Posts tagged: nature photography

‘Earth and Space’ Photo Book is Full of Astonishing Vistas from NASA’s Archives


“Earthrise” was shot on December 24, 1968, by astronaut William Anders during the Apollo 8 mission. The famed nature photographer Galen Rowell believed this to be the most influential environmental photograph ever taken—and it certainly stands out as one of the most extraordinary observations of Earth from space. The impromptu shot was taken as the spacecraft was being rotated and Anders caught sight of the impressive view. In recordings of the moment, you can hear him marvel, “Wow, is that pretty!” as if he were seeing our planet for the first time. In the image, the Earth is rising 5 degrees above the horizon, just as the astronauts are rising up from behind the eastern (as viewed from Earth) part of the Moon. Although the Moon looks close enough to touch, it’s actually about 484 miles (779 kilometers) from the spacecraft.


This iconic image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is often compared to the vivid, erratic whorls of color in a Van Gogh painting and reveals a never-before-seen halo of dust and light skyrocketing across trillions of miles. The dust and light surround a red supergiant known as V838 Monocerotis, located about 20,000 light years from Earth at the outer edge of the Milky Way. In 2002, the star’s brightness increased by several magnitudes over the course of several months, making it six hundred thousand times more luminous than the Sun. This pulse of light, also known as a light echo, most likely occurred some tens of thousands of years ago.

From ancient mythologies to modern science, mankind has trusted that in some essential way, we are bound to whatever it is that lies beyond the horizon and without the confines of the Earth’s atmosphere.

The Glow-Worms of New Zealand’s Limestone Caves Revealed in Magical Photo Series




As a child, New Zealand-based photographer Joseph Michael understood the Arachnocampa luminosa (glow worm) as a familiar sight, as as co-habitants of the landscape he called home. Only when he began to travel did his mind begin return to the bioluminescent larvae and mature gnats, compelling him to venture into the North Island’s thirty million year old limestone caves in search of the twinkling creatures that line their ceilings.

Shot in Australia and Cuba, Photos Reveal What Lurks Directly Beneath the Surface of the Sea


Bluebottle cnidarian, Bushrangers Bay, NSW Australia


Waratah Anemones, Port Kembla, NSW Australia


American Crocodile, Jardines de la Reina, Cuba.

New South Wales-based photographer Matthew (Matty) Smith got his first taste of the sea during his boyhood, when his family went snorkeling in France and the Mediterranean. Since then, the thirst for the briny deep has only intensified, compelling him to all corners of the globe in search of the elusive creatures that linger just below the surface of the human realm. For Over/Under, Smith captures the very point in which the subaquatic meets the world above, cracking open his frame—and our planet— into two divergent realms.

19 of Our Favorite Baby Animal Photos From the Offset Collection


Emperor Penguin Chick on Adult’s Feet, Snow Hill Island, Antarctica © Radius Images / Offset


Mother and child Manatees underwater © Jimmy White / Offset


A polar bear cub rests on her mother’s legs at Wapusk National Park © Richard Wear / Design Pics / Offset

There are few sights as miraculous as that of a baby animal learning the ropes from his mom- and in some cases, his dad. According to evolutionary biologists, humans are genetically hardwired to respond to infants, even when those little ones are of another species. We’re made to register cuteness, to feel an urge to protect and nurture small creatures, so it’s no wonder that photos of baby animals can inspire even the most curmudgeonly person to crack a smile.

13 Strange and Otherworldly Photographs of Wild Mushrooms


© SambaPhoto / Offset


© Johnér / Offset

Thousands of distinct mushroom species pepper the surface of our planet, growing singularly or in dense colonies from the rain forests of New Zealand and the Blue Mountains of Oregon. Along the forests and meadows of Western Europe, they grow in circles, sometimes called “fairy rings,” believed to cast spells upon all who enter their midst.

Photographer Captures the Magnificent Live Oak Trees of Ossabaw, Georgia




Atlanta based photographer Diane Kirkland has been documenting Ossabaw, an island off the coast of Georgia, since the 1980s. As the state’s first heritage preserve, with no bridge or ferry access, the remote island is used only for educational and environmental purposes. Her series Live Oaks of Ossabaw is a way to preserve and interpret the natural beauty here.

Photographer Beautifully Captures Growth and Decay Through Sheets of Plexiglass Filters



Photographer Krista Steinke spends her summers at Purgatory Road, a wooden region of rural New York that is divided by an infamous dirt-covered path. On one side of the road is a cavernous slope that is ominous, damp, and bug infested. On the opposite side lies a lush, peaceful forest. The intersection of this unusual landscape sets the tone for her series, also titled Purgatory Road. Here, she uses her camera to explore a metaphoric state of “in-between”.

Photos of Winter Waves Capture the Power of Mother Nature



For his series Wave Pacific, photographer Scott Hoyle captures that chaotic and sublime moment when two opposing forces simultaneously collide together in a burst of emotion. In stark black and white, each violent crash is unique in shape and form. The dark background in contrast with the whiteness of the wave indicates an absence of location and environmental reference. These waves could be anywhere.

Hayato Wakabayashi’s Majestic Photos of Frozen Waterfalls and Caves in Japan



Japanese photographer Hayato Wakabayashi finds his inspiration in natural elements. While photographing his last project, which involved documenting the intensity of volcanoes and typhoons, he started to become interested in the slow and organic variations of nature. For his most recent series, Gravity, he ventured out into the bitter cold of Japan’s mountainous regions to capture one of natures most beautiful phenomenon. These frozen caves and waterfalls can only be found in the coldest months of the year.

Australian Photographer Captures the Most Beautiful Images of Waves You’ll Ever See




Australian photographer Ray Collins stumbled into his career as an ocean photographer almost by accident. Eight years ago, while working as a coal miner, he and some surfer friends ventured out to the beach to take photos. He began taking images of the ocean, seascapes and surfers in his spare time. A later knee injury led him to take up ocean photography full time. He has since found his passion, and returns to the beach every morning before dawn to capture the breaking waves for his series, and recently published book, Found at Sea.