Posts tagged: art fine photography

‘The Polar Pom-Pom Project’ Explores Climate Change in the Arctic

Blue_Whiteout Blue Whiteout

Scout Scout

Ice_Diamond Ice Diamond

Deborah Hamon’s series The Polar Pom-Pom Project is a combination of both art and activism. In the fall of 2013 she boarded a tall ship in Svalbard, 10 degrees away from the North Pole, and embarked on an arctic journey with a small group of international artists. Armed with her camera, and over 2000 yarn pom-poms made by elementary school children, Hamon has created a project that explores the effects of climate change on a generational scale.

Photographer Ayumi Tanaka’s Stunning Dioramas Made From Layered Negatives and Found Objects




Japanese-born artist Ayumi Tanaka’s series Wish You Were Here pushes the boundaries of traditional photography in this series derived from memories of her childhood. Rather than replicate exact experiences, Tanaka strives to convey the emotions behind these events through photo-collages that are packed with symbolism. The resulting tableaus mesh personal recollections of her childhood with traditional Japanese fairytales.

Photographer Hajdu Tamas Finds Humor in Small-Town Romania




Humor has a strange place in photography. So often a humorous photograph undermines the subject matter or the medium itself and leaves the image feeling like a ploy for cheap laughs. But when it works, when composition and moment and environment come together just right, and the photographer is clever enough to know when and how to press the shutter, a humorous photograph can have a tremendous impact.

A Look Inside ‘Photographers’ Sketchbooks’

SothThe sketchbook of Alec Soth

Vanden-Driessche The sketchbook of Thomas Vanden-Driessche

The mechanical nature of photography often results in the perception that photographers are “button-pushers;” that they have a keen eye and sense of timing, but the artistry stops there. Photographers’ Sketchbooks, a new book by Stephen McLaren and Bryan Formhals, provides a behind-the-scenes look into the idea conception and thought process of forty-nine photographers from around the globe.

Psychedelic Colors and Patterns Photographed on One of the Most Polluted Bodies of Water in America



Thought of as peaceful waterways that flow through quaint towns and bustling cities, canals are often romanticized. The Gowanus Canal, which runs through Brooklyn, New York, is neither peaceful nor picture-esque. Bustling maritime and commercial shipping activity led to the development of factories along its banks. Eventually, years of pollution, storm water runoff, and sewer overflows have earned the canal the title of “one of the nation’s most polluted bodies of water.”

Elizabeth Harper shot by David Yellen (FS exclusive)

elizabeth harper

David Yellen is known for taking powerful and striking portraits that highlight the depth and character of his subjects. His subjects have ranged from Warren Buffett to Kanye West to the Kardashian sisters, and his images have been featured on the covers of Fortune, Billboard and Snob magazines. His commercial clients include the Discovery Channel, Atlantic records and Juniper Networks. David was born in 1972 in Flushing, Queens, NY where he acquired an early expertise in bowling and the inner workings of New York pizza.

Matt Henry, London

Matt Henry photography Elvis

Matt Henry is a UK-based photographer who shoots little stories about 60s/70s America – a project that can be attributed to three decades of U.S. film and television addiction. Although his love of storytelling led him first into fashion photography, he quickly became tired of having to tell stories about beautiful women in beautiful clothes. Fueled by the notion that another photographic genre of narrative fiction had yet to be embraced, he set about creating his somewhat darkened vision of classic, rural America. Matt lives in Brighton with his Rhodesian Ridgeback dog Sam and works commercially out of Paris and London.

Tamar Levine, Los Angeles

Tamar Levine photography

Tamar Levine is a Los Angeles-based photographer specializing in fashion, portrait, and fine art photography. Since receiving her BFA with honors at Art Center College of Design in 2005, she has been working on editorial and commercial work for clients such as Runway Magazine, Reebok, 944 Magazine, Filter Magazine, Nylon, Interscope Records, Atlantic Records, Island Records, Angeleno Magazine and YRB Magazine. This work is from her series, Jell-O Salad, which was recently included in PDN’s 2011 Photo Annual.

Ben Sklar, Austin

Ben Sklar photography

Ben Sklar is based in Austin, Texas and photographs for publications such as The New York Times, National Geographic Magazine, Newsweek, The London Sunday Times and Time Magazine. This work is from the ongoing project, ‘Serenity’, in which he writes, ‘In the early spring of 2008 Aimee and her husband Jeff decided they were fed up.  They wanted to free themselves from the constraints of the mundane, routine everyday lifestyle in urban America that so many have become conditioned to call normal. The American Dream so many strive for had left them jaded and full of discontent. They donated everything they owned: a 50-inch TV, boxes of childrens’ toys, and even gave away their wedding rings to a couple they found on Craigslist.

Chernobyl: Work by Antonin Kratochvil, Maciek Nabrdalik & Donald Weber

Donald Webber photography

VII photographers Antonin Kratochvil, Donald Weber and Maciek Nabrdalik have been working independently in and around the Forbidden Zone of Chernobyl, traveling into the abandoned City of Pripyat as well as its eerily overgrown green countryside. Together they have amassed one of the definitive records of the Chernobyl disaster, creating a collection of photos documenting the secret evolution of the post-atomic disaster area, pictures that reveal a haunted world. A modern city once filled with atomic engineers and nuclear physicists was lost forever to calculus error and a culture of obsolescence. Disaster happens to highly advanced societies, but what happens after the steel fences go up?