was pleased with how good the quality of the photos were and how convenient it was to have around. Then, just over two-and-a-half years ago, Autum saw a macro picture posted on Instagram and noticed it was also taken with an iPhone.

Compassionate Portraits Capture the Dignity and Grace of Farm Animals

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As the global farming industry expands, mankind, suggests New Zealand-based photographer Cally Whitham, has in many ways failed to recognize the inherent dignity and grace that lies within the breasts of farm animals. With Epitaph, she pictures barnyard inhabitants—from pigs to sheep, cows to turkeys—in tender and fanciful portraits, resurrecting the oft-forgotten pathos that ties us to our fellow creatures.

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