Menu

Rachel Hulin’s Wistful Photographs of Motherhood

Rachel_Hulin_04

Rachel_Hulin_10

For Thirty-Five and One: The Short Days and the Long, photographer and photo editor Rachel Hulin joins her daughter Rose in moments of repose and discovery. As the infant navigates the homes of both the photographer and the two grandmothers, she explores the mother herself, climbing atop her nude body and reaching out for her touch. For the child, each instant is aglow with revelation and novelty, yet for Hulin, each interaction is piercingly precious. Rose’s days are long and sprawling, her mother’s brief and fleeting.

Using a wistful aesthetic drawn from Baroque painting and Technicolor cinema, Hulin allows color to softly drain from all but roses and fabrics pregnant with red. As in a resplendent flower garland painting by Jan Brueghel or Peter Paul Rubens depicting the Virgin and Christ, the mother and child are possessed of a delicate and cherished divinity, a mysterious and ineffable bond through which they alone can communicate. While drawing at times from spiritual imagery, the series is also passionately about this particular mother and child, who will continue to grow side by side.

Rachel_Hulin_01

Rachel_Hulin_09

Rachel_Hulin_07

Rachel_Hulin_03

Rachel_Hulin_06

Rache_Hulin_05

Rachel_Hulin_02

  • hwgarrison

    The Short Days and the Long resonates so deeply with me. A haunting and beautiful depiction of motherhood.

  • Claudia Dowling

    I have worked at People magazine and Life magazine, examining many
    photographs that purport to portray the human condition. But seldom have
    I seen pictures like these that seem to float in an elegiac,
    archetypical neverneverland of love and delight. Kudos to the
    photographer/mother.

  • melanie

    Some of these are ‘wistfully romantic’, but they don’t really bring anything new to this particular genre of photography. Hulin’s “Flying Henry” series was much more interesting – in that it was ‘fun’ and ‘light’.