Posts tagged: interior photography

Photographer Returns to His Beloved Grandma’s House Six Months After Her Death



Los Angeles-based photographer Robert P. Cohen remembers his grandmother’s house simply as “Mama’s House.” During his childhood, the Woodmere, Long Island home was where all the children came together to eat their grandma’s fresh-baked goods, to play, leap and bound across the fancy furniture, and be tucked in at night with familiar tales of distant family member and ancestors. Six months after his grandmother’s death, Cohen returned once more to the house, preserving its images just as it had been when she was alive.

Photos Capture the Surreal Beauty of China’s Empty Amusement Parks During Off-Season


Little China, Shenzhen


Treasure Island Pirate Kingdom, Qingdao


Basket of concrete fruit, Huairou

In the depths of off-season, Italian photographer Stefano Cerio roams many the amusement parks of China alone and under the ashen skies. For Chinese Fun, he braved the emptied fairgrounds of Shanghai, Beijing, Qingdao, and Hong Kong to discover what remains after the parks are closed, the children departed, and all is silent.

Photographer Gets Investigated for Terrorism, Responds in Best Possible Way




“Once you’re wrapped up in a terrorism investigation, you never really escape from it,” says artist and University of Maryland professor Hasan Elahi of his experience as an innocent man under the scrutiny of the Federal Bureau of Investigation.

Photos Document the Simple Life in the Abandoned Villages of Catalonia


Aldea De Pano, Huesca, Aragon. Ruben With A Rabbit And His Dog Mistu


El Fonoll, Tarragona, (Conca de Barberà), Catalonia, Spain. A woman with her daughter on holiday at El Fonoll’s naturist village.


Matavenero, Leon, Spain Matavenero, Leon, Spain. One of the houses of Matavenero.

The Northern Spanish landscape, report Italian photographers Diambra Mariani and Francesco Mion, is flecked with tiny, sequestered villages that have remained largely deserted for decades. While most of the rural population has since abandoned these bucolic corners of the country for buzzing cities, recent years have seen a rebirth; with the help of a few devoted and romantic souls, these forgotten bowers have been suffused with new life.

Portraits of Backpackers Living in a Tiny, Hidden Hotel in Tokyo



Almost two years ago, the photographer Won Kim was back-packing across Japan and passed through Arakawa-ku, a ward in northeastern Tokyo. There he ran into a tiny hotel which was set in one of the larger buildings that lined the street, with no signboards to guide you there, it was almost hidden away. Kim immediately fell in love with the unusual vibes of the establishment, which was like a home to people from all over the world, unlike the typical homogenous societies in Japan – he was determined to revisit this space.

Photographer Mitja Schneehage Finds Beauty in Parking Lots


© Mitja Schneehage / Offset


© Mitja Schneehage / Offset

Hamburg-based architecture photographer Mitja Schneehage isn’t interested in places that are conventionally beautiful; instead, he mines for artistry in the banal, functional environments that most of us pass by without a second glance. In parking lots, he find moments of elegance and minimalism.

Photographer Hatnim Lee Captures All Walks of Life Inside Her Parents’ Liquor Store




When Korean-born photographer Hatnim Lee was a child, her parents’ Washington, D.C. liquor store was a home away from home. She was an infant when her parents moved to the United States to open up shop, and she spent much of her childhood chipping in and helping out. Their customers became a sort of extended family, popping by throughout the day to peer in and wave hello behind a layer of thick plexiglass. Plexiglass is Lee’s album of the community built by her parent’s liquor store, an ode to their hard work and to the people she has come to know both intimately and at a distance.

Surprising Portraits of Russian Teens Who Love and Idolize Vladimir Putin


Tanya Arkhipova: “I like how Putin treats his children and wife, I think he’s a great husband. He made people respect Russia.”


Fan Club Putin

In 2007, Russian President Vladimir Putin was named TIME magazine’s Person of the Year. As then Managing Editor Richard Stengel sat down to pen the now-famous article and photographer Platon shot the austere, unsmiling cover portrait, another photographer, Hungarian-born Bela Doka, was documenting the Russian youngsters who were most touched by the quickly spreading global phenomenon surrounding their president. That same year, Doka unearthed a community of adolescents and young adults known as the Putin Fan Club, a group of more than a thousand individuals who venerated the Russian president to the point where he beat out pop stars and even religious figures for a place in their innermost hearts.

Photographs Capture the Worldwide Phenomenon Known as ‘Dark Tourism’


The collapsed Xuankou school buildings, part of a tour of ruins from the 2008 Wenchuan earthquake, Sichuan, China.


Genocide memorial site at Ntarama, Rwanda.

For I Was Here, Paris-based photographer Ambroise Tézenas delves the practice of grief tourism (or dark tourism), a global phenomenon whereby sightseers are drawn to the scenes of mass tragedies, from the sites of genocides to those of natural disasters. Shedding the privileges normally afforded to members of the press, he chose to embark on the journey just as his fellow travelers did, paying for his own guided tours and uncovering in the process a network of sinister locales, bound together by the rapt attention they inspire in day-trippers young and old.

Tina Barney Talks to Us About Her New Exhibition, The Passage of Time, and the True Meaning of Portraiture


Lipstick “New York Stories, W Magazine,” 1999 © Tina Barney, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery


Mr. and Mrs. Leo Castelli, W Magazine, 1998 © Tina Barney, Courtesy of Paul Kasmin Gallery

In decade in which we obsess over change, be it catastrophic or fortuitous, the photographs of Tina Barney continue to remind us of that which is constant. Beginning the 1980s, she has captured the world, her world, in large-scale analogue photographs, laying bare the push and pull of tension and familiarity that run beneath domestic life. Since then, her imagery has invited us not only into private interiors of life for affluent New Yorkers and elite New Englanders but also into the palatial homes of European aristocrats and small town American communities. Throughout it all, she has returned time and again to the family, to the home, and to the ubiquitous and essential need to belong.