Posts tagged: nature photography

A Fearless Storm Chaser Takes Astonishing Photos


Florence, Texas


Georgetown, Texas

Jason Weingart was there when the the widest tornado ever recorded struck El Reno, Oklahoma in May of 2013, the same one that killed three researchers. Two years earlier, he had nearly been hit by positive lightning, escaping death by only a few feet. By the time he was safe, he noticed the wax leaking from his ears.

Behold the Magic of the Japanese Firefly



In Japan, the firefly season comes alive at the beginning of the rainy season. Keen to capture this enchanting night-time spectacle, Kei Nomiyama ventured out into the back-country close to where he lives on Shikoku Island in Japan, to observe and photograph it. “I’m a scientist, not a professional photographer,” says Nomiyama who is an Associate Professor at Ehime University. “However, these activities lead me in the same direction. My basic way of thinking is as one who loves nature and animals. I became a scientist to protect nature, and I had an interest in photography to record nature.” 

‘It’s Amazing Out There’ Photo Contest Offers The Chance To Win $15,000 (Sponsored)


“Rockhopper Penguins Storm the Beach” © Rick Beldegreen, Second Prize Winner 2015

Ansel Adams revealed one of photography’s best kept secrets when he said “bad weather makes for good photography.” It’s true; when everyone else is ducking for cover from an oncoming blizzard or monsoon, the photographers are running in the opposite direction and into the eye of the storm. understands this idea better than most, and their annual It’s Amazing Out There Photo Contest, now in its third year, is a testament to the enduring relationship between the elements of nature and the will of mankind.

A Dark and Majestic Fairy Tale of Animals Lost in the Forest Mist



Frank Machalowski’s Tierwald hangs heavy with mystery. In the apparent silence of the forest, rendered in delicate greys, great beasts hulk, meeting the gaze of the viewer with apparent lack of concern. The effect is magical realist in character: it evokes tranquility as much as it surprises with its subject matter. Machalowski provokes questions: are these beasts really present? And how? He seems to frame a private moment of magic, crystallising it and passing it forward for the viewer to see.

Photographing the Mysteries of the New Forest

Half Light 1, 2016

Half Light 2, 2016

Ellie Davies’ latest body of work, Half Light, is a new direction for the artist. Though all her work concerns the space of the forest – “a boundary or threshold between what we consider to be ‘fact’ and ‘fiction’” – in earlier projects her intervention as photographer has been more obvious: smoke, stars, mossy sculptures or paths of coloured leaves appear, inviting a near-fantastical reading of each scene. In Half Light, Davies adopts a sparser, more subtle approach. For this new series she uses natural bodies of water, found in the forest, to carry her meaning.

Artist uses Long Exposures to Create Ecstatic Light Sculptures


Comfortable with long exposure photography, Vitor Schietti decided he wanted to learn more, to push himself to experiment further. After discovering the work of light painting photo artists such as Eric Staller, Lightmark, and Brian Hart – amongst others – he began to make his own light paintings. The results are a dazzling series of images titled Impermanent Sculptures.

Beautiful Photos of Dandelion Dewdrops Prove You Can Find Magic in Your Own Backyard with an iPhone



While Autum had never owned a ‘real camera’, after she received her first iPhone, she says she was pleased with how good the quality of the photos were and how convenient it was to have around. Then, just over two-and-a-half years ago, Autum saw a macro picture posted on Instagram and noticed it was also taken with an iPhone.

Compassionate Portraits Capture the Dignity and Grace of Farm Animals




As the global farming industry expands, mankind, suggests New Zealand-based photographer Cally Whitham, has in many ways failed to recognize the inherent dignity and grace that lies within the breasts of farm animals. With Epitaph, she pictures barnyard inhabitants—from pigs to sheep, cows to turkeys—in tender and fanciful portraits, resurrecting the oft-forgotten pathos that ties us to our fellow creatures.

‘Earth and Space’ Photo Book is Full of Astonishing Vistas from NASA’s Archives


“Earthrise” was shot on December 24, 1968, by astronaut William Anders during the Apollo 8 mission. The famed nature photographer Galen Rowell believed this to be the most influential environmental photograph ever taken—and it certainly stands out as one of the most extraordinary observations of Earth from space. The impromptu shot was taken as the spacecraft was being rotated and Anders caught sight of the impressive view. In recordings of the moment, you can hear him marvel, “Wow, is that pretty!” as if he were seeing our planet for the first time. In the image, the Earth is rising 5 degrees above the horizon, just as the astronauts are rising up from behind the eastern (as viewed from Earth) part of the Moon. Although the Moon looks close enough to touch, it’s actually about 484 miles (779 kilometers) from the spacecraft.


This iconic image, taken by the Hubble Space Telescope’s Advanced Camera for Surveys on February 8, 2004, is often compared to the vivid, erratic whorls of color in a Van Gogh painting and reveals a never-before-seen halo of dust and light skyrocketing across trillions of miles. The dust and light surround a red supergiant known as V838 Monocerotis, located about 20,000 light years from Earth at the outer edge of the Milky Way. In 2002, the star’s brightness increased by several magnitudes over the course of several months, making it six hundred thousand times more luminous than the Sun. This pulse of light, also known as a light echo, most likely occurred some tens of thousands of years ago.

From ancient mythologies to modern science, mankind has trusted that in some essential way, we are bound to whatever it is that lies beyond the horizon and without the confines of the Earth’s atmosphere.

The Glow-Worms of New Zealand’s Limestone Caves Revealed in Magical Photo Series




As a child, New Zealand-based photographer Joseph Michael understood the Arachnocampa luminosa (glow worm) as a familiar sight, as as co-habitants of the landscape he called home. Only when he began to travel did his mind begin return to the bioluminescent larvae and mature gnats, compelling him to venture into the North Island’s thirty million year old limestone caves in search of the twinkling creatures that line their ceilings.

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