Menu

Posts tagged: Carli Davidson

We Asked 17 Photographers: What’s the Biggest Lesson You’ve Learned in Your Photography Career?

Michael_Lewis

© Michael Lewis

Michael Lewis: To be confident. I’ve been shooting long enough to see current trends in our industry come and go. Although aware of these changing tides; I’ve always tried to continue to refine (and further define) my unique point of view. I’ve seen other photographers try to bend their aesthetic to fit in the mold of the current flavor of the week. For me, part of staying confident (and true to your vision) is standing your ground and doing what feels true to yourself.

Jamie Diamond: Don’t be afraid to take risks or to get it wrong sometimes, your successes and your failures are equally valuable.

Ricky Rhodes: I’m learning more and more to just stay true to yourself. This might sound like common sense, but I think being a good person goes a long way in this industry. Photography is based around relationships, it’s all about who you know and who knows you. People want to work with people they enjoy being around.

Thomas Alleman: As I consider not only my own career, but the successful careers of my friends and colleagues in this field, I find that the greatest resource one has is his or her own character, and the biggest lesson one learns is that that character is the only constant advantage you can wield.

Are you persistent? Are you driven? Do you read novels? Are you a gearhead? Are you empathic? Are you generous? Can you take a punch?

How are you communication skills? Can you write a compelling paragraph about your work for a grant application or a gallery submission? Can you explain yourself to people on the street? Can you persuade someone to let you photograph them, if they’re initially wary?

Can you get on an off a plane with competence, and find a location in a strange town and wrestle a shoot into shape? Can you transmit pictures on deadline? Can you deal with asshole editors? Are you a hothead? Are you a wimp? When the job goes bad, will you blame your assistant? Will you stay up all night for two straight days, to finish a project?

Can you weather the hard times that beset all creative entrepreneurs? Do you have backbone? Are you flexible? Can you make short-term sacrifices for long-term goals? Can you diversify? Can you teach? Can you take assignments? What’s your feeling about money and material possessions? At what point will you begin choosing convenience over excellence, and comfort over accomplishment?

These are character issues. They’re about your skill-set as a grown-up person. The greatest lesson I ever learned was that these are where your power and advantage and success will come from, over time.

25 Photographers Share The Worst Job They Had Before Becoming a Professional

Shutterstock

(Photo: Shutterstock)

We asked 25 photographers: ‘What’s the worst job you had before becoming a professional photographer?’

Brooke Frederick: A “Fan Photographer” at Lakers and Kings sporting events in LA. You basically had to chase people down and convince them to let you take their photo and then buy it. People would run away from me, completely ignore me, or yell at me to leave them alone. It was not fun.

Carli Davidson: I had a lot of pretty craptacular jobs before I became a photographer. I think jiffy lube grease monkey and truck stop porn shop cashier tie for the worst. I always came home with great stories thought!

Eirik Johnson: I worked as a landscaper and garbage collector for a housing development while in college. Pardon the pun, but that stank.

Elinor Carucci: I was a professional belly dancer for 15 years while developing a career as a fine art photographer (also published a book about my life as a professional belly dancer – Diary of a dancer – SteidlMack 2005), but i loved it! The worst job i had was babysitting a (the poor thing) colicky baby…

Adorable Portraits of Puppies Enjoying a Good Shake

Carli_Davidson_Koda

Koda

Carli_Davidson_Vincent

Vincent

For dogs, shaking off can a calming activity, one that relaxes the muscles while getting rid of pesky moisture, bugs, or even negative emotions. For Portland-based photographer Carli Davidson, dogs provide a similar sense of restoration and healing. In the sometimes painful world we live in, our furry friends are always there to remind us of what’s so beautiful, silly, and joyous about life. On the heels of her viral hit SHAKE, in which she captured dogs in the midst of a particularly satisfying shimmy, Davidson presents her new book SHAKE Puppies.

Pets with disabilities photographed by Carli Davidson

disabled-pets-Carli-Davidson

Portland-based Carli Davidson is an award-winning photographer and an experienced animal trainer and care worker. She captures the innate personalities of her subjects using her professional understanding of animal behavior. She is a freelance photographer for the Oregon Zoo and works with domestic animals for commercial and fine art projects. She spends much of her photo shoots rolling on the ground with whatever animal she is working with, and encouraging them to open up to the camera. Working at The Oregon Zoo, nature preserves and animal rescues have provided her with the opportunity to care for a wide range of animals, from chimpanzees to rats.

Her photography has been featured in national and international publications, photography magazines, and websites, including The New York Times, Vanity Fair, Esquire, BBC, Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, Photo District News and ABC World News.

disabled-pets-Carli-Davidson