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Posts tagged: nature photography

Hayato Wakabayashi’s Majestic Photos of Frozen Waterfalls and Caves in Japan

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Japanese photographer Hayato Wakabayashi finds his inspiration in natural elements. While photographing his last project, which involved documenting the intensity of volcanoes and typhoons, he started to become interested in the slow and organic variations of nature. For his most recent series, Gravity, he ventured out into the bitter cold of Japan’s mountainous regions to capture one of natures most beautiful phenomenon. These frozen caves and waterfalls can only be found in the coldest months of the year.

Australian Photographer Captures the Most Beautiful Images of Waves You’ll Ever See

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Australian photographer Ray Collins stumbled into his career as an ocean photographer almost by accident. Eight years ago, while working as a coal miner, he and some surfer friends ventured out to the beach to take photos. He began taking images of the ocean, seascapes and surfers in his spare time. A later knee injury led him to take up ocean photography full time. He has since found his passion, and returns to the beach every morning before dawn to capture the breaking waves for his series, and recently published book, Found at Sea.

Awe-Inspiring Photos of Holland’s Starling Murmurations

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© Luc Roymans / Offset

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© Luc Roymans / Offset

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© Luc Roymans / Offset

Standing at the outskirts of a forest in the North of Holland, Belgium-based wildlife photographer Luc Roymans captures thousands of starlings as they ascent into the heavens, forming intricate and densely packed hordes across the painted sky.

Forming at dusk when the starlings set out to roost, the mysterious masses of fluttering birds are known as murmurations. Although science is just now catching up with the elusive phenomenon, we now know that starling murmurations can ensure safety for the small birds, serving as an instinctual defense against birds of prey. The changes in the birds’ movements happen at an almost imperceptibly fast rate, with each individual of hundreds or even millions maintaining a keen awareness to the slightest shifts in his fellows.

Through Roymans’s eyes, it seems almost impossible that these magical winged formations could ever be explained away by simple physics. The starlings emerge beneath his gaze as fairies, emissaries from another world, nimble dancers engaging in what he calls “a ballet by the birds.” While shooting, he was most struck by the variations in density of the murmurations, tracing the ways in which the birds alternately fanned out and huddled together. The swarm, he suggests, resembled not the sum of many individual creatures but a single, fluid mass blanketing the evening sky.

All photos featured in this post can be found on Offset, a new curated collection of high-end commercial and editorial photography and illustration from award-winning artists around the world. Offset is a category partner on Feature Shoot.

Photographer Michael Benson Talks Astronomy, Infinity, and Existential Crises

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The Ultraviolet Sun, Trace, July 30, 1999 [2010]

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Enceladus Geysers Water into Space, Cassini, December, 25, 2009 [2012]

I don’t have to say how much I love Michael Benson’s work. These photographs were pulled together from NASA and ESA space probes. They are composites of two or more black-and-white images that have been mosaicked through Benson’s own computer work. They are pictures of how we see the universe, not the universe itself. What I see in them is a hunger for beauty in an infinity of space. That’s the greatest mystery. No matter how violent and strange the universe, at the heart of us is beauty.

Photographer Jessica Hines Discovers Beauty on the Surface of a Swamp

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On a particularly sunny day in the early weeks of January, photographer Jessica Hines noticed something peculiar happening in the swamp near her house. Due to the suns reflection on the water and a natural combination of plant oil and pollen, an intense spectrum of rainbow colors appeared on the entire surface. After photographing the colored swamp from the waters edge and loving what she captured, Hines purchased a pair of chest-high waders the very next day so she could get an even closer look. The result is an abstract and otherworldly photo series titled Spirit Stories.

Sweet and Subtle Photos of Twigs, Leaves and Branches Frozen in Ice

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© Anna Williams / Offset

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© Anna Williams / Offset

In a striking editorial series of still lifes, acclaimed New York-based photographer Anna Williams captures natural elements—leaves, branches, and twigs—caught within blocks of ice.

Astonishing Photos of an Extremely Rare Flipped Iceberg

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When San Francisco-based photographer Alex Cornell visited Antarctica with his sister and mother, he could not have predicted that –amidst the majestic sights of penguins and seals– he would encounter the singular and vastly unusual phenomenon known as a flipped iceberg. Surrounded by its fellow icy mammoths, the overturned structure revealed the glossy, transparent blue crystals that hide beneath the familiar snowy surface.

Photographer Christopher Payne Talks to Us About Industrial Ruins, Gothic Castles, and What Goes Into Building a Piano

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Christopher Payne‘s Squarespace website

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Buffalo State Hospital, Buffalo, New York

With a background in architecture, New York City-based photographer Christopher Payne is drawn to abandoned buildings, neglected structures that jointly disclose forgotten chapters of America’s storied past.

Payne’s fascination with the antiquated and disused began with his documentation of the city’s outmoded manual subway systems, to which he was afforded unlimited access. In recent years, he has chronicled spaces ranging from the pervasive and once densely populated asylums of the 1800s and early 1900s to the eroded landscape of North Brother Island, where in the latter part of the 1800s, citizens afflicted with infectious diseases were quarantined from the remainder of the city. In his shadowy, evocative frames, America’s past becomes a mythical place, one that is both acutely fantastical and undeniably real. Here, the photographer illuminates the mysterious and haunting remnants of our shared history, playing the dual part of the detective and the preservationist.

In his more recent projects, Payne has turned his gaze towards contemporary America by capturing the inner workings of Astoria’s historic Steinway piano factory as well as New England’s older textile mills as compared with North and South Carolina’s more state-of-the-art factories. We spoke with the artist about his interest in both deserted and sustained industries and why he chose Squarespace to build his site.

Magical Jellyfish Photographed by Marine Biologist Alexander Semenov

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© Alexander Semenov / Offset

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© Alexander Semenov / Offset

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© Alexander Semenov / Offset

Moscow-based photographer and marine biologist Alexander Semenov is willing to do anything to get the perfect shot, including diving into the icy depths of the White Sea that runs along the northwestern coast of Russia.

An Intimate Look at Kindred Spirits Evie Lou and Laura Jane (NSFW)

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Evie Lou and Laura Jane looks at the complex and intimate relationship between photographer Noelle McCleaf’s mother and her best friend. It’s a story of two women who describe themselves as “alike with an honored difference,” who together signify an under-represented part of American society: aging women full of charisma, vibrant energy, with an understanding of the Earth and our place within it.